William Ivins Appleby

William Ivins Appleby (1811-1870) was born 13 Aug. 1811 near New Egypt, Monmouth Co., New Jersey. He was the son of Jacob Appleby and Mary Lukers. He married Sarah B. Price on 23 Oct. 1830 in Monmouth Co., New Jersey. He was baptized 21 Sep. 1840 in New Jersey. He was a frequent correspondent of Wilford Woodruff and served with him in the Eastern States Mission in 1844. He died 20 May 1870 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah Territory.

Footnotes

William Ivans Appleby (24YL-VV3), "Family Tree, database,FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org, accessed 5 Feb. 2022). William Ivins Appleby, Wilford Woodruff Papers (https://wilfordwoodruffpapers.org/subjects/william-ivins-appleby, accessed 8 Feb. 2022). William Ivans Appleby, The Joseph Smith Papers (https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/person/william-ivins-appleby, accessed 4 Jan. 2022).

Mentioned in

  • Page 8

    Part of Letter to Brigham Young and Council, 15 February 1849

    Excerpt:
    He may be enabled to return & leave the country with honor & be enabled to remove his family & perhaps others to the valley: this I would be glad to see him do for I do think that Elder Badlam has endeavord to act in consent with the Presidency of the Church, And made a great exhertion since he has been in this country to do to his utmost to help the Church in their time of need. What I mean by the main channel lying before me is I know I was not sent to ...
  • Page 1

    Part of Letter to Willard Richards, 15 February 1849

    Excerpt:
    Cambridgeport Mass Febuary 15 AD 1849 To the Historian of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Dear Brother. Richards, I forward to you as you are the Historian of the Church, A file of ^the^ the New York Weekly Herrald, wich this communition. I have sent some to you and President Young by Elder Rockwood and others, & will continue to send as often as I have an opportunity. From the Herrald, you will draw an idea of the signs of the ...
  • Page 4

    Part of Letter to Samuel Brannan, 25 September 1848

    Excerpt:
    [sideways text] Whare is Br Fowler or James Ferguson the Historian of the Battalion if they are in your region remember me to them I want them to write to me please show Br Ferguson the lettr if you see him. Please dont fail of writing to me 28" I am on my way to New York & Phil to visit to churchs Br Appley is quite sick, Elder Jamie died on his way to winter Quarters was buried there
  • Page 2

    Part of Letter from John Wake, 16 May 1896

    Excerpt:
    You will have to put us up-on when, where, & who the ijured party was -- Witnesses &c &c or these disciples, brand us as liars. You say -- 9th Geo -- Smith cut him of good and duties They have a letter Eld Crandle Dunn wrote to Elder Appleby, Dated Aug. 4, /44 Eld Dunn, in this Letter claims -- he was presiding at this time in Michigan -- & he & Harvey Green tried & cut Mr Strang ...
  • Page 1

    Part of Letter to Jesse C. Little, 27 March 1846

    Excerpt:
    New York March 27, 1846. Dear Brother Little. In great haste I sit down to say a few words to you before I leave the City. Had a long in- terview with Mr. Benson yesterday and he exceedingly desires to do business with us he says if he does it for nothing. I was much pleased with my interview with him. He appears to me to be a gentleman. I think it will be well to keep upon good terms with him as far as possible. I would like to have ...
    Dates:
    March 27, 1846
  • Page 3

    Part of Letter to Alexander Badlam, 23 August 1849

    Excerpt:
    -:2:- that room no longer without doubling our rent; so we gave it up and have held no meeting in Boston since. I opened my own hired house for meet- ings on Sunday and one evening in the week, which I have kept up to this day, except part of the time on Sunday at brother Bird's. I had full houses and I baptized a dozen or so. One was Mr. Snow and wife, a Uni- versalist, and a keeper of one of the engines; another was Andrew Delin, from ...
  • Page 5

    Part of Letter to Alexander Badlam, 23 August 1849

    Excerpt:
    -:3:- time they had arrived at Jefferson City, all the gold diggers, 35, were dead but two; also the captain, mates, two clerks, one engineer, pilot, barkeeper, twelve boat hands, and fifteen of the Saints, including child- ren. The names of the Saints, as far as I can recollect, are as follows: From Philadelphia, Adams (tobacconist), his wife and two daughters, bro. Hand, Bro. Lamb, sister Hampton and part of family, sister Brown. From St. Louis, old mother Bokley,
  • Page 2

    Part of Letter to George Albert Smith and Ezra Taft Benson, 22 February 1849

    Excerpt:
    more He made as He had about $600 due & was out of business mostly, & knew not where to get the first dollar A company of rich men stept forward & said that several of their sons were going to the gold diging were young & inexperienced & if Bablam would go with them there they would pay his debts, support his family, fit him out pay his fare there & back again, this offer was made by men who knew him as a business man & believed He had experience in travelling ...
  • Page 2

    Part of Letter to Alexander Badlam, 12 September 1849

    Excerpt:
    half are supposed to be reported 4 died in one family with Cholera in that long Home on Harverd Street East of us. Portland has been the scene of great confusion for several days by a mob of 500 men mostly sailors fishermen fishermen capt & a gathered against one king a Black man who keeps several bad Homes, the parties here fought with camon & small arms. some have been shot dead 20 or 30 wounded two of the Homes burned down The military are finally called out & stoped it King & his ...