Stockport, Cheshire, England

Mentioned in

  • Page 103

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1840 – December 31, 1840)

    Excerpt:
    Er Thomas Smith rep the Church at Clithero 27 [M] 1 E. 3 P. Also the Church at Chatburn 84 M 1 E. 2 P. 2 T. 1 D. Also the Church at Dawnham ^Dunham^ 20 M 1 T. 1 D. Also the Church at Grindleton 5 M. Er Wm Clayton rep. the Church at Manchester 240 Members 2 E. 5 P. 4 T 1 D ...
  • Page 63

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1841 – December 31, 1842)

    Excerpt:
    Locations By whom Represented Members Elders Priest Teachers Deacons Manchester P. P. Pratt 443 7 15 9 0 Clitheroe Conference H.C. Kimball 318 6 12 13 3 Preston Do P. Melling 675 11 15 13 3 Liverpool J. Taylor 190 9 8 4 3 Isle of Man Do Do 90 2 4 2 0 London Conference L. Snow 137 3 8 4 2
  • Page 63

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1840 – December 31, 1840)

    Excerpt:
    We took the parting hand with Elder Wm Clayton ^{after blessing him}^ & the Saints in Manchester & took the Coach & road through Mackelsfield, Stockport, Congleton, Tunstell, & to Burslem in Staffordshire we spent the night in Burslem with Elder Alfred Cordon at Club buildings Navigation road. According to the Costum of the Country we rode upon the outside of the Coach & we had an ...
    Dates:
    January 22, 1840
  • Page 138

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1845 – December 31, 1846)

    Excerpt:
    September 14, 1845 ~ Sunday Manchester quarterly Conference Met on Sunday the 14th Sept at there usual place of meeting. T[h]ere were present 1 of the quorum of the Twelve 2 High Priest 1 of the Seventies 25 Elders 29 Priest 18 Teachers 5 Deacons Elder Milton Holmes was chosen President Elder Wm Walker Clerk Conference opened by singing & prayer After which we herd the following branches represented Members Elders Priest Teacher Deacon Baptized Manchester 511 10 ...
    Dates:
    September 14, 1845
  • Page 2

    Part of Letter to Phebe Whittemore Carter Woodruff, 29 January 1840

    Excerpt:
    quite splendid with the pulpit or stand in or near the centre of the house which is the english custom. Another thing has attracted my attention while visiting public places in England ie a great plainness of dress with both rich & poor male & female, their cloth may be equ⬦ally as good if not better than that worn in America but they do not appear as tasty & flashy. I think the Americans pattern more after the French than English in their dress. The Encllish deposit their dead in vaults in the church yard & ...