Arthur Milliken

Arthur Milliken (1817-1882) was born 9 May 1817 in Saco, York Co., Maine. He was the son of Edward Millikin and Hannah Andrews. He married Lucy Smith on 4 Jun. 1840. He was baptized about 1835. He and Lucy socialized with Wilford and Phebe Woodruff in Maine and Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois. He died 23 Apr. 1882 near Colchester, McDonough Co., Illinois.

Footnotes

Arthur Millikin (LCP6-KMZ), "Family Tree," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org, accessed 6 Feb. 2022). Arthur Milliken, Wilford Woodruff Papers (https://wilfordwoodruffpapers.org/subjects/arthur-milliken, accessed 10 Feb. 2022). Arthur Millikin, The Joseph Smith Papers (https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/person/arthur-millikin, accessed 17 Jan. 2022).

Mentioned in

  • Page 84

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1838 – December 31, 1839)

    Excerpt:
    concerning the case of Brother Brewster I was one that opposed his ordination & I was much surprised that both the chairman & clerk did not do the same instead of urging it forward for Br Brewster maintained the same principle & possessed the same spirit for which he was cut off from the church in Kirtland by the high council & even in this case he came forward & demanded the High & Holy priesthood at our hands in the in the name of Jesus Christ I did not consider this to be ...
    Dates:
    March 13, 1839 March 14, 1839 March 15, 1839 March 16, 1839
  • Page 87

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1841 – December 31, 1842)

    Excerpt:
    was nigh unto death had a relaps of her Sickness & also informed me that Br Webster had returned, & visited them. It seemed from the Import of the letter that it had been through a great struggle, exercise of faith, & the mercy of God that Eunice was in the land of the living. I immediately carried her case befor the Lord & plead in her behalf & I was blessed with a testimony that she would recover & that I should soon see ...
    Dates:
    July 1, 1841 July 2, 1841
  • Page 136

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1843 – December 31, 1844)

    Excerpt:
    September 14, 1843 ~ Thursday 13 14th I arose refreshed by sleep took Breakfast with Mother, Mary & Rhoda Foss then got into a waggon with Fabyan, & rode to sister Foss whare I saw Elizabeth, then Rode to Br Luther Scammans, saw Luther & the children & Mother Scammans but Rhoda was out, but she soon come in & the manner she shooked ...
    Dates:
    September 14, 1843 September 15, 1843
  • Page 137

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1843 – December 31, 1844)

    Excerpt:
    Sept 15 Chamber whare Phebe has spent so many days with me, but it was vacant the want there, it was gloomy. I turned away. I went to see the bark mill or New wind mill they had built it is not large enough & it dont do well. Fabyan gave me soul leather for two pair of shoes for myself & Phebe & Willy & upper leather, to take home I walked out in the orchard no apples ripe, seasons growing ...
    Dates:
    September 16, 1843
  • Page 138

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1843 – December 31, 1844)

    Excerpt:
    well & sends her love to willy I spent the eve- ning conversing with Fabyan & Rhoda & Mother about Mormonism the principles of it the gather[in]g &c they seem to understand it putty well Mother says if we follow the good spirit of the Blessed Jesus we will do well. The two Scam- mans & Fabyan are saints in Principle Arthur thinks it would be a good time to build up a church here. we had prayers together ...
    Dates:
    September 17, 1843
  • Page 140

    Part of Journal (January 1, 1843 – December 31, 1844)

    Excerpt:
    much love to Phebe & we rode to Luther Scamons & I here I found Rhoda abed with a little son all quite bright & smart making them four children 3 sons & 1 daughter I took dinner with them, & here Parted with Father for the last time. He thinks some of comeing out west & bringing leather with him in the spring. at 3 oclok In the afternoon I parted with Rhoda, who the same as
  • Page 2

    Part of Letter from Phebe Whittemore Carter Woodruff, 2 July 1840

    Excerpt:
    could not sit up to have my bed made, I was brought verry low in consequence of my situation little Sarah Emma was verry sick at the same time both of our lives were nearly dispaired of but through the mercy of God I got some better so that as soon as my house was called done I went into it, it had no door window or loft in it, and it was a hard matter for me to get it done any way they seamed unwilling to do it, I had ...
  • Page 4

    Part of Letter to George A. Smith from Bathsheba W. Smith, 15 June 1844

    Excerpt:
    June 16 Dear Wilford I have come down to sister Smith before I milk my cow lest her letter should be gone to the office to tell you that we are all comfortably well at present the we have all had very bad colds[.] Susan & Phebe have been quite sick Sister Eunice health is a little better. I received 5 dolls from you from Newark bought about 4 dolls worth of lumber paid balis one & now brother
    Dates:
    June 16, 1844