Thomas B. Teppley

Mentioned in

  • Page 20

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1838 – December 31, 1839)

    Excerpt:
    February 19, 1838 ~ Monday Feb 19th An uncommon blustering day the air is full of snow and roads blocked up we spent the day in visiting the people they appeared believing. We started to go to our appointment at the school house and we had to wallow about a mile through the snow drifts without a road I froze one of my ears during the time. After Preaching to the people we returned to Mr Robert Baily's and spent the night {distance} 4 m February 20, 1838 ~ Tuesday ...
    Dates:
    February 19, 1838 February 20, 1838 February 21, 1838 February 22, 1838 February 23, 1838
  • Page 52

    Part of Leaves From My Journal

    Excerpt:
    LEAVES FROM MY JOURNAL. I had ample evidence of the fact that lying spirits had gone out into the world, for three persons whom I had baptized had been visited by Mr. Douglass, who told them that I denied the Bible and could not be depended upon; and they yielded to his insinuations until the devil took possession of them, and they were in a disaffected condition, and sent for me. When I met them they were in great affliction, but when I ...
    Dates:
    February 15, 1838
  • Page 53

    Part of Leaves From My Journal

    Excerpt:
    A LIGHT WITNESSED IN THE HEAVENS. house, and I got one of my ears frozen on the way; but not- withstanding the severity of the weather, we had quite a large and attentive audience. We also spent the next two days with the people there and held meetings. On the evening of the 21st of February, as we came out of the school-house, a light appeared in the north-eastern hori- zon, and spread to the west and soon rolled over our heads. It had the appearance of fire, blood and smoke, and at ...
    Dates:
    February 21, 1838
  • Page 54

    Part of Leaves From My Journal

    Excerpt:
    LEAVES FROM MY JOURNAL. of despair, believing that he had committed the unpardonable sin. However, I told him what the unpardonable sin was, and that he had not committed it; but that it was a trick of the devil to make him think so, in order to torment him. He then acknowledged that he went down to the wharf a few evenings before, with the intention of drowning himself, but when he looked into the cold, dark water he desisted and returned home, and had ...
    Dates:
    March 1, 1838 March 5, 1838
  • Page 10

    Part of Leaves From My Journal

    Excerpt:
    CONTENTS. CHAPTER VII. Curious Worship—Meet Elder Parrish—Labor Together in Ten- nessee—Adventure in Bloody River—A Night of Peril— Providential Light—Menaced by a Mob—Good Advice of a Baptist Preacher—Summary of my Labors during the Year. Page 18. CHAPTER VIII. Studying Grammar—Meet Elder Patten—Glorious News—Labor with A. O. Smoot—Turned out of a Meeting House by a Baptist Preacher—Preach in the Open Air—Good Result— Adventure on the Tennessee River—A Novel Charge to Arrest and Condemn Men ...
  • Page 19

    Part of Autobiography Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine 1883-84

    Excerpt:
    TULLIDGE'S QUARTERLY MAGAZINE. [Column 1] the North Island. Here I found that the seed I had sown was bringing forth fruit. Six persons were ready for bap- tism. But my mission to these islands was not an exception to the general rule: success did not come without many obstacles presenting themselves. Those who rejected the word were frequently inspired by the evil one to make an attempt at persecution. Some of those who felt to oppose me went down to the harbor ...
    Dates:
    February 15, 1838 February 21, 1838
  • Page 20

    Part of Autobiography Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine 1883-84

    Excerpt:
    AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF WILFORD WOODRUFF. [Column 1] and he felt impressed to say, "Walk in, gentlemen." There is probably no other chapter in the whole book that would have the same influence in causing any one to feed a person who professed to be a servant of God and asked for bread. After becoming acquainted with his circumstances I thought it providential that we were led to his house, for al- though he was a professor of religion and a
    Dates:
    March 1, 1838 March 5, 1838 March 22, 1838 March 28, 1838