Manchester, Lancashire, England

Mentioned in

  • Page 3

    Part of Letter to Ilus F. Carter, 10 July 1840

    Excerpt:
    [upside-down text] Mr Ilus F Carter 118 Bleaker St. corner of Worester New York United States [stamp in red ink] NEW - YORK AUG [illegible] [end of upside-down text] Willford Woodruff July 10th 1840 Manchester England ...
  • Page 4

    Part of Letter from Phebe Whittemore Carter Woodruff and Others, 10 January 1841

    Excerpt:
    [sideways text] Brother Woodruff I have just come to fathers as sister Phebe is writing to you and as she offers me a little space in her letter I cheerfully improve it by saying to yo that I am rejoiced to hear of your prosperity in the cause of Christ and thank you for your kind remembrance of me, and my family and hope we shall ever share in your prayers. we are well at present—hope the Lord will continue to bless you in your mission and hasten the time when ...
  • Page 1

    Part of Letter to Brigham Young, 13 January 1845

    Excerpt:
    Liverpool. Jan 13th 1845 President Young Beloved Brother I essteem it a pleasure to spend a few moments in conversing with you by letter. I have had rather of a slow journey from Nauvoo to Liverpool but have arived at last. came into dock on the 4th inst had a rough voyage some heavy gales but got along without any difficulty we were most of us sea sick a nu[m]ber of days. we had a voyage of 25 days was 5 days in the Channel ...
    Dates:
    January 13, 1845
  • Page 9

    Part of Autobiography Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine Chapter 2

    Excerpt:
    AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF WILFORD WOODRUFF. 129 ness, and that it was with difficulty that they could travel. After spending six days in New York, Elder John Taylor, in company with Elder Theodore Turley and myself sailed out of New York Harbor for Liverpool, on board the packet ship Oxford , on the 19th of December, 1839. We took steerage passage, which cost fifteen dollars each. We had storms and rough weather, but most of the winds were ...
    Dates:
    December 19, 1839 January 11, 1840 January 13, 1840 January 17, 1840
  • Page 10

    Part of Autobiography Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine Chapter 2

    Excerpt:
    130 TULLIDGE'S QUARTERLY MAGAZINE. I was called upon to visit the child. I found it in great distress, writhing in its mother's arms. We laid hands upon it and cast the devil out of it, and the evil spirits had no power over the house- hold afterwards. This was done by the power of God, and not of man. We laid hands upon twenty in Manchester who were sick, and they were mostly healed. On the 21st, I arrived ...
    Dates:
    January 21, 1840 January 22, 1840 February 10, 1840 March 1, 1840 March 2, 1840 March 3, 1840 March 4, 1840
  • Page 12

    Part of Autobiography Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine Chapter 2

    Excerpt:
    132 TULLIDGE'S QUARTERLY MAGAZINE. But the archbishop and council, know- ing well that the laws of England gave free toleration to all religions under the British flag, sent word to the petitioners that if they had the worth of souls at heart as much as they had the ground where hares, foxes and hounds ran, they would not lose so many of their flock. I continued to preach and baptize daily. On the 21st day of March I baptized Elder Thomas Kingston. He was super- intendent of ...
    Dates:
    March 21, 1840 May 18, 1840 May 29, 1840 August 17, 1840
  • Page 2

    Part of Letter to Jedediah M. Grant, 1 August 1845

    Excerpt:
    & other parts of the world their has been a fire of late in Smyrna seven thousand Houses burned, and as to fires in America you know about them. & I should not think strange if Sword followed. Elder Phelps of Boston in his letter says As the great Mormon gun has exploded & been cut off from the church viz G. J. Adams that he is now cut off from the church lecturing against us & is coming to Boston this is no more than ...
  • Page 1

    Part of Letter to Jedediah M. Grant, 23 May 1845

    Excerpt:
    36 Chapel street Liverpool May 23rd 1845. Elder Jedediah M. Grant Beloved Brother Having an oppertunity of forwarding a letter by private conveyance to Philadelphia I gladly improve it by forwarding a few lines to you. I sent you one letter before but have never received a reply I hope however you got the letter. With regard to News with us I may not have a great deal to interest you. I suppose our eyes are turned more towards America for News than the ...
    Dates:
    May 23, 1845