Journal (January 1, 1847 – December 31, 1853)

Document Transcript

Page 1

WILFORD
WOODRUFF
6
JAN. 1 1847
TO
DEC. 31 1853

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1847 to 1853. 6 years
472 Pages
^Wilford Woodruff^

6


January 1st 1847,
to
December 31st 1853.

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I looked over my Journals commencing with AD 1834 ending
with AD 1846 Making thirteen (13) years during which time
I have travled sixty one thousand six hundred & ninety two miles
crossed the Atlantic Ocean four times travled through England
Scotland & Wales and on six Islands of the sea through (61.6.92)
twenty of the United States several times and the Canidas
Held one thousand sixty nine meetings. (1069) Held eighty six
(86) conferences. One hundred & twenty three councils (123)
Baptized six hundred & thirty four (634) persons And assisted
in the baptism of hundreds of others. was baptized for thirty
six Dead friends (36). Confirmed eight hundred & thirteen
(813). Ordained two pPatriarchs (2) Nine Bishops (9) Three
High Priest 3. Three Seventies 3. One hundred fifty six
Elders (156) One hundred forty two Priests (142) sixty three Teachers
(63) And thirteen Deacons. (13) I have Administered by anoi-
nting
and laying on of hands unto three hundred and sixty
four sick persons (364) many of which were healed. I Blessed
(194) one hundred and ninety four children. I Married seven
couple (7) I planted fifty one churches (51) esstablished
seventy seven preaching places (77). Had ten mobs rise against
me 10. I recorded thirty of the Prophet Joseph's sermons
(30) And twenty five of the quorum of the Twelve Apostles (25)
I wrote one thousand and forty Letters (1040) Recieved six hundred
& ninety nine letters (699) I collected for the building of the
Temples of the Lord in kirtland & Nauvoo one thousand six
hundred seventy four dollars ($1674) Also five thousand dollars
for Assisting in the printing of the works of the Latter Day Saints
($5000) I procured two hundred & five subscribers for the
periodicals published by the Saints (205) I printed the
Times and Seasons And Neighbor in co with Elder Taylor two
years. I printed twenty five hundred copies of the Millenum
Star
at Liverpool (2,500) And Published three thousand copies
of the Book of Doctrins & Covenants (3000) And secured the
copy wright at Stationeres Hall London. I printed three
thousand Hymn Books (3000) and twenty thousand of
the Proclamation called the proclamation of the
Twelve Apostles. (20,000) During the Above period
I was ordained to the office of Teacher, Priest, Elder
member of the second quorum of Seventies the first quorm
of seventies
And one of the Twelve Apostles Recieved
my Anointing sealing & endowments from under the
Hands of the Apostles Brigham Young & Heber C. Kimball
by order of Joseph the prophet


[4 lines blank]


I assisted the Twelve in ordaining about two hundred 200
Elders & seventies at one time in Nauvoo which was not
recorded in my Journal & not named in the above number

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WILFORD WOODRUFFS
JOURNAL
FOR
1847

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~ Friday


^friday^ JAN 1st 1847 I spent the day aranging my Journals I spent
the evening with Mrs Woodruff and sister Taylor At a feast
prepared by Br and sister Smoot I administered to 2 that were sick


~ Saturday


2nd I spent the day at home Father Woodruff was sick


~ Sunday


3rd Sunday I preached At Br Vancotts House to that ward
I laid hands upon one sick person and blessed one child


~ Monday


4th I spent the day at home, and evening at Br A. O. Smoo[t]


~ Tuesday


5th I spent this day halling Hay I sent 3 bushels of Meal
in a large salt sack to Br Mercer in the upper Herd
I attended council with the Twelve in the evening


~ Wednesday


6th The coldest day we have had this year in the
morning the Thermometer stood 2 degrees below
zero I spent the day at home Attended meeting in the
evening And ordained A. O. Smoot A Bishop And then
Preached at Sister Taylors


~ Thursday


7th It was colder to day than yesterday it was 8 degrees below zer[o]
I spent the day at home And attended the High council
in the evening. Retired to Bed And dreamed I was with
the Saints Among the Indians. in Peace but suddenly
one came at me in a hostile manner to kill me they shot
at us but no one killed And I awoke & it was a dream


~ Friday


8th It was 20 degrees warmer to day but still vary cold I run
my stove pipe through the roof & put some turf upon the House
Br Fowler returned home this evening being gone 20 da[ys]
Had putty good luck, considering all things He brought
Home 40 gal Honey, 900 lbs pork 40 lb lard 20 lbs Butte[r]
one yoke Beef cattle and sundry other articles


~ Saturday


9th Mercury fell 10 degrees below zero we sold one ox
to Br Rockwood at 2 1/2 cts per lb his meat wait was 893 lb
Amounting to $22.32 1/2 during the evening I took a walk with
Elders Young, Kimball, H Stout & others conversed upon a
variety of subjects.


I went to bed; fell asleep
And dreamed some Indians came in to my house with Axes
with the intent to kill me I got away from them went
into the street And there two men one an Indian stabed me
with knives in the side I Hollowed murder and some
came to my assistance And I awoke. these dreams mean
sumthing some person or persons are plotting against my
life And I am warned against the plots of my enemies


~ Sunday


10th Sunday I met the Saints in our ward O Pratt addr
essed them with an interesting discourse and I followed
we had a good meeting. I again attended meeting in the
evening And preached to the people and had the spirit of
God
several of the brethren spoke. I spoke some upon
the resurrection

Page 12

~ Monday


11th I met in council with the Twelve at Br Bensons and
spent the day we had a good time. we spoke upon the
principle of our lives being threatend by our enemies &
prayed that we might ever be deliverd from there hands


~ Tuesday


12th I spent the day butchering a fat ox we me met in
council with the Twelve


~ Wednesday


13th I cupt up Beef and pork today Attended to the duties of the
family I attended a meeting in the evening at Br Ensigns


~ Thursday


14th I attended a council of the Twelve at Elder Kimballs
[FIGURE 7] [FIGURE 7] we had an interesting meeting. A Revelation was
given concerning the organization of the camp of
Israel
which will be written on another page of this journal


~ Friday


15th I met in council with the Twelve at Br Bensons And
conversed about the organizing of the camp of Israel
the time has now come when the camp of Israel must be
organized according to the order and law of God for there
peace, safety, and salvation. There are many things of Interest
transpire in the councils of the Twelve Apostles which I do
not write in this Journal As Elder Willard Richards is
presant at the councils, And is the recorder And Historian of
the Church And writes all these things which will appear in
the general Church History. There was A severe snow storm
this day. Ant night I went into the Council House with President
Young & several Bishops And made doors and plastered up
the House And worked untill near midnight


~ Saturday


16th A cold day yet the sun shines pleasent I drew two loads
of Hay And went into council at night with the Twelve
and the Presidents of the seventies And we had much
interesting teaching from President Young. The revelation
And word of the Lord recieved on the 14th was this
day presented before the High council and accepted
it was presented to night before presidents of the seventies
And accepted by them. The question was asked
president Young if the quorums of seventies should
not be filled up while He said not while there was men
enough belonging to the quorum in good standing alive on
the earth their places should not be filled by others
while treating upon the principle of Adoption He said some
men were afraid they would loose some glory if they
were sealed to one of the Twelve And did not stand
alone And have others sealed to them President
Young said there kingdom consisted of their own
posterity And it did not diminish that at all but
by being sealed to one of the Twelve but ownly
bound them by that perfect chain according to the
law of God and order of Heaven that will bind
the righteous from Adam to the last Saint And
Adam will claim us all as members of his kingdom
we doing [being] his children

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He gave some interesting teaching concerning the rights
of men & the dealings of men with there wives and
children, the raising of posterity, purity, Holiness &c
that if A wise and proper course was taken in the
begeting and raising of children that they would
soon become pure & Holy And be administered
to by Angels
&c And many other things did
the Apostle teach


~ Sunday


17th Sunday A cold day I preached to A congregation in
Bishops Everetts ward I Attended council in the
Evening with the Twelve, High council & Bishops And
Had an interesting time two peaces was read from
Col Cane published in the Pennsylvania Papers, concerning
His stay among us


~ Monday


178th [FIGURE] Monday The Thermometer stood this day
16 1/2 degrees below 0 zero I think as cold weath[er]
As I ever experienced But As cold weather As it was
In company with several others I dug earth out of
the bank And coverd the roof of my house up
This was An important day in the History of this Churc[h]
in one respect President Brigham Young met with
his company or family organisation or those who
had been adopeted unto him or were to be, & organized
then into A company out of which may grow a people
that may yet be called the tribe of Brigham. His
teaching to his company was much unto edifycation
I cannot now write but few of the words which He spake
He said no man should come into his company to work
iniquity they should break of from all there sins And
they did enter into a covenant with uplifted Hands to
Heaven with President Young And each other to walk
in all the ordinances & commandments of the Lord
our God. President Young said that He new that any
man who would put his money to usury in the cause
of God would recieve an hundred fold And many things
of Interest was spoken President Young company numb[ered]
about 300 men


~ Tuesday


189th [FIGURE] {The tribe of Wilford Woodruff was organized this day}


President Heber C Kimball organized
His family company this night At the
Council House consisting of about 200 persons
I, Wilford Woodruff organized my family company
this night At my own House consisting of 40 Men mostly
Head men of families. Those that Joined me entered into
a covenant with uplifted Hands to Heaven to keep all the
commandments & statutes of the Lord our God And
to sustain me in my office the following are the nam[es]
of those who were present with me in this organization
Wilford Woodruff, Aphek Woodruff, John Fowler,
Abraham O Smoot, William C. A. Smoot, John Grierson,
Chancy W. Porter, John Benbow, Simeon Blanchard,
Jacob Burnham, Little John Utley Samuel Turnbow
Eligah F. Sheets, Jacob F Secrist, Benjamin Abers,

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Andrew J Allen, Ezra Clark, Edward Stephvenson,
Zerah Pulsipher, John M Wolley Albert Dewey
Wm Stewart, Thomas Clark, Hezekiah Peck,
being 24 persons in all that were present, the remainder
were Absent on business. we dismissed and parted in good
spirits & feelings I went to bed and fell asleep And dreamed
[FIGURE] that I was {[big] with child and} ready to {be delivered} which was A singular dream


~ Wednesday


Jan 1920th I met in council with the Twelve at Br Kimballs
A part of the time was spent in Appointing officers in the
organization of Presidents Youngs company. towards evening
Br Harrison Burgess Arived from Nauvoo with the Mail
And all other business was laid aside to search for news
we recieved several Bundles of news papers from nearly all
parts of the U. S. A. & many letters from friends Abroad And
3 Nos of the Stars from Liverpool Edited by Elder O. Hyde
And we had quite A treat


~ Thursday


201st I spent this day in council with the Twelve And search-
ing out the news of the day. I attended the High council in
the evening with the Twelve & Bishops But was quite unwell
with cold and sore throat


21st
The following is A true copy of A Revelation given dated
Winter Quarters camp of Israel Jan 14th 1847 [Doctrine and Covenants 136:1-10]


The word and will of the Lord concerning the camp of Israel
In their journeyings to the west


Let all the people of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day
Saints, and those who journey with them, be organized into companies
with a covenant and promise to keep all the commandments and
statutes of the Lord our God: Let the companies be organized
with Captains of Hundreds, Captains of Fifties, and Captains of Tens
with A President & his two councillors at their head, under
the direction of the Twelve Apostles: And this shall be our covenant
that we will walk in all the ordinances of the Lord.


Let each company provide themselves with all the Teams, waggons
provisions, clothing, and other necessaries for the journey that they
can. When the companies are organized let them go to with
their might to prepare for those who are to tarry.


Let each company with their Captains, And Presidents, decide
how many can go next spring; then choose out a sufficient
number of able bodied and expert men, to take teams, seeds,
and Farming utensils, to go as Pioneers, to prepare for puting
in spring crops.


Let each company bear an equal
proportion, according to the dividend of their property, in taking
the poor, the widows, the Fatherless, and the families of those
who have gone into the Armey, that the cries of the widow
and the Fatherless come not up into the ears of the Lord against
this people.


Let each company prepare houses, and fields
for raising grain, for those who are to remain behind this season,
and this is the will of the Lord concerning his people; Let every
man use all his influence and property, to remove this people
to the place whare the Lord shall locate a stake of Zion;

Page 15

And if ye do this with a pure heart in all faithfulness, ye shall
be blessed, you shall be blessed in your flocks, and in your
herds, and in your fields, and in your houses, and in your famili[es]
Let my servants Ezra T. Benson and Erastus Snow organize a
company, and let my servants Orson Pratt and Wilford Woodr[uff]
organize A company: Also let my servants Amasa Lyman and
George A Smith organize a company and Appoint Presidents
and Captains of hundreds and of fifties and of tens:
And let my servants that have been Appointed go and teach
this my will to the Saints, that they may be ready to go to
a land of peace. [Doctrine and Covenants 136:11-16]


Go thy way and do as I have told you; and fear not thine
enemies; for they shall not have power to stop my work.
Zion shall be redeemed in mine own due time time, and if any
man shall seek to build up himself and seeketh not my council
he shall have no power, and his folley shall be made manifes[t]
seek ye and keep all your pledges one with another and covet
not that which is thy brothers. Keep yourselves from evi[l]
to take ^not^ the name of thy God in vane; for I am the Lord your
God, even the God of your Fathers, the God of Abraham,
and of Isaac and of Jacob. I am he who led the children
of Israel
out of the Land of Egypt and my arm is streched
out in the last days to save my people Israel cease to contend
one with another. Cease to speak evil one of another.
Cease drunkenness, and let your words tend to edeyfing one
another. If thou borrowest of thy neighbor, thou shalt
restore that which thou hast borrowed, and if theyou canst
not repay, then go straitway, and tell thy neighbor lest he
condemn thee. If thou shalt find that which thy neighbor
has lost, thou shalt make diligent search, till thou shalt
deliver it to him again. Thou shall be diligent in preserving
what thou hast, that thou mayest be a wise steward; for
it is the free gift of the Lord thy God, and thou art his steward
If thou art merry, praise the Lord, with singing,
with music, with dancing and with a prayer of
praise and thanksgiving. If thou art sorrowful call on
the Lord thy God with supplication, that your souls may
be joyful. Fear not thine enemies for they are in mine
hands and I will do my pleasure with them. My people
must be tried in all things, that they may be prepared to
recieve the glory that I have for them, even the glory of Zion.
And he that will not bear chastizment, is not worthy of
my Kingdom; Let him that is ignorant, learn wisdom
by humbling himself, and calling upon the Lord his God, that
his eyes may be opened that he may see, and his ears opened
that He may hear, for my spirit is sent forth into the worl[d]
to enlighten the humble And contrite, and to the condemna[t]ion
of the ungodly.


Thy brethren have rejected you and
your testimony, even the Nation that has driven you out; and
now cometh the day of their calamity, even the days of
sorrow like a woman that is taken in travel [travail]; and their
sorrow shall be great, unless they spedily repent! ^yea vary spedily^ for they
killed the prophets, and they that were sent unto them,
And they have shed innocent Blood, which crieth from

Page 16

the ground against them; Therefore marvel not at these
things, for ye are not yet pure: thou canst not yet bear
my glory, But thou shalt behold it, if ye are faithful
in keeping all my words that I have given you from the
days of Abraham Adam to Abraham; from Abraham
to Moses, from Moses to Jesus and the Apostles and
from Jesus and his Apostles to Joseph Smith, whom
I did call upon by mine Angels, my ministering servants
and by mine own voice out of the Heavens, to bring forth
my work; which foundation he dayid lay, and was faithful
and I took him to myself. Many have marvelled becaus
of his death, but it was needful that He should seal his tes-
timony with his blood, that he might be honored and
the wicked might be condemned.


Have I not deliverd you from your enemies, ownly in that
I have left a witness of my name? Now, therefore, harken,
O ye people of my Church; and ye Elders, listen together
you have received my kingdom, be diligent in keeping
all my commandments, lest judgment come upon you,
and your faith fail you, and your enemies triumph over
you. [Doctrine and Covenants 136:36-42]


So no more at present Amen and Amen.


~ Friday


212nd Friday I met in council with the Twelve


~ Saturday


223rd I spent the day at home But attended the council of
the seventies in the evening with the Twelve & the
quorum of the Twelve with President Young at the Head
set for going forth in the dance the persons that took
the floor to set the pattern were as follows Brigham Young
Heber C. Kimball Wilford Woodruff & Ezra T Benson of
the Twelve, & Joseph Young & O. P. Rockwood of the
Seventies. After we were aranged on the floor President Young
Bowed before the Lord with his Brethren And dedicated
ourselves & the House & the meeting unto the Lord which
was set as A pattern we then went forth in the
dance And spent a few moments together had plesant
music we then dismissed & return home


~ Sunday


234th Sunday I preached in our own ward Administered
to 3 that were sick during the evening I Attended the
Marriage cerimony under the hands of president Young
Between Elijah F. Sheets & Margarett Hutchingson. I attended
the High council in the evening & Had an interview with
Bishop Miller


~ Monday


245th I met in council with the Twelve & it was decided
that O Pratt go to Pisgah & Garden grove & E. T. Benson
go to Punkas to organize the saints And I act as
treasurer for Br Pratt while He is gone. Mrs Woodruff
[FIGURE 1] and myself watched with Sister Sheets And I wrote
25th A letter During the time to Br Albert Stratton


~ Tuesday


26th I spent the day at home & night at Br Pulsipher
& had a plesent time in conversing about times in past
days

Page 17

~ Wednesday


267th I spent the day at home & in the evening I attended
meeting with our ward & Br Taylors word together Br
Phelps Addressed the meeting And I followed him & we
had a good time


~ Thursday


278th [FIGURE] This was A vary busy day I let Br Burgess have
my team to go to Hunsakers ferry I Also fitted
out Br Luce with two teams to go after corn I paid
him $11 to buy corn with. we had a snow storm
during the night After Aranging my business, in company
with Mrs Woodruff & Sisters Taylor & Smoot I went to
the Council House in company with the quorum
of the Twelve & Seventies, we spent the day in the
worship of God by prayer, singing Music & going forth
in the dance together before the Lord we were merry
and rejoiced before the Lord. The High council met
at 6 oclok at 8 oclok The Twelve with their families
again met & went forth in the dance untill 2 oclok in
the morning & had a good time. {Joseph [Herring] who had threatened my life was there}


~ Friday


289th I was unwell this morning George Miller started
this morning for Punka {Joseph [Herring] is threatening my life} to {[day] [illegible shorthand]}
I spent the day at home. During the evening I met
with some of the Twelve & with the singers & joined
29th In the singing, music & dancing and we felt to praise
the Lord in our hearts.


~ Saturday


2930th I spent the day at home


~ Sunday


301st Sunday I Preached in the morning to a congregation
in our own ward No 14th in the afternoon at the Council
House
to President Youngs ward & others And had
liberty of speech. I Attended council in the evening
with the High council & Bishop's. I watched with Sister
Sheets in the latter part of the night and she died at
31st Monday 30 minutes past 3 oclock


~ Monday


31st ^Feb 1st^ Monday I spent a part of the day at Br Sheets


~ Tuesday


Feb 2nd I met in council with the Twelve at President
Youngs. He was quite out of health we recieved a mail
to day of many papers and letters I attended the
[FIGURE 12] M. T. S. funeral of Sister Sheets. It was A cold day


~ Wednesday


3rd I spent the day at home and evening with Dr
Richards, Bishop Smoot, & others & at sundry places


~ Thursday


34th I spent the day at home. In the evening I
called my company together And organized them according
5thto the pattern given. I appointed with the voice of the
people A. O. Smoot capt of 100 Zera Pulsipher capt of 50
And John Benbow, E. F Sheets, C. W. Porter, John ^M^ Wooley,
Thomas Clark, David Evans, Robert C Petty and Andrew J.
Stewart
captains of Tens. we had a good meeting I then
visited the meeting of the High council Herd President Young
deliver an address to the High council and Beef committee

Page 18

~ Friday


Feb 5th Friday
[FIGURE 14] This was an interesting day to the camp of Israel
at an early hour the band of music entered my
carriage and rode through the city of winter
quarters
playing so sweetly that it rend the air. the
quorum of Twelve set in council the fore part of the
day at 2 oclock AM [PM] The silver grays met at the Council
House
, the company of silver grays consisted of all
the old men in the camp of Israel over 50 years
of age they were divided into 2 companies as the house
could not hold them all in one day, the quorum of
the Twelve met with them at the opening of the
meeting. Remarks were made by president Young
A Hymn was sung And Prayer by the Patriarch
John Smith After which they feasted together and
then they went forth in the dance praising God in their
hearts. It was truly an interesting sight to see the old
men and women some nearly a hundred years old go forth
and dance together in fulfillment of the ancient prophets
the quorum of the twelve spent the Afternoon and
evening with them. Father and Mother Woodruff was
among the number. I spent the time plesantly


~ Saturday


6th I spent this day at home was quite unwell A part of
the evening with Dr Richards reading the news of the
day returned home and spent the night I got a letter
for Father Woodruff from [blank]


~ Sunday


7th Sunday I spent the day at home & met in council in
the evening with the twelve


~ Monday


8th I spent the day aranging affairs about the House


~ Tuesday


9th Br Fowler left for Mo to day


~ Wednesday


10th I spent the Afternoon & evening at the Council
House
in company with Mr[s] Woodruff at the Bishops
meeting social recreation &c


~ Thursday


11th I spent A part of the day with the Twelve in council
we decided to send up 20 or 30 men to Lathrops Herd


~ Friday


12. I spent the day in assisting the company for in making
preperations to go to the Herd


~ Saturday


13 The company for going to the Herd consisted of about
30 men with 3 Baggage waggons left the city about night
for their journey. the object of this journey was to go
to the Herd & visit the camp of the Soux Indians
and make a demand of them of some 20 Horses which
they had stolen from our Herdsman


~ Sunday


14th Sunday I attended meeting in the morning with Elder
G. A. Smith at Bishops Hunters ward Br Smith preached I
followed had a good time. At 1 oclok I met with Bishop
Spencers ward & preached to them; at early candlelight
I met with my own ward or Bishop Smoots & preache [page torn]
to them & had a good time

Page 19

~ Monday


15th I met in council with the President & council
captains of Hundreds, fifties, and tens, to further
the organization of the camp of Israel I recieved an
appointment to go to Kegg Creek with Br Smoot to
organize the people ther one of the chiefs of the Otoes
was present this morning. In the evening I met with
the quorum of the Twelve & others to learn to take the
proper steps in dancing


~ Tuesday


16th I have A vary severe cold & horseness this was one of
the most interesting days of my life I attended the family
meeting of President Brigham Young And he addressed
the meeting at great length during the day and evening
upon many interesting principles. There were present of
the quorum of the Twelve B Young H. C. Kimball
O. pratt W. Richards W. Woodruff G A. Smith A Lyman &
E. T. Benson. After singing and prayer by President Young
He Arose to address the meeting & remarked that He
Had invited the Twelve to be present though they
were not of his family, yet I wish them to act free and
speak such things as the Lord shall give them.


Let me state a principle by which you may contemplate
much. For the want of understanding many have suffered
jealeousies to arise which afflicted theire minds with [borrow[ed]]
troubles and uneasiness fearing the Lord loved some others
more than themselves, this I have sinceeen in the Church
ever since its rise. it was manifest in Kirtland when the
first Bishop was ordained this jealeous feeling was manifest
some wondered if the Lord would think enough of them
to ordain them a Bishop Father Morley and others that were
present can bare record of this fact. And when the Twelve
were chosen the same feelings exhisted & in fact I will not
except all of them for some of them manifested the same
feelings when the Bishops were ordained. this spirit has been
the overthrow of many in this Church And in fact upon
this principle thousands have fallen in all ages. The Lord
gives to everry man all the power influence and authority
that He can wield in righteousness and all that his goodnes
& faithfulness merits then why should jealousies arise or
what benefit can arise by suffering such feelings to exhist
none at all, but those that cherish such feelings commence
trying to pull down every one that is prospering or gaining
influence as Cain did instead of building up & nourishing
every promising tree & thereby prove himself worthy & show
to his brethren & to God that He loves the cause & by his
passive spirit that He is not ownly willing that others should
should prosper & gain influence & that he actually loves to
see them prosper for then He does all that he can through hims[e]-
lf, he helps advance it through others although they recieve
the honor of it and he still be aware of it such a man will
never be forgotten and to his honor glory and exhaltation there
shall be no end.


There is another principlye that has caused
considerable uneasiness and trouble. ie the Idea of some mens having
more wives than one, such tremendious fears take hold of some
that they hardly know how to live still they cant die, Begin to

Page 20

whisper and talk around am actually afraid to go on a mission for
fear some man will be sealed to my wife, & when they return
home some will be babbing about, you dont know but what you
have got another mans wife, are afraid to speak to a young
woman for fear that she belongs to somebody els or for fear some
body els wants her. (others deny the faith as they think but they
never had much) and say that it is all of the devil &c such foolish-
nish ought not to be cherished among a wise & prudent people. Admitting
the Lord created the same number of women as men at the begining
and were commanded to multiply & replenish the earth & to fill
up the measure of there creation in righteousness; the question is
did they do it answer No, they soon disobeyed every commandme-
nt
& plunged themselves into wickedness and rendered themselves
unworthy to raise up seed unto the Lord & in fact used every means
in there power to cut of[f] life & hinder woman answering the end for
which they were created; nine tenth of them would rebel against the
vary thing he was created to do. Hence you see the propriety of the
Lord's calling upon men who bears the priesthood to take to themselves
wives from among the daughters of men & raise up a righteous seed unto
him that he might fill up the measure of there creation and hasten
the consumation of his purposes in righteousness in this dispensation
according to his words previously spoken through his servents the
prophets. But those who suffer fears & jealouses to aris in there bosoms
either back right out or get to be mighty Righteous & for fear that
they are sleeping with other mens wife—they kick up a dust or
broil at home & perhaps abuse there own companion through jealousy
then go off to some woman that does not understand what is right
or wrong & tell her that he has she cannot be saved without a man
and he has almighty power & can exhalt & save her & likely tell that
there is no harm for them to sleep together before they are sealed then
go to some doe head of an Elder & get him to say the ceremony, all
done without the knowledge of the Authority of this Church.
this is not right, & will not be suffered. The God I serve will reward
every ^man^ openly without his being under the necessity of going secretly
& privately palming himself on the credulity of innocent ignorant
females. Such jealeousies do exhist & were I to say to the Elders
you now have the liberty to build up your kingdoms one half of
them would lie, swear, steal, & fight like the vary devil, to get men
& women sealed to them they would even try to pass right
by me & go to Joseph thinking to get between him & the Twelve
some have already tryed to used an influence against me. but such
jealeousies & selfishness shall be stoped & if the brethren do not
stop it I will blow it to the four winds by making them all come
& be sealed to me & I to my Father & He and all this Church to
Joseph. when I go asstray & give wrong council & lead this people
astray, then is time enough to pull me down & then God will
remove me as he has done all others who has turned from
the faith. But to return, I have gatherd a number of families
around me by the law of adoption & seal of the covenant
according to the order of Adoption the priesthood and others
have done likewise it being the means of salvation left to bring
us back to God. but had the keys of the priesthood been retained
& handed down from father to son throughout all generations
up to the present time then there would have been no necessity
of the law of Adoption for we would have all been included
in the covenant without it & would have been legal heirs

Page 21

instead of being heirs according to promise. the pristhood is
eternal without the begining of days or end of life as the Apostle
has expressed it [Hebrews 7:1-3] but man through Aposticy which is entire disobedi-
ance has lost or suffered the keys & privileges of the Priesthood
to be taken away from them & they left to wander in darkness
and practice all manner of wickedness untill thousands became the
vessals of wrath & were doomed to destruction for as long as men
are without the Priesthood they continue to wander from God
& never retrace their steps untill it is done by the priesthood, & the
Idea of the Saints being led by fals Prophets is just a notion accor-
ding to the light in which they view them all the fals prophets we
have are men who have turned aside from the truth.


The man is the head & God of the woman, but let him act like a
God in virteous principles & God like conversation, walk and
deportment & such men will continue to gain influence & power
and advance in Glory to all eternity. But should they use there
power in wickedness as a tyrant they soon will be called to
render an account of their stewardship. if not found worthy
they will be hurled down to perdition & their family & kingdom
be given to another that is more worthy. Some say that a
woman cannot be saved without a man, neither can a man
without a woman. Br Joseph said he had taught the Twelve
all that he knew concerning the order of the kingdom but the
difficulty was they could not remember it as he told them, but
when it was necessary they would not be at a loss for under-
standing; & I bear record to the truth of his word before God
this day that I always had an understanding & evry thing
was brought to my mind just as he taught them to us. All the
ordinances of the Temple & building of the Alter &c. came to me just
right when they were to be attended to & could we now know
Br Hyde, Pratt & Taylor's feelings you would say that they could
read a man through as soon as they cast there eyes upon him.
The Apostle Paul while speaking of the Fathers & the Ancients
said that thay without us could not be made perfect [Hebrews 11:40] there
was a lack in his day & still will be to all eternity untill the
chain of that Priesthood is restored & evry spirit take a taber-
nacle
that was foreordained according to the dispensation of the
will of God. I am entitled to the keys of the Priesthood
according to linage & Blood, so is Brother H. C. Kimball & many others
Have taken kingly power & grades of the Priesthood. this we
would have taught in the Temple if time had permitted.
Joseph Smith was entitled to the keys of the Priesthood according
to Blood still He was the fourth son. But when we get anot[h]er
Temple built then we will teach you concerning these things
suffice it to say that I will extend the chain of the Prist-
hood back through the Apostolic dispensation to Father Adam
just as soon as I can get a temple built. Jesus could have
restored the order of the Pristhood in his day & brought in
the Millenium if the people would have harkened to his inst-
ructions but they rebelled & would not, & it was for this
cause that Jesus told them that all the Blood that had Been
shed from Righteous Abel down to Zechariah the Prophet should
be required at there hands.


I have a request to make of my family & that is that they
(esspecially old people) omit calling me their Father. Call
me Brother Brigham. I shall feel better when you do

Page 22

for I do not consider that I am worthy of that Appelation
Father in the Priesthood implies the great head, the term
would be proper to Father Adam. Jesus had refference
to the same thing when He told his deciples not to call any
man Father on earth for their Father was in heaven. [Matthew 23:9]
The seal of the covenant that I have been speaking off [of]
to day was what the Apostle saw previous to the destruction
of the wicked when the Angel was commanded not to fear pour
out the vials of wrath on the wicked untill the saints were sealed
in thereir forehead & when this was done they all became Father
Adams family. Those that are Adopted into my family & take me
for their councellor if I continue faithful I will preside over
them throughout all Eternity. I will stand at thereir head, and
Joseph will stand at the head of this Church & will be there
President Prophet & God to the People in this dispensation. when
we Locate I will settle my family down in the order & teach them
there duty they will then have to provide temporal Blessings for
me instead of my boarding from 40 to 50 persons as I now
do. I will administer in spiritual Blessings to them. I expect to
live in the House of the Lord & recieve & administer ordinan-
ces to my Brethren & for the dead all the year round.


President H. C. Kimball arose & addressed the meeting at some
moments. Bore testimony that what President Young had
said was true & rejoiced to meet with them &c.


Br O. Pratt also addressd the meeting a few moments
bore testimony to the truth & also rejoiced to meet with
them. There was then an intermission untill after supper
The table was well furnished & supplyed. 40 persons could
be seated at the Table at a time. the men were seated to the
right with there companion oposite them, commencing with the
Twelve President Young at there head, then in order the adopted
children begining with the 1st that was adopted. the Band
& choir kept their seats, & continued there sweet strains of music
while the guest were partaking of the rich festival. While at the
table Brother Thomas Wolsay & John ^H.^ Tippets entered the
House they came direct fromt the from the Mormon Battalion
280 miles south of Santa fe on the River Riogrand on the 10th
of Nov 1847. they piloted 56 sick men to Fort Purbolo whare
Capt Brown esstablishment were stationed from there
came in on Pack Mules were 50 days on the way. were taken
prisoners twice by the Indians, once was sentenceed to death
by the Pawnees were 30 days without bread & 5 days witho
ut much of any thing to eat. Brought a package of 137 letters
Brought good account from fort Purbulow but rather
unfavorable from the Battalion their faces were coverd with
hair & there persons resembled a mountaineer. it was a
miracle that the lives of the men were saved from the
Indians & cold. They were seated to the table in the
guardb [garb] they arived in. their arival produced no small stir
through the camp. men & women came in all directions
to enquire after there friends in the Armey. After the men
were refreshed we went into council with them & they rehears
ed the situation of the Battallion that they had been on
half rations for three weeks when they left them & no pro[sp]-
ects of more than half rations should they attempt to cross [page torn]
mountains this winter. However report reached sSant[a fe] [page torn]

Page 23

they arived that the Battalion had taken the Alpasio a strong
hold between the Riogrand and the Mountains without the
fireing of a gun. if this report is true the Bat[talion] will have an
abundance of support & likely take up winter quarters
many other remarks were made & President Young said that
if they had harkened to his council not a man of them would
have fallen but would have returned to their friends in
perfect safety.


At 7 oclok we returned to the Council
House
. found the Saints rejoicing in what had heard through
the day. Elder Isaac Morley said that his soul was filled
with rejoicing to see the beauty & harmony of the family
connecting links of the Priesthood that had been taught
this day: And when I look at the family connexion
I cannot but acknowledge him my leader in all things
& he looking to Joseph the Martered Prophet who has gone
to prepare the way for us, and can do more for us than
he could do if he was here. This Pristhood spoken off
if from all Eternity & will lead to eternity & will exhalt
the Saints to be Gods through faithfulness.


President Young arose & continued his remarks upon the
law of adoption granted the brethren the privilege of asking
questions when they did not fully comprehend his meaning
The Lord introduced the law of adoption for the benefit of the
children of men as a school master to bring them back into the
covenant of the Priesthood. This Principle I am aware is
not clearly understood by many of the Elders in this Church
at the present time as it will here after be: And I confess that
I have had ownly a smattering of those things but when it
is necessary I will attain to more knowledge on the subject
& consequently will be enabled to teach & practice more and
will in the mean time glorify God the bountiful giver.
I have heard Elders say they were not dependant upon any
man, I then considerd & do now that it was saying more
than I can say, for I consider that we are all dependant
one upon another for our exhaltation & that our interest
is inseperably connected. (for example) what can my family
do without me supposing they were to all turn away from me
I hold the Keys over them through which they are to receive
there exhaltation. would they would not be like sheep without
a shepherd & would be devoured by the wolves, they certainly
would. then let us change the position, & say that I would
cut off all my family, then what glory would I have with no
body to rule over but my own dear little self. To tell you my feelings
I would rather be annihilated than to be in that situation. This
is another strong proof of the Apostles saying when they declaired
that they without us could not be made perfect. Neither can
you without me nor I without you be made perfect ie if we
are faithful & without faithfulness there is no perfection on any
consideration. This rule applyes to the whole human family.
This is the torment & misery of the disobedient spirits that they
cannot be made perfect, unless some scheme should hereafter
be introduced for their redemption. they are now without tabernacles
to dwell in ownly such as they have taken possession off unlawfully
[page torn] usurped power over. it being a part of their agency that was
[page torn] [bes]towed them which they used to the consumation of there unhappy
[page torn] [w]retched estate, it being the reward & fruits of there doings

Page 24

having been given over to all manner of wickedness perm-
itted to afflict the handy work of the Lord untill they
fill up the cup of their iniquity & the Lord sayeth unto
them thou wicked & disobedient spirit thou shalt not have
power any longer to afflict my people or destroy the
works of my hands, you have forfeited your agency &
wrought thy fulness, depart hence to the pit that I have
prepared for thee, & this is there torment, that thereir power
& agency is taken away. they are left to regret that it was
through their own disobediance that they cut the thread of
there own salvation: the reflections of which ownly serve to
torture & increase there torment & that would be the situation
of my family should they cut themselves off from me. I use
my family for an example, not that I have the least fears
of their ever doing so, for I have none. I feel happy this
night because we are of one mind, still should I believe that we
were perfect & could not advance any further I should not be happy
but to the honor power & glory of the faithful there is no end.
For your satisfaction I will show you a rule by which you may
comprehend the exhaltation of the faithful. I will use myself
as a figure, & say that I am ruling over 10 sons or subjects
[page torn] [o]wnly & soon each one of them would have 10 men sealed
to them & they would be ruler over them & that would
make me ruler over 10 Presidents or Kings whareas I was
[page torn] [r]uler over 10 subjects ownly or in other words I ruled
over one Kingdom but now I rule over 10. then let each
one get 10 more then I would be ruler over 100 Kingdoms
& so on continued to all eternity & the more honor & glory that
I could bestow upon my sons the more it would add to my
exhaltations. but to clip the thread of your exhaltation then
whare would be your your glory: it would be like the fallen
angels or devils that kept not their first esstate but were reserved
in everlasting chains of darkness unto the judgment of the great
day others fell from heaven were thrust down to hell;
but if wyou wish to advance hold up the hands of your file
leader & boast him a head. should you have ten legions of
trains following on after you, you should say to your file
leader push ahead for I am coming with my train boosting
him up at the same time instead of trying to pass by him
this would stimulate him & he would say come on my
boys I will travel as fast as you can & on we would go in
one solid train to all Eternity. Before I close I will answer
one question that has been asked me repetedly. Should I
[page covered] h[av]e a father dead that has never herd this gospel, would
it [page covered] [b]e required of me to redeem him & have him adopted
to some mans family and I be adopted unto my Father
answer No. If we have to attend the ordinances of rede-
[page torn] [m]ption for our dead
relatives we then become their saviors
[page torn] [&] were we to wait to redeem our dead relatives before we
[page torn] c[o]uld link the chain of the Priesthood we would never
[page torn] [a]ccomplish it. Many other remarks were made & while
[page torn] [a]ddressing the females said Sisters if you expect to call me
[page torn] Br Brigham I want you to be cleanly keep your faces, hands
[page torn] [&] skin clean from head to foot your clothes dishes & houses
[page torn] [cl]ean also your children & teach them manners. & when
[page torn] [y]ou mix up Bread dont have a dozen flies in your tray

Page 25

I know that the women generally rule there husbands
& the children their Mothers. But when a woman under-
takes to rule me I want her to be so secret about it that I
cannot catch her at it. Now I do not want the brethren
from my remarks to abuse thereir wives, but treat them
kindly: do there heavy luging but dont wash there dishes
as some men do. At the close of the remarks there was a
little exercise by music & dancing & the meeting was dismised


~ Wednesday


17th The family meeting of President Young met again to
day but Br Young himself spent an exceding sick day
was taken in the night & suffered much. Speaches were
made in the meeting through the day by Br Kimball & others
of the Twelve & in the evening Elder W. Richards addressed
the assembly & was followed by W. Woodruff G. A. Smith &
A. Lyman all of which spoke there minds in plainness
upon a variety of subjects esspecilally the necessit of union
at the close of the addresses there was some music & dancing


~ Thursday


18th I left winter Quarters in company with Br Smoot to go on
a mission to Kegg Creek Br Fowler returned the day before
with my team & I took it to go the journey we rode the first
day to Council Point Br James Alread was president of the
Branch & on our arival we found them assembled for a
meeting we attended with them. After it was opened I addre
ssed the meeting was followed with by Br Smoot & others I r[ead] [page torn]
the revelation & took a vote on it. I spent the night at [page torn]
Br Hydes distance of the day 20


~ Friday


19th I travled to day South of Musketoe Creek & spent the
night with Br Robert Petty distance of the day 15 m


~ Saturday


20th this day witnessed a vary disagreeable & tedious snow
storm I visited the Branch of the Church in the place & organ-
ized it according to the form or pattern Br Petty was
Capt of 100 mostly made up in that place. we then drove
our teem to Cegg Creek through the snow storm & spent
the night at Br A. J. Stewarts our horses suffered in the
storm distance of the day 12


~ Sunday


21 Sunday I met with the Branch on Cegg Creek & addres[sed] [page torn]
them in much plainness & was followed by Elder A. O.
Smoot
& we rebuked & reproved some fals spirits that
was present we organised or took there names for organ-
ization & rode back to Br Pettys & spent the night w [page torn]
had about 2 feet of snow on a level to travel through
1◊ [page torn]


~ Monday


22nd It was a cold morning yet we returned home to
winter Quarters through the snow. 30 mile
I spent the evening in the Council House


~ Tuesday


23 I spent the day in council with the Twelve


~ Wednesday


24th I spent this day writing in my Journal


~ Thursday


25 I spent this day writing & held a council in the
evening with the Presidency of the 1st Division & captain
of the 5th hundred

Page 26

~ Friday


26th I spent the day in aranging the papers of A. O. Smoot
Hundred and in the evening I met in council with
the Twelve whare a number of subjects was spoken
of and we recieved a visit from a man from New orleans
formerly he professed to be an Indian most of persons
believed him to be a descendant of Ham Br Hyde
baptized him in Nauvoo he was an eccentric charact-
er he was the most perfect natural musician I ever
saw on a flute, fife, sauce pan, ratler, whistle &c he was
invited into the council spent a few moments &
returned to Br Youngs. He married Br Stanton's daugh-
ter
for a wife he went to Br Bensons to spend the
night we want to hear him make some music but
he was some disappointed angry & sullen & would not
make any music. His name was Wm Carey


~ Saturday


27th I called upon Br Young & soon the fluiter Br Carey
came in & felt much better than last night & made
the most music on several instruments of any man I
ever herd afterwards I met in council with the
1st division captains of Hundreds & 50s & much business
was done in the evening I met with my company of
there captains & had an excellent meeting. I had the
spirit of the Lord resting upon me & I addressed the
captains upon principle & their duty & had a good
time. I spent a part of the evening with Sister
Sheen & her family I herd much teaching from
Elder Kimball which was interesting


~ Sunday


28th Sunday I met with our ward & held a meeting
with the Saints, I spent the evening with the saints
& writing letters


~ Monday


March 1st 1847 This is my birth day I
am 40 years old this day


[FIGURES] I wrote 5 letters this day
sent by J. M. Grant to New
York
to the following Persons Ezra Carter sen
Ilus F Carter, Freedom Moulton, Sarah B Foss
& Br Enion of Rock Ferry & Joseph A Stratton
of St Louis making & one to Br Cottom of St Joseph
making 7 letters in all. I recieved one letter from
[FIGURE] Br Cottam containing $1. I sold 10 bushels of corn
for 40 cts


~ Tuesday


[page torn] [2]nd I spent the day at home


~ Wednesday to ~ Thursday


[page torn] [3]rd & 4th I spent the most of the time preparing things
[page torn] for my Journey


~ Friday


[page torn] [5]th I met in council with the first division speaches
were made by several of the Brethren concerning our
location here our Journey westward President Young
said he should go as he was directed by the Lord &c
[page torn] [H]e requested the saints to be ready to start on nex the 15


~ Friday to ~ Saturday


[page torn] [5] & 6 was spent in council & labour

Page 27

~ Sunday


7th Sunday I met with the saints in our ward
Bishop Smoot addressed the people concerning the
I followed him and requested the people that had
means to carry sumthing to the Bishop to the poor
to carry flour, meal, meat, coffee shugar &c & I promised
I would do the same we dismissed the meeting &
I called in to hear Br Kimball speak a few moments
I then went home & carried the Bishop 30 lbs flour
half bushel meal 4 lbs shugar 2 lb coffee & others
took him some things. Br Smoot & myself took some
of the things brought in & went to visit the sick we
called upon Br Bundy & Sister Cox both of which
were sick also Job Smith we anointed them with
oil lade hands upon them & prayed for them & left
them some provisions. I then visited Sister Harris
& administered to her with Br Phelps I spent the
night at Br Smoots untill bed time.


~ Monday


8th I met in council with the first division


~ Tuesday


9th I met in council with the Twelve & spent the
day together. while in council Br McCray & Lumero
arived from Nauvoo Bro McCray had been in prision
& many of the brethren were imprisioned & others hung
untill they were nearly dead, this was done by the mob
I spent the evening at Br Smoots & read a portion of
my Journal


~ Wednesday


10th I spent the day at home & met in council with the
Twelve at night


~ Thursday


11th I met in council with the Twelve & assisted Br
Richards to eat a Potatoe pie


~ Friday


12th I spent the day in preparing my carriage to go in
the pioneer company. In the evening I met at the
Council House with the Twelve & others & went forth
in the dance


~ Saturday


13th I spent the day in council with the Twelve
& captains of Hundreds for adopting measures for
the government of the people after we have left


~ Sunday


14th Sunday I met with our ward & spoke to the
people & was followed by Elders Pulsipher, Clapp &
Smoot. I called upon Br G. A. Smith several of
his family was quite sick & in a few moments
after we left, his mother in law sister Bigler died
in the evening I met in council with the Twelve
& High Council President Young preached loud to the
High Council after giving a decision upon the head of
Bishop John Murdock. He prayed that God would let him
live to see the day when the High Council would pass a righte[ous]
decision & have light & understand things


~ Monday


15th Monday night I met in council with the Twelve &
captains of Hundreds the meeting was addressed by
quite a number of elders President Young & others

Page 28

~ Tuesday


16th Tuesday I spent the day at home preparing to start
on my Journey


~ Wednesday


17th I spent the day putting on my carriage top


~ Thursday


18th I was quite unwell I spent the day at home but went
to the Council House in the evening to a musical consort
but was so unwell I had to return home & go to bed


~ Friday


19th I spent the day choreing in the evening I attended a
council of the Twelve & High Council Br Brigham reproved & rebuked in the power of God


~ Saturday


20th I am some better to day are still preparing to go
on the Pioneer Journey. I attended the funeral of
Sister Phebe Traine who died yesterday there is now
much sickness & death in the camp


~ Sunday


21 Sunday the Camp of Israel met in a general meeting on the public
square President Young addressed the meeting & spoke upon a variety of
subjects. He said while speaking upon the spirits that we should prepare
our hearts to recieve the spirit of the Lord & we ought to recieve
any spirit that comes to us into our hearts enough to prove whether it
be good or bad then we should recieve the good & refuse the evil. He
reproved the people sharply for their stealing & other wickedness
for complaining & many things of interest was spoken unto us. I
met in Council with the Twelve at 4 oclok & spent a little
season in speaking upon the celestial law of the Kingdom of God &
our souls were made glad & we rejoiced before the Lord. we also
called into Br Bensons & spent a social hour, we then met with
the High Council but not much business was done. we had a
severe snow storm during the night


~ Monday


22nd It was cold this morning there was a meeting of the
Presidency & Captains of companys & resolved to stockade the
city of winter quarters & for the Twelve to go foreward to pick
out a resting place for the Saints. In the evening I attended a
Council of the Bishops & Twelve remarks were made upon a
variety of subjects Brother B. Young spoke upon the subject
of Patriarchal blessings & the blessing of children said that any
father who held the Priesthood was a Patriarch to his own family
& when he blessed his children it was a patriarchal blessing
If a man wrote the blessing of his children & could get the
Historian to write it it was well enough but the Historian
could not write all the children blessings in the Church


~ Tuesday


^[FIGURE]^ 23rd The Presidency & Bishops met to decide whare the lines
of the City should be I spent the day at work & writing
I recieved a letter from Br Ilus Carter


~ Wednesday


24th I spent the day at home


~ Thursday


25 I spent the day at work


~ Friday


26th The Camp of Israel held a public meeting to day & I
attended with the quorum of the Twelve much instruction
[page covered] [&] teaching was given. In the evening I met with my company
[page covered] [&] expressed my feelings to them concerning labouring together
[page covered] [f]or the season in raising grain & taking care of the families of
those who went in the Pioner company the spirit of union
prevailed among them. After this I met with the quorum of the
Twelve and Wm McCary the coolurd man met with them
showed his dody [body] to the company to see if he dhad not a rib gone &c

Page 29

~ Saturday


267th I attended the funeral of sister Burnham & took the
family to the grave after the return Br G. A. Smith had
my team to go to the grave to bury one of his family
during the evening I took a ride out with my family &
friends around the city & down the river Bank I wet
my feet & returned home


~ Sunday


28th Sunday a fine day the Camp met at the public stand
& was addressed in the morning by Brs Young, Kimball
Pratt, & Benson. in the afternoon we partook of the sacram[en]t
& was addressed by Brs, Woodruff, Smith, Lyman, Richards
Phelps & B. Young, the first time the sacrament had been
administered to the Saints in a general assembly in winter
quarters
. we had a good time of it. In the evening I
visited the sick and administered to 5 persons among
whom was Br McCaslin & Sister Porter both vary sick. I
attended the council in the evening with the High Council
& twelve & Bishops, I then returned home & spent the night


~ Monday


29th I met this morning with the Presidency, captains
of Hundreds & Pioneer company to prepare for starting
it was finally agreeed that all that were ready start for
the horn to morrow morning. it is fine good weather I maid
a dbed this morning for sowing salit. two mules were hitched
to a Blacksmith shop & puled it down the timbers fell upon
several at work in the shop. A large stick fell upon the
head of Br Little John Utley & was a wonder that it had
not broke his head & neck both, it injured him severely
He was carried into the house several of us laid hands upon
him & I prayed with him.


~ Tuesday


30th I spent the day at home & I was in council in the evening


~ Wednesday


31st I spent the day writing I met in the evening in council
with the Presidency & Captains of Hundreds expressed my
feelings with many others upon the subject of blockading this
city & uniting together in there labour in cultivating the earth
President Young also made some remarks upon the same subjet
at the close of this council the quorum of the Twelve met
in Council & resolved that Br W. W. Phelps go to the east &
procure a printing Press & type & recieved recommendations
to that effect


~ Thursday


Aprail 1st [FIGURE] I set for a portrait to be taken by Major to be put in
a work with others of the Twelve. In the afternoon I met in
council with the Twelve Elder J. A. Stratton was present had
just arived from St Louis gave an account of his procedings
there which was satisfactory we herd all the names read in the
St Louis Branch. We recieved a mail of papers containing the war
News &c. which we read with interest we had a council in the evening


~ Friday


2nd A portion of the pioneers commenced removing the out house
into a line in the City I spent a part of the day at the office reading
the News & a part of the day in Journal writing. I also wrote
an Epistle to my family & the captains of my company giving
an account of my affairs which I leave behind

Page 30

~ Saturday


3rd It was a busy day with me preparing to start on the journey
we are now about to start on the pioneer Journey
to go to the mountains of Israel to find a location as
a resting place for the saints while the Judgments
of God are poured out upon the earth & the burthen
& cares of the churches & my family rest with great
wait upon my mind. I have never felt more wait
upon my mind at any time while leaving my family
to go on a mission than now. My prayer to God is
that He will sustain myself & family to meet again
on the earth as he hath done in the many mishoions I
have taken on the earth in the vineyard of the Lord
I assisted Br Richards in the evening to pack up his
waggon


~ Sunday


4th Sunday I went to the river in the morning &
baptized 3 persons ofmembers of Br Deweys family
I also confirmed them. I did not attend
meeting in the morning but attended in the after
noon Br Young addressed the meeting also Lorenzo
Young
& A Lymy good instructions were given
I spent the evening picking up things for starting


~ Monday


5th A hard rainy morning we were intending to start
this morning but shall not in consequence of the rain


~ Tuesday


6th April 1847 we met in Public Conference this morning
in winter quarters not much business was done the sun
shone bright, the Heavens smiled upon us our hearts were
made glad President Young spoke to the peo[p]le good doctr
-in, the conference voted to sustain the quorum of the
Twelve in their place, the Presidents of the Seventies of, the
Seventies Bishops &c. I spent the afternoon in preparing to
start as I expect it will be the last day I shall spend at home
for the presient


~ Wednesday


7th, I took my leave of my family & friends & started
with my company of Pioneer waggons & in all & left
winter quarters for the Journey when we were
on the top of the ridge west of the City I took a
view of the place & looked at my wife & children
through my glass I then led the company to the
old camp ground from thence on the Punkaw
road about 7 miles & camped for the night about
10 miles from Winter quarters we had excellent
stables for our horses in a valley near a small stream of
water we had not been camped long before Br
Pratt & his company arived & vary soon President
Young & his company so we all camped together about
25 waggons. It was a vary windy night 10 m


~ Thursday


8th In the morning we arose & took breakfast. A squirrel
was killed it being the first game killed in the camp of the
Pioneers I moved that as it was the first fruits of the
game that it be offered to the Priest. It was presented
to President Young for his breakfast. President Young
in company with Father Morley & others went to the old [campground]

Page 31

to pick them out a place for a farm. I with several
others spent the day hunting & caught nothing but
weary limbs & weat feet. we saw 7 or 8 deer. & geese
ducks cranes &c but could not get any. As I returned
in the evening I understood tha P. P. Pratt had arived in
winter quarters from his mission in England & tha President
Young O. Pratt & others had gone back to the City to see
him. distance of the day 12 m


~ Friday


9th I monted my horse in the morning & started back
to winter quarters to see Br Parley the Twelve my
family &c. Mrs Woodruff was at our camp yesterday while
I was out hunting & left a letter for me In answer to
one I wrote her the day before. Before I got to the
city I met the Twelve I was within half a mile of home
yet I turned about with them & came on to the camp
harnessed up our horses & drove untill dark towards
the horn. & camped for the night distance 10 m
Br Young & Kimball camped several miles behind us


~ Saturday


10th We started early in the morning & drove to the
horn & crossed it with all our teams on a raft before sun
set. it is about 12 rods across the stream whare we rafted
it is in sight of the Plat. distance of the day 25 miles


~ Sunday


11th Sunday we crossed over about 20 waggons in the
morning & then President Young & Kimball arived with
there companies & we continued to cross them untill
they were over There was one brother quite sick in
the night Br Benson & myself lade hands upon him &
prayed with him & he recoverd, we moved down our
encampment 2 miles & spent the night


~ Monday


12th The encampment moved up the platt 14 miles. the quorum
of the Twelve & others crossed the Horn & returned to the
City of Winter quarters on the Missouri River 4 of us
followed an Indian trail & cut off about 15 miles it
was about 20 miles the way we went & 35 in the way the
waggons went. I again met with my family & spent the
night the distance of the day 20 miles
I attended a meeting in the evening with my company
the Twelve held a council but I was not present


~ Tuesday


13th I was vary busy this day I painted one waggon to take
away to sell. I got another horse to take with me
on the journey. I was in council with the quorum of
the Twelve untill midnight Elder John Taylor was
with us he arived in the city in the evening on his
returned from England we were all glad to meet
with him once more. He brought the following instru-
ments foor our use on this pioneer Journey two sextons
two Byrometers, two artificial Horison, one circle of
Reflection one telescope [blank] all of which
were exhibited to us in the evening & boxed up so that we
could take them along. I spent the remainder of the night
at home the last night I shall spend at winter quarters for
a long time

Page 32

~ Wednesday


14th After getting all things in readiness to leave I called
my family together & blessed my wife & childrens
and left them in the hands of the Lord. I bid farew
ell to father Woodruff & family and all around me
& took my leave of winter quarters & in company
with Elders O Pratt, Lyman G. A. Smith E. Snow & others
we again took the indian trail & rode through the
prairie to the Elk Horn & went over on a raft & camped
two miles below the ferry. & we had a splendid
supper composed of fried, cat fish, pork, beans, short
cake
, honey comb, coffee, milk &c &c we all eat vary
harty, had prayers & retired to bed 25 miles


~ Thursday


15th
Professor Pratt took an observation this morning
for the correct time. we had a good breakfast
soon Br's Young, Kimball. Benson, Whitney & many
others came & crossed the ferry & we all moved up
to the general camp on the Platt River 9 miles
we found the camp vary busy in blacksmith work &
getting ready to continue the Journey. we spent the
night at this place. during the evening Br Little arived from
the eastern states in our midst. When he arived at winter
quarters
findeding we he had left he followed us post haste
& leaving all things behingd him he over took us this
evening. He gave us news of the eastern churches spoke
of many friends among wholm was our friend col
Kane who had remembered the qQuorum of the Twelve
& others by forwarding a variety of Presents to us. He for-
warded to us me a Patent Life Preserver & Stop compass
Br Little spent the night in camp


~ Friday


16th Brother Little, P. Rockwell & J. Reading returned
to winter quarters the camp continued up the Platt
4 miles & camped & turned their horses upon
an Island of cottonwood & rushesh. the wind
blew exceding hard during the night. Before we left
this morning the camp came together, and was
organized for Journeying as a military body into tens
50 & 100s. Col Markham & A. P Rockwood was appoin-
ted Captains over A Hundred & 4 Captains of fifties
& Captains of tens. I was appointed Capt of ten
the following are the names of the persons belonging
to my ten W. Woodruff J. S Fowler J. Burnham,
O. Pratt, Joseph Egbert, John M. Freeman. Marcus B
Thorp
, G. A. Smith, George Wardle. Being 9 in all
the camp consisted of 73 waggons & 143 men
3 women & 2 children making 148 souls in all


~ Saturday


17th We travled 8 miles & camped in the edge of a grove
of cottonwoods to spend the sabbath in the afternoon
the organization of the camp was finished in the follow
ing order B Young Lieutenant General. Stephen
Markham
Colonel. John Pack 1st Major. Shedrich
Rounday
2nd Major

Page 33

The rigment be divided into tens under the folloing
Captains
Wilford Woodruff Capt of 1st company
Ezra T. Benson 2nd "
Phineas H Young 3rd "
Luke Johnson 4th "
Stephen H Godard 5th "
Charles Shumway 6 "
James Case 7 "
Seth Taph 8 "
Howard Egan 9 "
Appleton Harmon 10 "
John Higby 11 "
Norton Jacobs 12 "
John Brown 13 "
Joseph Matthews 14th "


Orders from Gen Young was for the whole
regment to Journey in a copacked body as we
were in an indian country for evry man to carry
his gun loaded for the cap locks to be shut onto a
peace of buck skin with cap handy to slip on in
an instant in case of an attacked. for flint locks
with cotton or tow in the pan, & a powder flask handy
to prime quick, the object of this caution is to prevent
accident. and for every man to walk beside his
waggon & not leave it except he is sent away.
strict rules & disipline are necessary while travling
through a hostile indian country, some traiders
came down from the Pawnees & camped with us
over night, they had a plenty of boffaloo meet
dried & gave us what we wished. they informed
us we were within two days drive of the whole dody [body]
of the pawnees, we camped here in a line for the
sabbath


~ Sunday


[FIGURE] 18th Sunday I wrote a letter home to Mrs
Woodruff by Br Eames who wished to return back
I perused several papers to day. but did not find
much news. Br O Pratt took an observation of his Barom-
eter. President Young called the captains together &
gave them instruction to travel in the morning two
abrest & let all who were not driving teams carry
their guns & walk by the side of the waggons let
no man go away hunting to get of sight of the camp
The bugle was to be blown at half past 8 oclok at
night when all was to go to prayers in their several
waggons & retire to bed by 9 oclok. The bugle
will blow at 5 oclok in the morning to arise & pray
& two hours will be allotted the camp to dress pray
cook eat feed horses harness &c & start at the blowing
of the bugle at 7 oclok this is the order of
the camp Travellers have freequently spoken
of the Platt River in relation to it I will

Page 34

It is the most singular river I ever beheld. it is from
a quarter to half a mile wide & its shores & bed one universall
body of quick sand it is a rapid stream yet many places
a person can wade across it frequently nearly the whole
bed of the river is covered with but few inches of water
& at other places it is deep & rapid not withstanding
it is quick sand horses & cattle can walk down to edge
of the river & drink like walking on the edge of a smooth
sea beach & some times while walking on the apparent
hard beach or bed of the river a man or horse will sudd-
enly sink into the quick sand & the more he struggles
to get out the more he will sink & will soon perish of
assistance is not near, whare many horses & men have
been lost in this way on the Platt. whare we have
spent the Sabbath a man could nearly wade across
the river. we do not travel on Sunday but pitch
our tents Saturday night or encamp in the waggons
& we do not move untill monday morning this is the
order of the camp


~ Monday


19th It was quite cool in the morning. the bugle blew
at 5 for prayers & 7 for starting we travled two
abrest men walked by the side of their wagons, we
bore a notherly direction untill about noon when we reac
hed the north bend of the Platt. Prosfessor Pratt look an
observation & found it to be in, Lat. 41 27 5 the crossing
place of the Horn was in Lat. 41 16 24 making the
North Bend of the Platt 10 1/2 miles north of the ford
we formed into a circle at noon & bated while nooning
Elder Little arived with P Rockwell & two others they brought
the mail I recieved two Letters one from L Hardy of Mass who
informed me that Milton Holmes father & Mother was cut off
from the ^Church^ & he with them turned Strangites and that Aphia
his wife was a great apostate O, Milton Holmes how hast thou
fallen. the other letter was from Mrs Woodruff, which I read
with interest. Br Little brought many things that the Colonel
Kane sent as presents to the 12 & others I recieved a. stop box
Marriners compass small enough to carry in the pocket it
was a splendid present. May the blessings of God be
upon the head of Col Cane for his good feelings towards
the servants of God. during thi we camped at night
near a grove of timber on the bank of the Platt
we formed a circle from edge to edge of the bank
of the river the river on one side was our defence
we drove the tongues of our waggons out ward &
fore wheel of each waggon was placed against the
hind wheel of the waggon before it and all the
horses & cattle taken inside the circle so that we were
secure against the Indians. the river was about one
mile wide whare we camped & on the north side joinin-
g our encampment it was deep & rapid, the face of
the country during to days travel was on the south
side of the river high bluffs runing precpeitately to the
river on the north side which we travled a level prairie
without any bluffs about 2 miles from the river a rise
of table land about 10 feet & continues of a level
no timber except patches on the river soil sandy 22 mi

Page 35

~Tuesday


20th A hard wind through the night. this morning fair
but strong SW wind it covers our waggons with sand
& dust while journeying the soil is universally
sandy on the banks of the Platt the grass is now
about 4 inch high scattering not half feed. their are
many waterfowls about the Platt such as ducks geese
brant but the most numerous of all are the sand Hill Cranes which
flye in large flocks on evry side of us. 25 minutes past 7 we
started on our Journey, 2 1/2 miles came to another grove of small
& large cottonwoods covering about 40 acres, it was about
5 miles to the table land which was now rising into a bluff. Here
the road runs 20 degrees south of west bending to S by W, one mile
in which distance we passed 3 Islands in the Platt covered with
timber the largest about 10 acres & their continues a chain of
Islands for miles on the river & some timber on the south
side of the Platt. we came to shell creek 3 miles from our
encampment 1 1/2 miles to the right of shell creek is a prairie
dog village covering about 6 acres of ground. this Creek is timbered
ownly by a few scattering willows the river runs about
parallel with the river its general barings are abouc east &
west after crossing the shell creek bridge the road runs
about S.W by W 60 degres west of south for about 15 miles
the Platt is skirted with timber. Professer Pratt & myself
went forward of the company to take observation we traveled
about 13 miles & stoped bated horses took observations &c
while on the road we freequently see gopher hills from
one to 6 feet in circumference diamiter & from 3 inch to
2 feet in highth some resembling a potatoe patch which
makes it rough waggoning over them with the exception
of this it is the best road on the north side of the Platt
river I ever travled being a level dry hard road. our
standard Thermometer stood to day at 1 oclok 94°, / the
company approached us & we continued on 5 mile & the
whole encampment came up & we encamped for the night
in a circle, cut down cotton wood trees to feeds the
horses on the bark they will knaw off the bark from
brouse limbs & sticks 10 inches through as readily as they
would eat corn we have had to feed upon cotton wood
all the way thus far we give each horse also about 2 quarts
of corn per day. Our fisherman drew a net this afternoon
& broat into camp 213 fish Buffalo & Carp which was
divided in the Camp we had a Buffalo would weigh 10 lbs
a Carp 2 lbs & had a good supper. The Platt was a mile
wide whare we camped including an Island opposite of
us with timber the distance of the day 18 miles


~ Wednesday


21st Cloudy with a light sprinkle of rain wind
in the east our road runs west to begin with
the ox teams started at 7 oclok the horse teams
at 8, 15 minutes to 9 an Indian appeared on a
mound mounted on a poney about 5 miles fro
us he went out of sight & again appeared
He then approached the camp full speed was
met by the brethren & shook hands was son
followed by others were 8 in all they went

Page 36

through the encampment & then returned
with us the road runs 20 degrees south of
west 7 miles then turned 10 dgress North
of west at half past 12 we came in sight of
70 Indian Horses & Mules soon we came in
sight of a large Pawnee Indian village on the
north side of the lou fork & also a large one on
the south side of it. we drove on by the villages
& they soon began to sally out to come to us. we
camped in a half moon the bank of the river
forming a parallel line in front the indians to the
number of about 200 on the south side of
the river came down to the shore some waided
over about 75 came into camp including the
grand Chief of the Nation with many war chiefs
we met them before we left the ground & made
them presents of about 4 lbs of tobacco 15 lbs lead
powder fish hooks beads flour salt &c but still
they were not satisfied considering our num
bers they thought they ought to have had
more & when we left the ground they appeared vary
dissatisfied we however harnessed up our teams & drove on
to looking glass creek & camped at its mouth for the night
upon the bank of the loop fork after our horses were turned
out we were called together & in consequence of the dissat
isfaction of the Indians a guard of 100 men was called
for the quorum of the Twelve with nearly the whole
camp volunteered to stand guard one half the fore part
of the night & the other the latter part we had a picket
guard also of 5 men & mules at a time I with my mule
was on picket guard. we had hard wind & rain in the
afternoon which continued a part of the time while I
was on guard I rolled myself up in my buffalo & let the wind
& rain beat onto me we were releaved at about 1 oclok
& went to rest. But no Indians appeared during the
night


~ Thursday


22 we crossed the looking glass 15 minutes to 9, & then
continued a westerly course there were a good many auter
on the looking glass. we arived at Beaver Creek at 12 oclok there
are some Beaver on this creek ^about one mile above its mouth^ Professor Pratt took the meridian
observation of the sun by the sextant for the Lat which was
found to be 41° 25' 15". Also found the magnetic needle
to vary about 12 degrees east. And found the barometer at half
past 12, 28. 711, the attached Thermometer standing
at 68° and the detached thermometer at 67° & also took an obser
vation of the sun for the ^true^ time in the morning it is 10 miles
between the two creeks which we travled this forenoon. we
crossed Beaver creek at half past 2 oclok, the road runs about
south west. the water was about to the deds [beds] of our wagg-
ons it was a rough steep bank to come out of about 12
men hitched a hook & roap to the tongue of each waggon
& puled them up; Beaver Creek is lined with scattering
timber cottonwood & willows, we travled 7 miles &
came to the Pawnee Mishionary station & camped for
the night the road was Bluff was skirted with some

Page 37

Oaks on the North side of the road in the hills, we kept
out a gard through the night as we were in danger
of the Sioux on one side, and the Pawnees on the other
President Young addressed the Camp. & told them
when they left in the morning not to take away any
thing ownly what they brought with them unless it was
sold them by Brother Case who had had charge of the
Station for a long time & the goverment was owing
him a good deal & if he felt disposed to sell any thing
that he had in his possession & report to Goverment
he could do so. during the evening Professer Pratt
took made some observation at 15 m pas 7 oclok the
barometer stood at 28.7 inches attached Thermometer
64° detached Thermometer 60° North wind & fair
the same Also at 8 oclok 52 m found the double altitude
of the pole star to be 80° 20' 35" from which the
lattitude was deduced viz. O, Pratt. Also took the angular
distance of sun & moon for the Longitude at Beaver Creek ford also
the altitude of the moon for the tru time


~ Friday


23rd At 6 oclok O Pratt made a barometrical observation
mercury standing at 28.697 inch attached Thermometer
36° detached thermometer 34° vary little wind from
west fair. Also took an altitude of the sun for the time, and
also A Meridan Altitude of the sun for the latitude found it
to be 41° 24' 29". While wattering the horses
at a creek at the station last evening Brother G. A. Smiths horse
mired & pitched foreward & Jumped onto him trod upon his
feet & breast & held him fast in the mud untill I caught
him by the bit & backed him off I was fearful he was badly
injured but at last found that he was but little hurt


[FIGURE] This was a day of adventures to the pioner camp in
the morning 12 of us started on horsback to search
out a ford across the dangerous difficult & troublesom loup
fork
of the Patt river we went down the stream some
distance & several men waided across the stream & found
the water so deep & so much quick sand we concluded
to drive Hier up to the old Pawnee village so we returned
to the camp harnessed up our horses, my gray horse named
Titus had the belly ake or bots yet I started out with him
& the camp drove up with some little difficulty to the
old Indian village or a little below it & men commenced
searching out a ford & found the whole bed of the river
one universal dody [body] of quick sand which if a horse or
waggon stoped it would begin to sink down we
had two channels of water to cross with a sand bar in
in the middle the deepest water was from 3 to 4 feet deedp &
vary rapid & about 300 ^yards^ strait across some places of quick
sand was found so soft as to sink man or beast instantly in
& the more he strugled to get out the more he would sink
but we calculated to avoid such places as much as possible
As I was forward with my 10 or the first ten it fell to me to
make the trial professor Pratt having a strong pair of horses
went forward and I followed him I had two yoke of
cattle & my horses on my carriage with about 10 hundred

Page 38

on I immediately saw as soon as I started that the cattle did
but little good were slow & in the way we would stop & bgin
to sink I Jumped out of my carriage into the water up
to my waist about 10 men came to my assistance with a
drag roap & hitched to the oxen & assisted me in getting
across the first stream but with great difficulty I
stoped on a sand bar out of water my horses & waggon im-
mediately began to sink & by treading the ground a little it
would become a perfect quagmire. but though we were
sinking in it the men had to leave the waggon whare it
was for O Pratt in trying to cross the second stream had
sunk into a bed of quick sand and all men had to go to his
relief to get his horses & waggon out the horses were taken
from the waggons the load taken out & carried to shore by
hand & the waggon drawn out by by the help of men
I took off a part of my load or most of it in a boat
& went through the second stream empty & got out two
other waggons done in the same way but it was so terri-
fic the rest of the camp would not follow suit. so their
were 6 men of us in all to spend the night to gether without
horses & waggons to guard against the whole Pawnee band that
were camped below us on the same side of the river should they
feel disposed to come upon us, there numbers were not known
but it was supposed they numbered over 600 warriors, we
divided our company which made ownly three of us on guard
at a time Br Pack O. Pratt & myself went on guard the
fore part of the night although I had been in the water
during the afternoon I stood guard in my wet clothing one
half the night & slept in them the other half, we had not more
than got our position for the night untill we were joined by
5 men who crossed the river in a boat were sent over by
President Young to assist us which made eleven men
instead of 6 so we divided our force accordingly. the
night past off in peace & no disturbance. distance from the
Missionary station to the ford 4 miles 4 miles


~ Saturday


24th A plesant morning Professor Pratt took an observation
on the south bank of the fording place on the loup fork
4 miles from the Missionary station, took a meridian
observation of the sun for the Lattitude found to be
to cross the ^41° 22' 37".^ The camp now wer busiy in concocking plans
to cross the river the[y] drew together timber & rails to build
two rafts & began to put it together but some of the Breth-
ren made another trial to cross with waggons by putting
on several hors & mule teame they went a little hier up
than we did & got over with much less difficulty & the
more the ground was trod in the water the smother & harder
it grew, so the whole encampment turned there waggons
back to the ford & abandoned the raft & by unloading one
half of there baggage could cross in safety & the whole
encampment came over in that way by doubling teams
& going back & forth untill all were over each captain
with his ten assisted each other over, & so in this
way all Israel who were present went over (not Jordan)
but the Loup fork of the Platt river in safety without
damage to man or beast & we felt thankful in our hearts

Page 39

to our God for his mercies unto us & that we were on
the south side of the river. we all loaded up our waggons
& drove 4 miles & camped for the Sabbath on the
bank of the stream After our waggons were placed
the Twelve & took a walk on the high table land to
make observations with our glasses of the sourrounding
country. Professor Pratt made a barometrical observation
at this place at 15 m past 7. Barometer stood at 28.56 inch
attached Thermometer 564° detached Thermometer 61°.5


~ Sunday


25th Sunday a plesant morning. The order of the camp
is that there be no fishing, hunting or labour of any kind
on Sunday except such as is actually necessary. 4 antelope
appeared before us on the plain on the opposide side of
the river we could see them with the naked eye
but far more clearly through our spy glasses, there
sides & belly were white & backs brown these were the
first antelope I ever saw. about 10 oclok also 4 Elk appeared
on the opposite side of the river which we looked at with our
glasses these were the first Elk also I ever saw. the day was
mostly spent in resting man & beast untill 4 oclok, the camp
gathered together for a meeting & were addressed by a number of
the Brethren among whome was G. A. Smith & B. Young
who spoke upon principle upon breaking off the yoke from
the saints some pretended to say that the Twelve were
oppressing the People but is it so no, but if most men that
are on the earth those in the Church not excepted should
rule & lead this Church they would have many yokes
put upon them that we are all the while trying to take
off their shouldiers. many other good things were said
the guards were placed out as usual to guard the camp
during the evening a company of hunters were appointed to go
foreward of the camp to ketch game there were 7 hors-
eman & 10 footman the quorum of the Twelve also had the
privilege of Joining the hunters when they please. ^A^ Meriardian
Alt of the sun gave for the Lat 41° 20' 31".


~ Monday


26th Early in the morning before the break of day 2 Indians
crept upon their hands & knees approaching the camp to
steal some horses they got within 3 rods of the guard before
they were discovered. they first thought them to be wolves
& snaped ^at^ them they rose up & run & two of the guard fired
at them & 4 others rose up out of the grass making 6 in
all the bugle was sounded and all arose up to arms not know-
ing but there was a large party nearby but we saw
no more. I started out in the morning with the hunters
we saw 8 deer 4 antelope but caught nothing we
travled 8 miles & camped for noon, on the opposite
side of the river we saw through our glasses the
relicks of an old Indian town. we saw 8 trails
leading to it with 6 & 8 abrest each in the afternoon
we travled we travled 7 miles & camped on clear
creek
with a hard gravel bottom the first one
of the kind we had met with on the road. we
killed one wild goose & saw fresh buffalo signs

Page 40

whare we camped this was the first signs of the kind
we had seen on the road. the travels to day was like
a level desert except except the dividing ridge betwen
the two rivers the grass was dry & sandy mostly level
& nearly without water we travled to day from 10 to 20 degrees
west of south we camped under a high bluff in a half moon Brs
Young, Kimball, Richard's, & myself went on to a high bluff to view
the country yust [just] at dusk a tremendious alarm was given thro-
ugh the camp that Indians had cralled up & taken Porter
Rockwell
& his horse & made off with him many men mou-
nted there horses & made off with ^after^ him with all speed but
it was soon discovered that Rockwell was in the camp but
two horses were gone Dr Richards & Br Littles & about 20
men mounted & armed went in search of the horses but found
them not it was believed the Indians took off the horses 15 miles
distance of the day. Lat of this place is 41° 17' 21"
Barometer 28.445 inch attached Ther 85° detached Ther 87° S.S.W. wind fair


~ Tuesday


27th O. P. Rockwell & 3 others went again in search of the lost
horses & were gone all day we continued our Journey
a south course to try to get on the platt river, we
came on to some beautiful green grass & saw a great
quantity of buffaloo sign but found no wood or water
travled 12 miles & bated our horses in a green valley
Just as we were starting in the afternoon we rose
a small bluff & saw two antelope before us in the valley
Brs Young Kimball & myself were together Br Brown & another
Brother was on another side of the hill & saw him also Br
Brown first fired upon him another man & myself fired
also we all hit him with our balls but he did not fall
we rode up to him & cut his Throat to bleed him
& he run about 10 rods & fell this was the first antilope
we have killed he was dressed & put on board of the
waggons & we continued on in a short time we
saw 3 more at the top of a mound looking at us Br
Brown & myself went after them but they went onto
the flats & we could not get to them so we left them
turned about 10 degreeds east of South went to a Creek
& camped our cattle & horses were vary dry not finding
any water through the day, we had a heavy storm of
Thunder lightning wind & some little rain which lasted
about an hour. A rifle went off in Br Brown waggon
by accident the ball went through a bag of cloths
(set it on fire) through the waggon) & broke a leg of
a fine horse which broke up one team. in the edge of the
evening O. P. Rockwell & the Brethren with him returned
& reported that the Indians had stolen the two
horses & they were attacked by 15 Indians who were
in ambush in the grass they came upon them determined
to take their horses from them they kept them off
by their rifles & Pistles the Indians were armed
with guns & Bows & when they found they could not
skare the Brethren they then professed friendship to get
to them but the Brethren were resolute & determined
not to move but to fight first though ownly 4 to 15 men
the Indians finally rushed upon them to ketch the
horses by the bit & the Brethren drew their pistols upon

Page 41

[page torn] [t]hem determined to fire & do their best & the Indians
seeing their determination broke & run but fired their
guns upon the Brethren & the balls whisled around them
but no one injured they did not fire upon the Indians
not wishing to kill them if they could help it. distance of the day 20 m
16 miles s w of from our last station, about half way between the
loup fork & Platt rivers, the meridian alt. of the sun gave for
the Lat 41° 9' 26". 0h 30m Bar stood at 28.053
Attached Ther 87° detached Ther 88° S.S.W. wind fair


~ Wednesday


28th at 6 1/2 At 6 1/2 A.M. Bar. stood at 27.968– Attached Ther.
59°.5 detached Ther. 60° wind N.N.E. fair a plesant
morning 160 miles from the Patt River on Plain kreek we travled
to grand Island & camped on its banks for nooning I went
out with the hunters caught nothing but one wolf & a goose
in the afternoon we travled 6 miles & camped on wood
creek
formed a circle put our horses inside & had good defense
we saw many deer in the afternoon run across on the Island
President Young thought it not prudent to travel up the
Island hunting lest we get into an Indian ambush 15 m


~ Thursday


29th A cool morning the camp started at 5 oclok without
feeding, drove 3 miles stoped & bated & breakfasted the hunters
went up the Island. Grand Island is well supplyed
with rushes & cotton wood; wood creek is heavily wooded
for this country we are begining to get a good bide of
grass for our horses & cattle Professor Pratt at 7h 30m AM
took a Bar. observation on wood creek at our camping place
Mercury in the Bar. standing at 27 inch 27.979 inch
Attached Ther. 61°.5 detached Ther. 60°.2. S. wind fair.
We travled 8 miles & nooned. Travled in the afternoon
10 miles & camped on the borders of grand Island, the
Island at this place was thickly coverd with rushes upon
which we fed our horses I went out with the hunters
we saw about 30 antelope & 8 deer the antelope
would play around on the large plains & keep out of our
way so we should not shoot them they mostly went
towards wood creek which we had forded in the morn[i]ng
& left to our right the ford was good. we shot 4 geese
I shot two of them & one deer but did not get the deer
we find places on the main land bordering upon grand
Island coverd with white substance resembling salt
& taste quite saltish. we camped for the night
distance of the day 20 m


~ Friday


30th O Pratt took observations on the north bank of
the Platt river 17 miles from the last station
at 6 1/2 A.M. of the barrometer mercury stood at
27.716 Attached Ther. 50° detached Ther. 48°
S.E. wind fair. At noon Lat 40° 42' 37". At 6 1/2 PM
17 miles west of morning station Bar. 27.933 Inch
Alt. Ther 43°.5 deta[ched] Ther. 41°.5 North wind fair
we travled to day 16 miles & camped without wood
or water the wind blew hard in the evening. the
Ther stood at 41°. the grass was short affording but
little feed 16

Page 42

~ Saturday


May 1st 1847 [FIGURE] This was an interesting day
to the hunters of the Camp of
Israel
. It was vary cold Ther stood
at 30° with strong North wind
the hunters put out & the camp
started on the Journey. Before breakfast travled 6 miles
& camped on the Prairie in sight of a herd of buffalo of
200 feeding on the bluff to our right. three ownly of the
hunters started out after them they rode near them &
left their horses & cralled upon them to get a shot but they
frightend the herd & they run away. A little previous to the
main herds being seen 3 bulls were discoverd on the
bluff O. P. Rockwell & two others went after them &
wounded two but got neither of them we had not
travled more than 2 miles before we discoverd another
large herd of about 200, 5 miles ahead of us the hunters
got together held a council & waited untill the camp all
came up we were determined to get some of the buffalo
if possible we travled together untill we were within one mile
of the buffalo we then made a halt, & 15 hunters started out
Amasa Lyman & myself of the Twelve made two of the numb
ber we all travled together on to the bluffs within a few rods
of them & there divided out into companies Br Grover &
Luke Johnson went together into the bluffs O. P. Rockwell
& Br Brown took the entire left & so we divided into compa-
nies on the right left & center I was in a company in the
centre of the herd & we all made a charge upon them from
the bluffs & rushed on to the Plain, the herd run vary fast
down the ruff bluffs into the plain but when we came up to
the plain we soon came on to them each company singled
out his game we made choice of Cows generally then rushed
up by the side of them & fired upon them with our Pistols
such as horse Pistols Rifle Pistols &c which are much better
to carry than rifles as they are vary cumberson in runing the first
that we gave chase to was a Buffaloo Cow with her calf I
rode by the side of her & fired two balls from my Pistols
into her. the other Brethren with me also fired into her
untill we killed we cut her throat I then run my
horse to the assistance of another Party who had wounded
one & that one was also soon dispatched. I then saw
O. P. Rockwell. had 3 bulls at bay on the Prairie Br Pack &
myself run our horses to his assistance & Br Kimball came up at
the same time we surrounded them & commenced firing
upon them they bolted ahead I put spirs to my horse
& run in ahead of them was in about one rod of them
they all Pitched at ^me^ & gave me chase for fight & I had to
be quick to get out of their way but soon cleared them
two of them broke for the bluff Br Brown put for them
Rockwell, Kimball, Pack & myself stuck to the old bull I
fired 2 balls into him, Br Kimball one, Br Pack one & he fell
dead, & we cut his throat, & also shot a clalf that was
with him, the two that had left us that Brown was
after was in the bluffs more than a mile from us Br
Kimball & myself gave chase to them & as we got in
about 20 rods of the bluff we saw two come out &
run for the main herd we gave chase for a while
but they were fresh & my horse had run near 10 miles

Page 43

in the chase so we gave up the persuit I returned to Br Brown
in the bluffs & found that one of the bulls he had given chase to
was near dead had lain dead down but Br Brown had no more
Powder or Ball but before I arived he had got up & run
into the herd on the bluff, so we all returned on our chase
ground to gather up the meat, we had killed in all 3 cows one
bull & 5 calves making 11 in all. Br Solomon Hancock went
out in the morning on to the bluffs to kill buffalo on foot
He did not come in at night we felt concerned about him
early in the morning he came in, had killed a 3 year old cow
& watched it over night to keep the volves from eating it
3 wolves came upon him he shot one the rest run
away this made 12 buffalo in all that the hunters
killed to day which we considered was doing vary well
considering that we were nearly all strangers to that mode
of hunting as but vary few of us ever saw a wild
buffalo before in our lives we dressed out meat & waggons
came from camp to take it in. A part of this chase was
through one of the largest Prairie dog towns nearly ever
seen it was nearly ten miles long & 2 wide & full of
burrows nearly evry rod & great danger of a horse steping
into them & falling, there was no accident happened
at all to any one which was truly a blessing my horse stumbled
on[c]e & come nigh falling but no harm done this was
the first buffalo hunt I ever took part in or saw
we travled to day with the camp 18 miles
we discovered Indian fires on the south & west of us


~ Sunday


2nd Suunday All were busy cooking & saving there meat
in the afternoon we moved up 3 miles for better feed &
camped by the side of a large slew of water our camping
place last night & this morning was at the head of Grand Island
Professor Pratt took an observation for the Lattitude & found
it to be 40° 41' 42" this agrees with Freemonts obervation
within 2 miles & his was on the south side of the river which
was 2 miles south of our camping place we came through another
large dog town to day, soon after we camped a herd of
buffalo came from the bluffs to the river to drink
within about 2 miles of us & then returned to the bluffs
some were anxious to go after them, but as it was
Sunday Br Young thought it best to let them be
untill tomorrow the Indians set fire to the Prairie
before us which burnt rapedly over a large region of
country Brs Young Kimball & several others went
several miles in the evening on our road to examine
the fire & other things. distance 3 miles


~ Monday


3rd The hunters were called together in the morning
20 in number to go into the bluffs for a still hunt for
bluffs buffalo & other game we started out with
two waggons to bring in the game I had taken a
severe cold & setled in my side whare I was hurt
last fall & it made me sick & I was not able
to go out yet I started with the company as I
was among the hunters I had Jar[r]ed myself

Page 44

badly in my hard buffalo chase on Saturday & I now
was feeling its effects at the same time the hunters
started. Another company was formed to go & explore out
the rout & see if we could get grass for our horses as the
Indians had been burning it up for several days. We went
into the bluffs & seperated into two Parties 10 in each
& we travled some 10 miles back & & forth over the hills
& saw no game except antelope & wolvesNo I felt so
unwell I concluded to go back to camp. A Lyman &
3 others were with me. we set down upon the edge
of the bluff in sight of the camp to rest ourselves & we
saw a company of 20 horsman approaching ^us^ from the
camp in haste bearing a red flag when they got within
half a mile of us we trailed our arms & went down
to meet them. they informed us that the party that
went up the river had come upon an encampment
of about 400 Indian warriors. A party of about 100
had followed them down a ravene to cut off their
retreat probably with the Intention of rob[b]ing them
of their horses & clothing & would take life if they could
not do it with out & this company of horsman
had come to us to call in the hunters to camp so
we went in the hunters in coming in with the
horsman came across a herd of buffalo & brought
into camp 3 calf, & 4 antelope they kept out a good
guard during the night & we had no disturbance the
cannon was fired twice early in the morning to let
the Indians know we were awake. I had a vary
severe night with my side was in much pain we
had some ^a great^ dew & frost during the night. 12


~ Tuesday


4th Thermometer stands at 33° this morning I feel
some better than I did last night we started on
our journey this morning 5 waggons a breast which made
5 roads this was to be in readiness in case of an attack from
the Indians we travled 3 miles & saw some waggons on the
opposite side of the river. going down the Platt soon one of the
men waded the Platt & came to us, to see who we were. He info-
rmed us they were traders from fort Laramee he had been
there 3 years had not tasted bread for 2 years, was 16 days from
Laramee the grass was green & good on the south side to that
fort but burnt of on the North side He waided the Platt to
come to us a mile across it & did not go but little above his
knees He would take letters to us to Sarpee who lived near
winter Quarters so the campe stoped & wrote 52 letters to
our familys I was ahead of the company with O Pratt taking
observations & did not know untill the time was nearly up
I then in great haste scribbled a few lines to my wife An epistle
was written to the Church &c. Three Brethren accompanied the
Frenchman accross the Platt to the other men was 9 in all
had not seen an Indian since they left Laramee, stated their
was a ferry at the fort &c agreed to take our letters safe
we drove on 3 miles more & bated our teams untill the Brethren
returned they made a report to the camp of what was
said to them a Council of the whole camp was then called
to deside whether we would cross the Platt or continue up

Page 45

the North side of it we were convinced that it wood
be better for us as a company to cross the river or [illegible]^take^ the
old travled road to Laramee as their was good grass on
the way on that side while the Indians were burning
it all off on the North side of the river where we were
travling but when we took into consideration the
situation of the next company & thousands that would
follow after & as we were the Pioneers & had not our
wives & children with us we thought it best to keep on
the north side of the river & brave the difficulties of
burning Prairies & make a road that should stand as
a permanant rout for the Saints indipendant of the
old emigration rout & let the river seperate the emigrating
companies that they need not quarrel for wood grass
or water & when our next company came along the grass
would be much better for them than it would on the
south side as it would grow up by the time they would get
along. A vote was called & it was unanimous to go on
the north side of the river. So the camp again moved
on, but during the nooning Col Markham drilled the men
in a military capacity, they unshiped the cannon & carried
it on wheels, the Frenchman informed us that he never
saw so many Buffalo ogn on the rout this year they had to
stop several times to let the herd pass so they could get
along, we saw many deer & antelope to day & also wolves
and a few buffalo one large bull came across the
river to us, we rode onto the bank before him & he run
clear back again upon a loap & again crossed below us
we camped at night at a gravel creek or slew a large
herd of buffalo lay but a short distance before us
we travled in all to day 9 m 9 miles


~ Wednesay


5th I was quite sick with the diaree the change from
salt to fresh meat is affecting a number in camp
The 400 Indian warriors that was supposed to be seen
on the 3rd proved to be fals the man was frightened
at a herd of antelope & supposed them to be Indians
we had to keep a guard out this morning to keep
a herd of buffalo from mixing up with our cattle
we have had vary strong south wind for 2 days,
two buffalo bulls at noon were approaching the
herd of cows & men went out & drove them off
we rode up within 3 rods of one that was asleep &
stoped & looked at him for some minutes he awoke &
shook himself & loaped off we met a large herd
in the afternoon the Brethren killed one cow
5 calves & brought a bull calf into camp a live
with the intention of raising it, it would drink
water out of a pail they had some sport in triying
to make it suckle a cow it would try hard to bunt
the men & dogs over & some got hard raps I have
been obliged to keep my bed a part of the day have
suffered much with bowel complaint, when we
stoped for night we soon found ourselves in
the midst of grass on fire & had to return back

Page 46

one mile & camped on a spot of ground on the bank
of the river that was just burned over & no feed
except small patches some took there horses on an
Island near & cut down cotton wood for them
we travled to day 15 miles


~ Thursday


6th I was some better this morning we had some rain last
night I had a poor nights rest. we started early this
morning without feeding (except a little corn) as there was
no grass & travled 3 miles & got beyond the fire left it in our
rear & stop to bait & breakfast on a good spot of grass, this
morning the herds of buffalo speck the plains on both sides
of the river and antelope in great abundance some of
which run into camp, the buffalo calf is dead this morning
that was brought into camp alive last night we continued
our journey saw many herds of buffalo antelope & one large
herd of elk a young buffalo clalf came into camp & followed
us we gave him some milk & left him we travled 10 miles
& nooned on the prairie. we scarsly meet with any timber
now, two antelope were killed this forenoon but as we have
so much meet in camp it is thought best not to kill any more
buffalo untill we need it or any other game. we were visited at
noon with many buffalo Dr Richards G. A. Smith & myself walked
up quite near several buffalo herds & exhamined them through
our glasses they were sheding their coats one bull had a mat
of wool swining by his side, like a loose robe, our herd of
cows started to run among the buffalo & President Young
run his horse to seperate them & had great difficulty in doing it
He lost a spy glass in the chase worth $40, the Brethren
hunted for it a long time but could not find it we
continued to journey among the herds of buffalo & we
are not out of sight of them at all they have eat the
grass out to such a degree that our cattle & horses can
get but vary little to eat we camped near a herd at
night that reached as far as our eyes could extend
there were thousands in it distance of the day 20 m


~ Friday


7th A meeting was called one of the herdsman recieved
a sharp reproof for neglecting the cows yesterday a teem
was called for to take the canon we had an exceding
cold north wind to day we travled 6 miles & camped upon
the bank of the river I should judge we saw 10,000
buffalo to day we came near large herds with a greater propor
tion than usual of calves, yearlings & two year olds we saw
several large ones mired, dead, wolves had commenced eating
some of them we could see wolves upon evry hand
following the herds of buffalo to eat those who die of
wounds, accident or poverty. we had some rain in the
evening. President Young & others rode out in the 6 mile
evening to search out the road a few miles forward &
for the first time on the journey saw & killed a polecat or
skunk. The Rigment was called out in the evening & drilled
Arms inspected &c & found in good order. It was supposed an
Indian was seen crossing the river in the night but was stoped &
did not get ashore

Page 47

~ Saturday


8th A plesant morning. not so cold & winday as yesterday
we did not start untill 10 oclok as our teams wanted rest
as they could not get much as the buffalo had eat all the feed up
Br Wm Clayton prepared a mile gage on his hind waggon
wheel to know how far we travel, I rode forward to day with
the Twelve & others & of all the sights of buffalo that our eyes
beheld was enough to asstonish man thousands upon thousands
would crould together as they came from the bluffs to the
bottom land to go to the river & slues to drink untill the river
& land upon both sides of it was one dark spectacle of moving
objects it looked as though the face of the [e]arth was alive &
moving like the waves of the sea. Br Kimball remarked
that he had herd many buffalo tales told but he never expe-
cted to behold what his eyes now saw the half had not been
told him we saw many dead scattered about & many
wolves following the herds, when we stoped at noon many of
them walked along by the side of our waggons so that
we might easily have shot them down, O P Rockwell did
shoot one through the neck & she droped dead it was a
two year old heifer & good meet there were a great num[ber]
of calves & young cattle in the herds we saw to day we saw
had great difficulty in keeping our cattle & horses from going
among them for if they once get mixed with a herd
it is almost impossible to ever get them again. we
travled to day untill we came to the bluffs that made
down to the river & camped for the night distance 11 1/4 mi


I went onto the top of the highest bluffs that were near
us & took a survey of the surrounding country with our
glasses there being present B. Young H. C. Kimball W Woodruf[f]
& G A Smith the whole sourrounding country north east & west
as far as our vision could extend looked as rough as the sea
in a storm of ridges & valleys of mostly sand with scarcely
any green thing upon it except a little scattering grass &
the Spanish soap root such as the mexicans use for washing
with instead of soap the top resembles a pine apple the
most of any thing I ever saw I brought in one root 24
24 inch long 2 inch in diameter I pounded a little of it up
& it would fill a dish with suds like soap


~ Sunday


9th Sunday As we had no feed around us we took up
[FIGURES] our teams & passed across the bluffs
4 miles & camped for the day I wrote 2 letters one to
Br Ferguson & the other to Br Bevin for Br Wolley to
take with him to Purbelo we had a meeting & a good
one the spirit of God rules over the camp. Peace quietn[ess]
& contentment seems to pervade almost evry breast. the
Twelve met & thought it best for the Brethren not to start for
Pueblo untill they arive at Laramey. In the evening I rode
with the Twelve & others 4 miles up the river & returned we
saw large herds of buffalo come to there watering places
to drink, some geese, cranes & one pole cat 8 miles


~ Monday


10th A cool morning. Before leaving the camp ground a letter
was written to the next camp put into a small box nailed
to a post 12 feet long one end put firm in the ground the

Page 48

other end erect in the air as a guide bord containing the follo
wing words. Open this box and you will find a letter.


316 miles to winter Quarters, Pioneers. Lattitude 41°. (our
friends no doubt will be glad to get the letter as it contains
an account of our Journey.


We travled 6 miles & nooned then travled 4 & camped for
the night our teams are some weak in consequence of not
getting grass for several days as it was eat out by the buff
alo there was one buffalo, one deer & one hare brought
into camp by the hunters to day, & distributed among the
men in camp we have what fresh meat we want daily
the grass is some better to day not but few herds of buff-
alo on our rout, today we passed through some miles of
dead grass which we set on fire to have new feed for
the next company it made a great fire indeed we get
our distance daily now of our travel from a mashine
fixed to a waggon wheel which gives the true distance
we camped to night by an Island of cotton wood 10 m


~ Tuesday


11th quite warm to day we travled 5 miles & made a short halt
then travled 3 1/2 miles & camped a little below the junktion of
the Noth & south forks of the Platt River I felt quite unwell the
use of fresh meet does not as yet agree vary well with me 8 1/2 miles
we see but few buffalo today some antelope & Deer &c


Professor Pratt informed me that he took an observation for
the Longitude May 7th on the opposite bank of the Platt from
whare Freemont gives the Longitude in his travels Professor Pratt
made the Longitude to be 100° 5' 45" making it two seconds of
a degree less than Freemont ownly about 10 rods which was vary
close calculating. He also found the Lat 1/2 a mile west of this nights
encampment to be 41° 7' 44"


~ Wednesday


12th A cool morning. Mercury stands at 41, we had a strong
S. wind through the day we travled 8 miles & nooned we then
travled 4 miles & camped for the night on the bank of
the North fork of the Platt I rode onto the bluffs to take a
survey of the country which was about 3 miles from the
river & we found both on the hills & flatts through the
day, travel that we were traveling over the Soux hunting
ground there had been a large band from 500 to 1000 we
should judge from there signs over the ground from 8 to 10
days before us, they took the brains out of the large buffalo
generally their hides & some of the meet & broke up the
bones for the marrow, 20 100 calves were found dead in one
place with nothing taken but the tongues, legs to the knee
& entrails another place 35 calves were found dead
& washed in heaps whare the buffalo had been chased
acrosse the river & run over the calves in rising the
bank of the river. I found on the bluff their
medicine bag tied to a stick 6 feet long stuck up in the
bank it was what is called kinikinnick composed of
tobacco & bark to smoke I also found a saddle tied to a large
buffalo dung I supposed to show the next party which
way the buffalo had gone I left my horse in the valley
to feed while I went onto a bluff to see the country &
he started off not seeing the camp took the back tract

Page 49

& I had to run after him & while following him,
I run through the great Soux encampmen whare
they had had there lodges while on their hunt I left
my gun there & followed my horse untill I overtook
him with the assistance of Br Fowler who came out from
the encampment & stoped him I then rode back got
my gun examined the ground & should judge their
had been 500 lodges there was acres of ground cove[re]d
with buffalo wool whare they had dressed there skins
they left much stuff scattered over the ground such
as peaces of dressed buffalo & wolf skins mogascins [moccasins]
&c I brought in a good dressed white wolf skin
distance of the day 12 mil


I could see the bluff between the forks of the river
about 10 miles above us the bluffs that I passed over
to day were more fertile & covered with more grass
than any I had seen on the Platt before a young
buffalo was killed & brought in in the evening


~ Thursday


13 Many of the Brethren went out to visit the Indian
encampment & brought in mogasens, parts of robes
leather &c, we have a strong cold nort[h] wind to
day, we travled to day 11 miles & camped on the
west bank of a stream about 12 rods wide with
good ford that empties into the Platt this is nearly
opposite the first bluff that is formed between
the two forks of the Platt, the grass was better th[an]
it had had been, the bluff here for the first time
on the north fork comes hold to the river so that
we have to go over the bluffs with our waggons
there is one thing concerning the Platt river which
is worthy of note, which is not characteristic of any
other river that I have any knowledge of in the world
it is much of the way a mile in wedth & generally
coverd with water but vary shallow when a South
wind blows hard the water all rushes to the north
shore untill one would suppose there was a great rise
in the water let the wind shift & bolow hard from
the North & the watter immediately leaves the north
shore untill one can walk across two thirds of the
river on bare ground & the river constantly ebs &
flows like the tide just according as the wind blows
I went onto the bluffs hunting buffalo in the evening saw
several small herds President Young gave the stream
we camped on the name of the bluff fork.


I dreamed last night we had arived at our journey end
whare we were to build up a stake of Zion. As we came
unto the place there was an open vision of a temple
presented before me I asked some brethren that stood
by me If they saw it they said they did not I gazed
upon it & it was glorious it appeared as though it was
built of white & blue stone the sight of it filled me
with Joy and I awoke, & behold it was a dream 11 m

Page 50

~ Friday


14th I went out early in the morning to hunt some
buffalo I cashed myself in the bank & a large herd
came along, but their old bulls was out as a rear &
front guard & there was none of their young cattle
near enough for me to shooht so they past by I saw
some more coming I way laid them they proved to
be 7 bulls I fired at the youngest one while [he] passed by
but missed him I then returned to camp took
breakfast had a hard shower of rain & some words
with Br Fowler & started out again hunting Br Higby
soon Killed an antelope that was put on board
of a boat called the revenue cutter Phineas Young
& myself went out together waited for buffalo &
antilope I finally got lost among the bluff, but
found my way out again Br Phineas shot
an buck antilope & I carried him into camp
there was 3 antilope & one buffalo bull killed. some of the
hunters thought they herd Indian guns on the opposit side of the
river during the night an Indian cralled up to a pair of mules
that was tied togeth[er] & made a grab to ketch them they sprung & got
away from him one of the guards shot at him & he run all horses
were then brought into the circle & the cannon prepared for firing
but seeing no more it was not fired travled 8 miles


~ Saturday


15th A vary cold North wind & rain we however travled
about 3 miles & camped in the best grass we had found on
the road, most of our road this morning was over & through the
bluffs as they come again bold to the river a large number of
barefoot tracks was seen this morning under the bluff on the
bank of the river, supposed to be the Indians that came down
last night to steal our horses, the rain stoped in the afternoon
& we drove 5 miles & camped on the prairie. distance 8 miles
we saw the bluffs dotted over with buffalo I went out with
some others to hunt them I could not get within about 30
rods of them I shot at the neck of one & the ball went into his
sholdier which crippled him but he hobbled away with
the herd & I did not get him but there were a number
of hunters among the herds & one of them killed a fat
buffalo which was brought into camp. the bluffs again come
down to the river a short distance before us


~ Sunday


[1]6th Sunday still cloudy & cool wind. I did not feel vary
well this morning and did not rise untill 7 oclok which was
two hours after the time when I got out of my carriage
I found all five of my horses standing at the stakes while
all the other horses of the encampment had been feeding
two hours. It was Br John Fowlers business to let them
out but he did not get up untill half an hour after I
did. He Is destitute of the spirit or principle that a faithf-
ul man or servant should possess and it makes it
much harder upon me in the care of the teams &
business than it would if I had a true & faithful man
with me Br Burnham does our cooking which
keeps him vary busy & he has the hardest time of it
as much of the time he has nothing but buffalo dung

Page 51

to make a fire of we are now in a place whare we are
proving ourselves & if we are not faithful we shall come under
condemnation. I rode out to day with Brothers Young
Kimball, Benson Rockwell & Stephens 4 miles over the bluffs
to pick out a road for the camp to go across to get again on
the bottoms we found a road through & returned to the
camp I picked up a young hare which Br Young took in to
camp, we saw herds of buffalo while coming in. Br
Glines went out hunting & shot an antelope & one buffalo
though it was against the rules of the camp & council of
his captain to go hunting on Sunday. we had a good
meeting in the afternoon Br I opened meeting by Prayer
Brs Richards Markham Rockwood & Kimball spoke
& the laws of the camp were read & a good spirit preva[iled]
the channel of the teaching was to harken to council & sustain
the Heads of the Church & go & do what was said unto us
& it would prove a blessing unto us 8 mi


~ Monday


17th It is much more warm & plesant to day than usual our roa[d]
hads been hard to day we came 2 1/2 miles through sandy bluffs, we
again struck the bottom 4 1/2 miles from our camping place but
the bottom was much softer than usual & many slues to cross
we crossed about one dozen streams to day of vary clear water
that come from springs in the bluff from 1 to 10 feet across
them which run almost on the top of the ground without
any bank at all, with hard sand or gravel bottom, the water
however was not as cold as spring water generally is, the
hunters brought in 3 buffalo & it detained the camp some to
get them in, President Young was not pleased with it as
we had so much meet in camp already & they went out
without council. we saw vary large droves of deer to day in
the bottoms the most we have ever seen any day on the road
A young Fawn was picked up & brought into camp & kept
we travled in all to day 12 3/4 miles


I led the camp mostly through the bluffs in the morning before
Before Brothers Young & Kimball came up we rode together
all day picking our roads


~ Tuesday


18th The camp was called together or the captains of companies
& President Young sharply reproved, the hunters for shooting
so much meet when it was not needed & detaining the
camp or for taking life any more than could be helepd and
also the horsman for their indiferance in picking out the
road he said there was but two that had rode thant manifested
any interest in helping him get the camp along. He
spoke vary sharply upon the indiferance of men, & they
rejected the meet when it was brought into camp &c
the camp started out after the meet was disposed of
& the hunters or horsman went forward to pick out the
road instead of going hunting I did not hear a gun fired
on the road during the day Amasa Lyman was one called
by name & reproved for not paying any attention to seeking
out the road, but he was with us to day in that business
we rode 6 miles & cnooned we rode in the afternoon
9 3/4 miles & camped for the night distance of the day 15 3/4 m

Page 52

~ Wednesday


19th we crossed the worse sand hill bluff of about one
mile that we have crossed on the journey & what made it still
worse the rain was pouring down upon us continually we travled
about 1/2 mile on the flat & camped untill the rain was over for
the time being we started again at 3 oclok but it soon began to rain
again hard we travled untill 5 oclok & camped for the night on the bank
of the river we travled 8 miles by the wheelometer 8 miles


I rode forward during the day in the rain & picked out the road
we had the most water fall during the day and evening that we
have met with on the whole journey


~ Thursday


20th we came 7 miles & camped for our nooning on the North
side of the Platt opposite Ash Creek that comes through the
bluffs to the Platt on the south side of the river whare the
Origon road first strikes the north fork of the Platt several
of the brethren went over in a boat that we were taking with
us & exhamined the rock bluffs, road, creek, &c & returned
with some ash. rock, wild curands & cherry &c we came
on 8 3/4 miles & camped for the night we crossed a large
creek about 12 rods across it which we supposed it to be
a creek that Glos Cload called the Rawhiyde we had a
vary good road most of the day on the bank of the
River, we have passed a good deal of rock bluff on both
sides of the river, & some on the south side of the river
was formed into natural terrices, rotundas, squairs &c 50
or 100 feet high looked liked good foundations to build
forts & fortications & strong holds upon they resemble
the work of art & look some like the old castles
of England & Scotland they were level on the top. A short
distance above Ash Creek there is a beautiful ceder Island
in the river which is a good beacon to show travelers wha
res the oregon road strikes the river. we have had
a cool, windy, cloudy day whole distance 15 3/4 m


Brother Egbert drove Br Pratts carriage tongue into
the hind end of my carriage & broke in the end bord
& the water came in when it rained so that it wet my
again things & to day Br Fowler run his waggon into
it again to day but when I spoke to him about it he denyed
it which caused some words between us. we had some
little rain to day. The bluffs on the opposite side that I have
described above are named Castle Bluffs & the stream that was called
rawhide is called Castle Creek


~ Friday


21st Before we left the encampment Br Clayton put up a guide board
with the following inscription for the benefit of the next camp
from winter Quarters 409 miles from the Junction 93 1/4 ceder
bluff
36 1/2 Ash Hollow 8 miles, & 133 from Fort Laramee
we travled to day 7 1/2 miles & nooned in the afternoon 8 m
& camped for the night. we saw 8 or 10 buffalo today but
have not seen but few for several days we saw some deer &
antilope to day I killed a bagger with the jaw bone of a
buffalo. Just as we got to a camping place two Indians came
from the bluffs riding towards us & made signs for us to come
to them several of the brethren went, it was a Sioux Indian & his
wife they talked by signs awhile & went away distance of the day 15 1/2 miles

Page 53

~ Saturday


22. The brethren found a part of a petrified leg bone of a Mamouth
it was from the knee joint downward the piece was 17 inch
long. 11 inches wide & weighed 27 lbs. we travled to day 7 1/2
miles & onooned & in the afternoon 8 miles & camped for
the Sabbath, whole distance of the day 15 1/2 m


our road has been vary strait to day but we came over 2 1/2 miles
of the worst bluff sandy & hilly that we have past on
the rout. we have also past several large creek beds of
dry sand, the bluffs on our rout to day have presented
the most singular natural senery that I ever beheld in
my travels on the earth. It has the greatest appearance
of the old walls & ruins of the castles of Europe from
the size of chimneys to 100 feet square or more, bodies
of earth & rock that appears as though it was formed
out of clay stand erect scattering through the bluffs
from 10 to 100 feet high, with perpendicular
sides as strait as walls of a building while all
the earth around them have been washed away
to their base with rain & time. A spring of cold
water was found in the top of one of these peaks
apparently in a small basin of stone. there are
considerable number of rattle snakes come out of
these bluffs I sayw near a dozen to day a good
share of the rout this afternoon the face of the
earth is barren almost destitute of grass


~ Sunday


23rd ^Sunday^ In company with B Young & the Twelve we visited the
top of two of the highest bluff ruins that lie opposite our
encampment which were truly a curiosity. O. Pratt took a
barometrical observation on the ownly tree which was red ceder
on the top of the ruins or bluff which we visited we had
a fair view of chimney rock from whare we were. I
carried a bleached buffalo bulls head on to the top &
wrote upon it with a pencil our names & distances from
several places for the benefit of the next camp while
Br Fairbanks [blank] was on one of these bluffs he
was bit with a rattlesnake & became vary painful before
he reached camp the Brethren commenced giving
him such things as they thought best. And he soon was
better. The camp met at half past 11 ooclok. E Snow addressed
the Meeting & spoke well. President Young then addressed the
camp in an Interesting manner, said he was satisfyed that
the Lord was with us & Leading us had never seen a company
of people more united than the camp had been thus far on the
journey, that we should pluck the fruits of this mission to all
Eternity that he had many things to teach us but could not
do it ownly in a stake of Zion. But he was well satisfyed
with himself, his brethren the Twelve & the camp at large one
thing he would say to the praise of all, that was not one
had refused to obey his council on the road. His peace with
God was continually like a river & he felt that the spirit of
peace rested upon the whole camp. many good things were
said. Several other brethren followed him after which
meeting was dismissed. we intended to have rode out in the
evening, but we saw that a storm was gathering, & it soon
began to blow vary hard about as much as we could do to
save our waggons bows & covers from being smashed

Page 54

the hard wind continued for about an hour then it commenced
raining & which lasted about one hour accompanied with some hail
it turned vary cold I had fears that some of our horses would
perish with the cold as such changes were freequent in this
region Mr Sarpee related a circumstance that transpired sev
eral years since at about this place on the 22nd of May one
day earlier than this while travling down this fork of the platt
it was warm weather the grass 10 inch high it began to rain
some in the afternoon & turned cold in the evening & before
morning 16 of his best horses were frozen to death by the side
of the waggons & his boates boats froze into the Ice in the river
the changes are vary great in this country & when I see it
turning so cold I coverd all my horses with blankets that
I coudld I got up several times in the night to see to then
It rained occasionally in the night. the horses shook with
cold but morning came & all was alive as soon as they were
let loose they run to warm themselves.


~ Monday


24th It was a cold morning yesterday morning the Thermometer
stood at 52°, at noon 82, & this morning 38 accompanied with
north wind, we travled 10 miles & nooned. I dreamed this mor-
ning that some Indians came into camp in a friendly manner
& stole 6 horses before our eyes & rode off we gave them
chase on horsback & I awoke.


As soon as we camped
this noon two Indians came to the camp they were Sioux
they were well dressed & clean we gave them some dinner
& showed them an Indian dog that had followed us several
days but the dog would not follow them they soon left the
camp. Chimney rock still grows plainer to our view
we drove in the afternoon 6 1/2 miles & camped near the quick
sand mountain that run in a ridge from the river back that
apparently had been heaped up by the wind I rode about
two miles forward to find grass and a camping place and on
my return I saw about 30 Soux Indians Plunge their horses
Into the River on the opposite side & make towards us I rode
with several others to the river & met them as they came
out they shook hands with us, vary friendly, the Chief
unfurled a large American Flag with the Eagle stars & stripes
& presented me a Letter. It was written in french we
however made it out, they were all well dressed the Chief
was dressed in a military coat. the Brethren from Camp
brought a white flag & stuck down by the side of theirs
they wanted to go into Camp we proposed for 5 of them
to go & the rest to remain in Camp but they all wiched
to come so we let them. we gave them supper they
remained about camp all night, but were good & stole
nothing. distance of the day 16 1/2 —


~ Tuesday


25th The Sioux are in camp this morning we gave them
Breakfast they stayed with us untill we started some little
traiding was done they were men women & children they
crossed the river when we left & behaved well we drove
2 miles & dbated our horses, then drove untill 1 oclok & nooned
then drove untill 6 oclok & camped for the night distance 12 m


I was unwell had the Rheumatism in shoulders & back & teeth ake
had to keep the carriage I read Hastings account of Calafornia
He tells some great stories about California & oregon we camped
within about 4 mi[l]es of Chimney rock

Page 55

~ Wednesday


26th we travled 6 1/4 miles & nooned in good grass about 2 miles
above Chimney rock we travled in the afternoon 6 1/4 miles
& camped for the night. The hunters brought in four Antelope
we passed much good grass to day. I rode to day with Br Kimball
& Benson to look out the road I have during the last two days
read Mr Hastings account of Oregon & upper Calafornia. He has
greatly exhagerated the account of upper Calafornia.


Just before camping at noon while travling on a smooth prairie
an accurance took place which liked to have proven of serious
consequence to our camp. An Indian Horse that was bought of the
Sioux ran away with a whi singletree to his heels & gave a trem-
endious fright to the cows, oxen & horses that were attached
to the waggons and in an instant a dozen or more waggons
were darting by each other like lightning & the horses & mules
flying as it were over the ground some turned to the right &
some to the left some run into other waggons, the horse & mule
that Br Fowler was driving leaped with all spead, with Br
Little hold of the lines & Br Fowler hold of the bits they darted
by my carriage like electricity & came within one inch of a
collission with my wheels if they had locked we should have
been a wreck another waggon followed by in the same manner
with a pair of Mules & one yoke of cattle upon a keen run which
would also have smashed my carriage if they had hit it but
my own horses by this time started to run but was soon
held up by the driver, Br Fowlers waggon continued to rooll
regardless of rough or smooth ground for about fifty rods &
he draged the whole distance by the bit which was the
case with many others, but all was soon stoped & returned
to there lines without any accident to any team or waggon
which appeared to me truly a miricle William Smoots team
run away also with great speed. It give us sumthing of an
Idea what an Indian yell would would do in such an encamp-
ment with teams hitched to waggons. A person can hardly
concieve of the power that is manifest in animals esspecially
mules when in such a fright. But I felt thankful that no
accident happened.


By an Imperfect measurment, by a Trigonometrical observation
by the Sexton Professor Pratt made the Chimney rock to be 260 feet
above the level of the river. distance of the day 12 1/2 m


~ Thursday


27th we started 15 m before 8 oclok travled in a strait line 8 mile
& nooned in good grass Br Kimball & myself picked the road
in the foornoon & it was left to me in the afternoon & I piloted
the road in the afternoon as strait as any road that had been
made on the whole rout & picked out a camping ground on
the bank of the river in good feed we travled 5 3/4 miles 13 3/4


It should be understood that we are piloting a road for
the House of Israel to travel in for many years to come
therefore it requires the greater care. The hunters brought
in 5 Antilope to day. we camped at half past 4 oclock
opposite Scotts Bluff at Lattitude 41º, 50', 52." the wedth
of the river 772 yards a wind soon arose accompanied by
thunder & lightning we had but little rain.

Page 56

~ Friday


28th A cold rainy morning the camp concluded not to start
untill it stop raining. so we started at 10 oclok & travled 11 1/2
miles & camped for the night on the bank of the river it was a damp
cold day we passed alongside of a clear strem of water with some
beaver dams & houses upon it at one place it raised the water about
two feet which was lined with fish a good share of which was
speckled trout so the brethren informed me this is the first strea-
m I have met with containing trout since I left the New
England
States. Therefore I name it trout creek it was not more
than 3 miles long it arose from a large pure spring. it was but a little
above Scotts Bluffs [FIGURE] distance of the day 11 1/2


during the evening President Young called at my fire & seeing
several of the brethering playing dominoes in a waggon near
by began to teach by saying that the devil was getting power over
the camp that for several days past nearly the whole camp had
drank into a spirit of card, checker, & domino playing & dancing
& the spirit of folley & if they did not spedily repent their
works, labours, & journey would be in vain that we should
not accomplish the object for which we had come but should
be thwarted in it. He said the Camp did not quarel any to be
shure for the devel would not set them to quarreling as long
as he could draw them away gradually from duty & fill them
with nonsens & folley, for the devil was vary cuning in dra-
wing away the people of God. I felt the force of his remarks
& thought them necessary. during the evening I went in to
the doctors waggon, read a chapter in the Book of Mormon
& prayed with them. After which B Young H. C. Kimball
W Richards E. T. Benson & W. Woodruff met in council
in Br Youngs waggon & Br Young wrote some of the
word of the Lord concerning the camp & expressed
his views & feelings concerning the camp that they must
spedily repent or they would be cursed, that they were
forgetting their mission & he had rather travel with
10 righteous men who would keep the commandments
of God than the whole camp while in a carless manner
& forgetting God, we stayed untill 10 oclok & retired to
rest


~ Saturday


29th A cold rainy morning. At 10 oclok the horn was blown
to gather up the horses & cattle which took more than an hours
after which President Young called the camp together and
required each Captain to seperate or calle out his men & when
it was found all was present except two who had gone a
hunting he then addressed them, sumthing in the following
language, I think I will take for my text to preach my sermon
from, I am about to revolt from travling with this camp
any further with the spirit they now possess, I had rather
risk myself among the savages with ten men that are men
of faith, men of mighty prayer men of God, than to be with
this whole camp when they forget God & turn there hearts
to folley & wickedness, yea I had rather be alone, & I am
now resolved not to go any further with the camp unless
you will covenant to humble yourselves before the Lord &
serve him & quit your folley & wickedness, for a week past
nearly the whole camp has been card playing, chequres
& dominnoes, have occupied the attention of the brethren

Page 57

& dancing, & Nigering & Hoeing down all has been the bet
continually, now it is quite time to quit it, & there has been
trials & law suits upon evry nonsensical thing & if these things
are suffered to go on it will be but a short time befor you
will be fighting knocking each other down & taking life
& it is high time it was stoped, I do not want to hear any
more such reportts as I herd last Sunday. of mens going to
meeting & preaching to the rest after he had played cards
untill meeting time, you are a putty set of men going
to seek out a location among the mountains for a resting place
of the Saints, even the whole Church of God who have been
driven out from the gentiles & rejected of them and after
you have esstablished a location you are then going out to preah
the gospel, seal salvation upon the House of Israel, & gather
the nations. How would you look if they should know your
conduct & ask you what did you do when you went to
seek out Zion, & find a resting place for the Saints whare
the Standard of the Kingdom of God could be reared & her
banners unfurled for the nations to gather unto, dut you
spend a good deal of your time in dancing pitching quare[l],
Jumping wrastleing &c yes, yes, did you play cards, dice
checkers & dominoes O! yes, what could you do with you-
rself, why you would shrink from the glance of the yeyes
of God Angels & men even wicked men, then are you
not ashamed of yourselves for practicing these things
yes you are & you must quit it. After speaking sumwhat
lengthy upon these matters he called the Twelve together
the High priest, Seventies & Elders, & found to be 8
of the quorum of the Twelve. 18 High Priest. 80 Seventies
& 8 Elders after which President Young said unto the
Twelve If you are willing to humble yourselves before
the Lord & covenant to do right & walk humble before
him, make it manifest by raising the right hand
when each one raised their hand, the same question
was put to the High Priest, Seventies, Elders & Members
& all universally covenanted with uplifted hand to humble
themselves before the Lord repent of their sins & keep
his commandments. President Young then spoke of those
who was not in the Church as there were sum present that
they would be protected in their rights but they must
not introduce wickedness in the Camp for it would not
be sufferd. He then spoke of the standard & ensign that
would be reared in Zion, to govern the Kingdom of God
[FIGURE] and the nations of the earth for evry nation
would bow the knea & evry tongue confess that
JESUS was the Christ [Mosiah 27:31] and this will be the
standard. The Kingdom of God & his Laws & Judgment in
{the hands of his servants Ahman Christ} And on the standard would be a flag
of evry nation under heaven so their would be an invitation to all
Nations under heaven to come unto Zion, the Saints would have
to keep the Celestial law, and all nations & religions would
have to bow the knee to God and accknowledge that Jesus was
the Christ, but they would not be under the necessity of
being baptized or embracing the Gospel of Christ, but
they must acknowledge the right & reign of Christ

Page 58

then if they felt disposed to reject the gospel & be damned they had
a right to, & the Saints or inhabitants of Zion had no right to take
from them their religion or persecute them on account of it or
trample upon their rights any way, neither should other nations
or religions trample upon the rights & privileges of the Saints who serve
& obey the Lord of [and] Keep his Commandments neither would that
be suffered as it has been in times past. And upon this principle
all men or religions may dwell with us in peace, if they will
keep the outward laws of the kingdom of [God] so as to acknowledg his
name & his right to reign & let us keep the law of the gospel &
obey his commandments undisturbed. After making other rem-
arks he left the meeting in the hands of the rest of the Twelve
Elder Kimball followed & remarked that what President Young said
it was the word of the Lord unto him & was just as much binding
upon him as though it was a written Revelation and it was just
as much binding upon the whole camp as it was upon him & urged
the Saints to give heed to the teachings that were given.


O Pratt followed & said that if the Saints had leasure hours
that they could spend them to much better advantage than playing
Cards as there was a world of Knowledge to be obtained & evry leasure
moment should be improved in storeing the mind with some sciensce or
learning some good principle and acknowledged the teachings we
had recieved to be of the Lord


W. Woodruff arose & said he had some things in his heart he
wished to say, that a burned child dreaded the fire. He had not
forgotton his journey in the Camp of 1834 and should he
live to the age of Matheusala he should not forget the hour when
the Prophet & Seer Joseph Smith stood upon the waggon
wheel & addressed that Camp & said that because they had
not harkened to his Councel but disobeyed, & transgressed
from time to time, that the die was cast & Judgment
must come that we should be visited by the destroying Angels
And so we were & more than twenty of our numbers
fell by the stroke & we all suffered much in our feelings
And I pray the Lord I may not see another such a time
And I would now advise my brethren to be careful in keeping the Coven[an]t
ywe have made lest by & by the word of the Lord come unto us as in
the days of Joseph & we cannot escape his judgment. I would
advise all the Brethren who have got cards to burn them up for
also checkers & dominoes, for if you keep your covenants you
have made you will have no time to use them & they will be
useless lomber on your hands. if you keep them for your children
they will ownly prove, a curse to them. And my prayer to God
is thayt we all may be enabled to keep all our covenants
with the Lord & each other I rejoice that the watchman
upon the walls or in our mids are quick to comprehend & warn
us of evil & reprove us when wrong that we may de saved & do
the will of God


Br S. Markham arose confessed his sins for card playing on sunday
before he went to preach & asked forgivness, then the camp
dispersed to there waggons & we all started on our journey
Br G. A. Smith & myself went together to pilot out the road
we travled 8 1/2 miles & camped for the night in good feed
though the whole Country was vary barren that we had
[page torn] [come] through. we passed today through layers of good

Page 59

sand stone in the edge of the bluffs one large rock resembled
the hull of a steemboat loaded with freight so I named it
Stone Steem boat bluff. it commenced raining before we
camped it was vary cold, distance of the day 8 1/2 m
during the evening Br B. Young went out with the Twelve
& had Prayes


~ Sunday


30th Sunday we set this day apart for Prayer & fasting, in
the morning I shaved & washed all over & anointed my head &
put on clean clothing, read a chapter in the Book of Mormon
& humbled myself before the Lord & poured out my soul in
prayer before the Lord & his spirit desended upon me &
I was blessed. I spent some time in writing my Journal. The
camp had a Prayer meeting, in the morning & met again in
public Meeting, President Young in company with the quorum of
the Twelve & a few others went into the vally of the hills & according
to the order of the Priesthood prayed in a circle & Porter &
Br Carrington watched to see that no Indians come upon us, we had
a good time, there was a heavy storm appeared but it mostly went
around there was but little rain whare we were, we returned to
our waggons & took some refreshment having eaten nothing during
the day, soon the Son came out plain & plesant. In the evening I
went out 2 miles with the quorum of the Twelve onto a high
bluff & had a good views of the Black Hills also Prayers


~ Monday


31st There are many portions of this country vary barren we travel
over several miles at a time of level prairie with little or no grass upon
it in this ground we find great quantities of the Prickelly pair &
they are an excellent plant to eat though coverd with thorns like
needles which have to be carefully paired off with a knife & fork
they are quite delicious have a little tart but vary plesant


we had a plesant morning, our cattle was strayed so far it
took about 2 hours to get them up & get ready for starting
we however started at 8 oclock & travled 9 1/2 miles & nooned on a
green flat most of the ground through the day was vary barren
grass is again getting vary scarce Br Pratt took an observation,
& found the Lattitude to be 42º 4' 30" we travled in the after-
noon 7 1/4 miles & camped upon the bank of a creek about 15 or
20 miles below Laramie the hunters brought in one long tailed
deer saw several Elk & Antilope but got none of them I went
forward to pick out the road through the day I felt some unwell
with teeth ake & canker in my mouth. distance of the day 16 3/4


I would here mention that which belonged to the mornngs account
that there was a crust of frost over the grass the Thermometer
stood at 35, at 5 oclok, we passed to day a grove of large
cotton wood but the Sioux had wintered in it & cut down
the most of it for brows & wood, we are begining to
come to wood more plenty but the Camp has had much
difficulty to obtain wood to cook with for the last
weeks as we had neith[er] timber nor Buffalo chips. the
men would follow the river bank all day & Islands
to pick up any wood sticks barks or chips that might
chanced to have lodged on the bank by the flood or
that the Indians may have left, but it is now
to be readily obtained it is supposed that the creek
we camp on to night is the rawhide

Page 60

~ Tuesday


June 1st 1847 A fine pleasant morning, I had suffered much
from the tooth ake of late, I went, before starting on the journey
to Luke Johnson a dentist & got my tooth part of it dug out is &
broke of[f] & left the stump in my Jaw which pained me through
the day we travled 6 miles & nooned whare we had but
little feed, we travled in the afternoon [blank] miles & camped on
the bank of the platt opposite of Fort Laramie within
1 1/2 miles of the fort. when we arived we saw some men
approaching us from the fort when they arived on the
bank we found them to be a part of the company of
the Missisippi Brethren who had been to Pueblo through
the winter, Brother Crow & his family 7 waggons & 14 souls
were the individuals who were at the fort they soon stood upon
the bank of the river we lanced [launched] our boat & crossed the stream to them
several of the brethren went over to them among whom was Br Brown
that led up the same company to this place last year, they were truly glad
to meet, No one can imagin the joy of friends on meeting each other
under such circumstances away from the abodes of white
men whare they are ownly visited by Savages. Br Crow came across
& met in Council with us. And informed us that the remainder
of the Missippi company with the portion of the Mormon Battalion that
was at Pueblo would start for Laramie about the first of June
& follow our trail onto Calafornia. He informed us of 4 of the breth-
ren who had died one of which was Arnold Stephens, had herd
nothing of the main body of the Battlion. He soon returned home
& the camp met together, President Young suggested the propriety
of our leaving all our plows at the fort except such as we
should want to use immediately when we got there, to do up our Black-
smithing, Burning Coal, mending waggons &c as soon as possible
so that we could go on our Journey as spedily as possible, a
company was appointed to do herding & to attend to all these branches
of business, we then retired to rest I am quite unwell &
have been for several days I have canker in the mouth, bleed at
the noose, do not rest well nights distance of the day 12 m


~ Wednesday


2nd In company with the Twelve & others I crossed to the river
to visit the fort & those who inhabit it we exhamined fort St John
which is now evacuated but the walls are standing the diment-
ions of St John are 144 by 132 outside, the Inside of the fort
contained 16 rooms, 7 rooms on the North west & 7 on the South
east one on the South, the largest on the north 98 feet long 47 wide
the Oregon trail runs one rod from the S.W. cornor of the fort
we next visited Fort Larimie now occupied by 38 persons
French mostly, who have Married the Sioux Mr Burdow is the
superinteder this fort is 168 by 116 outside, theer are 6 rooms
upon two sides, & 3 rooms upon the north & 3 upon the south
uccopied by stores blacksmith & dwellings it is quite a plesant
situation for a fort. Mr Burdow was a, Frenchman and a
Gentleman. He recieved us kindly and invited us into a large
setting room on the north side of the Fort, elevated about 10
feet from the ground, a flight of stairs leading to it gave us
any information he could in relation to our rout. Also fur-
nished us with his flat boat on reasonable terms to assist us in ferr
ying the Platt. He informed us that Gov Boogs & his men
had much to say against the mormons & cautioned him to
take care of his horses cattle &c lest we should steal them
[page torn] [to prej] gudice him against us all he could he said

Page 61

that Boggs company was quarrelling all the time & most
of the company had deserted him. He finally told Boggs & co
that let the Mormons be as bad as they would they could not
be any wors than He & his men were He Had A number of
Soux women & children around him while we were there
About 20 of the Sioux, men, women & children came with
Peltry to the trading House. Provisions of All kinds were
vary high & goods at the store flour 25 cts a pound tobacco
$1.50 cts per lb. After conversing with him for a length of time
we got into the flat boat about 20 of us & went down the
Laramie fork to its mouth about 2 miles, & up the platt half a mile
to our camp. After dinner we met in council & there decided
that Azama Ameza Lyman go to Pueblo with several other
brethren to meet the detachment of the Battalion that was there
for them to come As soon as convenient to Laramie & follow
our trail to Calafornia. I finished the letters to send to
Bevein & Ferguson I picked some greens & had a good dinner
of then though I am not well to day


~ Thursday


3rd A vary winday day we commenced before sun ris to ferry
over our boats my ten was the first that went over the wind was
favorable we saw 3 men arive on pack Horses last evening
at the fort on the oregon road we ascertained this morning they
were from St Josepheth they report 2000 waggons on the road
to Oregon from St Joes they are divided into companies of 20
to 50 waggons & that they will arive here tomorrow the first co
Mr Bordow called down to see us cross today. We set up our
Blacksmiths shops in the old fort to do our work, & made fires to do
our washing Br Burnham done my washing to day the fistrst time
I have washed my clothing since I left winter quarters. Br
Frost set 6 shoes for me today & 2 for Br Smoot. In the evening
I walked up onto the Highest peak around us, in company
with the Twelve & others we took A vew of the surrounding
country on our return to the camp we visited the Indian
& French Burying ground the Indians were laid up upon
A staging about 10 feet from the ground, the French were
buried in the ground strong pickets around with a cross
at the head being Catholics, snow was discoverd upon the
mountains through glasses


~ Friday


4th ^4th^ [FIGURE 1] [FIGURE 1] I wrote two letters to day one to Mrs W.
& one to Aphek Woodruff A. O. Smoot & J Benbow &
left them in the Hands of Mr [blank]
who keeps the store & Acks As post Maste[r]s He appeared
vary friendly said He would forward our letters that wer[e]s
to go to winter Quarters to the care of Mr Sarpee & those
that were to be deliverd to the Mormon camp would deliver
them to the leader of the camp on our Arival. He truly
manifested much friendship towards us. Professor
Pratt took observations at the fort for the Longitude
at the fort.


I conversed with A mountaineer who had wintered at
the great Basin of the Salt & Eutau lakes & he recommends
the country vary Highly for A healthy fertile country
the Lakes & streams Abounding with trout & other fish

Page 62

A good supply of shugar maple & other timber before we
left Br Clayton erected A guide board on the north side of
the river containing the following informations which He
took from his Journals on the distances which was correct
as it was obtained from the wheelometer


543 1/4 miles from Winter Quarters 227 1/2 miles from the
Junction of the Platt. 142 1/4 miles from Ash Hollow
70 1/4 miles from Chimney Rock And 50 1/2 from Scotts Bluff.
we left the Fort & started on our Journey we took the right hand
road up up the platt & travled 8 1/4 miles & camped for the night, the
travel now Appears to be attended with A good deal of interest
as we begin to ascend the black Hills which are universally coverd
with pine & ceder we saw one vary High peak coverd the top
with snow Br Robert Crow Joined us which Added to our compa
ny 9 men 5 women 3 children 6 waggons 13 yoke of oxen
20 cows 3 Bulls 10 young cattle And Horses which makes in the
whole camp 148 men, 8 women, 5 children, 79 waggons
96 Horses 51 Mules, 90 oxen, 43 cows 3 Bulls 9 calves, 16 dogs
And 16 chickins


I was in great pain in the Afternoon & night with the nervous Head & teeth Ake 8 1/2 [miles]


~ Saturday


5th
we have freequent slight showers yesterday & today while among the
hills I was sum better to day we had quite A rough road to day
we travled up & down the Hills untill we arived at what is
called the warm spring which is at the fork of the two
roads that comes from Laramie we here nooned & visited the
head of the spring which was quite warm for drinking water
It boiled out of the bluff & made A little rivulet about 4 feet
wide & 3 inches deep it was clear soft water but no warmer
than I have freequently found water in rivulets exposed to the
sun, the bluffs, peaks, & Hills begin to be more lofty as we got
into the Hills we are begining to come to an elk, bear & mountain
sheep country, we saw their signs to day we came in the foornoon
6 1/2 miles making 15 miles from Laramie to the springs soon
after we arived the first company of Moissouri emigrants came
up 12 waggons of them. Professor Pratt took an observation
for the Lattitude At the head of the warm spring & found it to be
42º 15' 6" we travled in the Afternoon 10 1/2 miles & camped
on the west side of A small pure stream of water in good feed
the Missouri company camped 1/4 of a mile below us on the same
stream, they started this morning from the fort & took the
South road which is 5 miles nearer than the North road which we
took & A much better road distance of the day 17 miles


~ Sunday


6th Sunday this day was Also devoted to prayer & fasting, the
Missouri company that camped near us started on this morning
I am still troubled with the teeth ake. the camp met for
A prayer meeting at 8 oclok the spirit of the Lord was with
the people, the camp Also met for A preaching meeting at 11 oclok
we had A shower of rain & the meeting closed Another company
of Mo waggons of 20 passed us it soon cleared off & the camped
moved forward 5 miles & camped for the night on Bitter C
Creek
whare the road leaves the creek for the Hills we camped
between between the two Mo encampments one each side
of [page torn] waggons in one & 20 in the other And A plenty of grass 5 [miles]

Page 63

~ Monday


7th The two companies started out before us this morning
we travled 7 3/4 miles & nooned on A small creek which
scarsly afforded water for our stock & but little grass, while
here Another Mo company of 13 waggons passed us we were in
fair view of Laramie Peak with its top coverd with snow.
I found an Abundance of sweet thisaly in the bitter creek
bottom whare we camped last night much of the shrubery
which we past to day was the black currand & goosbury
we travled this Afternoon 5 1/4 miles & camped for the night on
the Horse shoe Creek in the most splendid feed we have met
with on the journey the other three companies went ahead
Hors shoe Creek is heavily timbered with cotton wood Ash
& willow it is quite A large stream I went to fishing with
a hook & line to see if I could not get some trout but I
cought nothing, the Black Hills Are A good deal timbered
with pine. The Hunters brought in two black tailed deer
& one Antilope to night, distance of the day 13 mils


Professor Pratt took several Barometrical observations at Larimie
during 3 days & found the highth above the level of the sea to be
4090 feet, the Tattitude was 42º 12' 13". By a mean of
six six sights with a good sextant the Longitude west from
Greenwich was in time 6h 56m 47s.5 equal to 104º 11' 53"
Lat. of the warm springs west of Laramie 42º 15' 6"


~ Tuesday


8th we travled 6 3/4 miles & nooned upon A small creek
with little water & fair grass we formed A company of
men & went forward of the teams & cleaned the road of
stone we used pick Axes, bars, spades &c it was A great
help to our week waggons the road was exceding Hilly
& mountaineous, in the Afternoon we travled 8 3/4 over
the most mountaineous road we have had on the rout
we then deesended into A valley & camped for the night
on Labont Creek with an abundance of timber water
& good grass. we saw nothing of the Mo companies
Br John Higby went forward Hunting & saw them
when they started out, & they had such strife one with
another in trying to start first they did not stop to
milk their cows, & in clearing up their breakfast they
stewed their meal, salt, bacon, short cake, Jonney cake
Beans & other things upon the ground through their
encampment & when we came up 3 wolves were
feeding upon the fragments I picked up a pocket knife
& spoon left upon the ground.


When we came
over the high Hills to day it was so cold it pierced
us like winter when we reached the valley we
found fires the companies in advanced had built
we piled on the wood, soon got warm An Antelope
lay before us the Hunters had brought in we carved it up
with our knives & stuck it on sticks & roasted it on the
fire & it satisfyed our Appetites finely without salt
Some traidere came into camp from the mountain
on their way to the fort G. A. Smith sent A letter
by them back to the fort distance 15 1/2 m


during the evening we visited the traiders & got some inform
ation from the salt lake country which was flattering or good
account was given of it

Page 64

~ Wednesday


9th We started at 5 oclok & drove one mile into better feed
& turned out our teams, the brethren traided some for robes
mogacines, & skin shirts & pants with the Hunters who camped
near us And at about 7 oclock 15 waggons of our party was chosen
to go forward to make A boat to ferry the Platt; they went forward
we followed them, the traiders started At the same time soon another
party of traiders overtook who were direct from Santifee they
informed us the Mormon Battalion was at Calafornia went in
Jan & that Capt Brown was in Santafee for money for the detach
ment & would come on as soon as possible we travled 11 1/4 miles
& nooned in a valley without watter, in the Afternoon we trav
led 8 miles & camped upon A'la'preel Creek when we rode up
to the creek we overtook our little pioneer company that we sent
on In the morning to built the boat, the Missouri company was also
in sight notwithstanding their exhertion to get ahead of us, our
detachment followed the Mo company how far they travled I know
not our Hunters killed two Black tailed deer & one Antilope
yesterday & An Antilope today I am still troubled much with the
teeth Ake with the exception of this I feel vary well distance 19 1/4 [miles]


~ Thursday


10th In company with G. A. Smith I went forward to A large
creek 8 3/4 miles from our camping place Here we overtook the Mo
Company
they were about 4 miles from our camp we nooned upon
this creek, in the Afternoon we reached the platt river &
camped upon deer creek, 9 miles whole distance of the day 17 3/4 [miles]
I examined A splendid grind stone queyry on the east side
of the road as it leaves the Hills & strikes the platt At was
30 rods long above the ground & could readily be got at the
grit, was fine & nise the Hunters brought in two Antilope. We
have good feed & our Horses & cattle are gaining. In the after-
noon Presidents Young & Kimball rode with us. our detac-
hed company camped last night withe fore most company
& we have not herd from them since. Br Carrington
found A vary extensive coal bed on this creek one layer
of about 10 feet thick another 5 feet length not known
but was examined for 20 rods or more the specemins of
coal produced wer excellent, the Twelve walked on to the
river bank examined the river, feed, &c had prayers
& returned. At the blowing of the Horn I did not feel
much like retiring to bed so I walked 1/2 a mile from the
camp on the bank of Deer Creek & found Br Clayton
fishing with a hook He dHad caught about two dozen good
fish Another Br Harmon had caught some they resem-
bled the eastern Herrin, they were about to leaves & they left
their lines for me to fish with so I sat down for half
an hour musing alone as unconcerned as though I had been
sitting upon the banks of Farmington river, vary suddenly
I herd A rustling in the bushes near me & for the first time
time the thought flashed across my mind, that I was in
A country Abounding with the griselly, bear wolves & India-
ns, And was liable to be attacked by either of them ant any
moment & was half a mile from any company & had no weapon
not even enough to have defend myself against A Badger
& I thought wisdom dictated for me to return to camp so I
took up my polls & fish & walked leasurelly home & retired
to rest which closed the business of the day

Page 65

~ Friday


11th we rode 9 miles & camped upon the Platt bottom
for nooning, we travled in the afternoon 8 miles & camped upon
the bank of the Platt within a short distance of the Mo
camp
who were trying to ferry over their waggons, they reported
our camp to be at the ferry 10 miles or so above us, the
hunters brought in 13 antelops. the Mo company had killed 3
buffalo. A young antelope had hid behind a bunch of sage
to keep out of the way of the hunters I discoverd him & crawld
up & caught him in my hands but he gave such a spring he cleared
himself from me.


we rode our horses into the river to day
several times to se[e] if we could find a fording place but we could
not find any as the stream had risen by the melting snows of
the mountains, we passed some snow to day on the highest
peaks distance of the day 17 m


~ Saturday


12th I started in the morning to go forward in company
with Br A. P. Rockwood who was riding President Young
Stud when suddenly he sprung upon my horse but
instead of striking my horse he took my knee into his
Jaw & bruised me considerable sunk one tooth to
the bone through three thicknesses of clothing &
one of them buck skin G A Smith & myself then
rode on to the ferrying ground & found our detachment ferrying
over the Missouri Company they paid the Brethren
$1.50 cts per each waggon & load, & paid in flour at $2.50
per cwt, generally flour is considerd worth at the forts through
this country at least $10 per cwt. It was difficult getting
over the river they carried the goods over in a boat &
drew the waggons over by hand with ropses but when the
curant struck them they would freequently rool several
times over in the watter & smash their bows out they also
came near drowning their horses and one man would have
been lost if the brethren had not picked him out with
the boat, we saw also on the road whare the company had
a run away of their teams a horse came runing among them
& frightened their oxen and they all started to run two
run up onto a bank & turned both waggons over with
women & children in & bruised them much, smashed jars
crockery, dishes, boxes & sundrys to peaces. one team run
into the river & would probably have drowned & lost all
had not a little boy jumped out beside the off ox which
frightend him & he out run the other hawed off & run
onto a sand bar he however kicked the boy against the
wheel & the wheel knocked [him] down into the water which
hurt him, but the seene ended without any loss of life.


The Blacksmiths had been to work for the Missouri Company
got flour money &c the company of 5 traiders had camped
near the brethren. Our hunters had been busily engaged in
getting game, they had killed 5 fat buffalo 4 bear one
old she bear & 3 cubs, & shot at 2 griselly bear but did not
get them those killed were the black bear. saw a plenty of
antiope deer Elk & Mountain Sheep the mountains near
us abound with bear & other game I found some buffalo meat
the hunters were not agoing to save, so I cut out of the hump
of a buffalo about 40 lbs of good fat stake & spread it
to dry also tryed out about 8 lbs of good tallow

Page 66

I visited the traiders camp they also was drying fine fat
Buffalo, one of the bears feet that was killed measured
7 1/2 inches long 5 inch wide 2 1/2 inch thick two toe nails 2 3/4 inch
long 3/4 inch wide. Our Hunters brought into camp 8 antilope
the camp came up & camped within one mile of the ferry ground
in good feed had travled 11 1/4 miles 11 1/4 m


~ Sunday


13th Sunday A vary warm day the camp met for prayer
meeting at 9 oclok. O. P. Rockwell, Brown, and another
man were out all night hunting. One of the men of the camp
started out at dark to go to the mountain to get some snow
the distance looked so short he said he could go & return before 8 oclok
& was foolish enough to make a bet of one dollar upon it, but he did not
get to the mountain by 8 oclok & about 10 oclok a company of hors-
man was sent out with a bugle after him fearing the bears would
eat him up.


We had a meeting at 10 oclok H. C. Kimball addressed
the meeting in an interesting manner, & was followed by Br Young
who spoke upon the liberty of the gospel, showed what it done
for us, saved us daily, exhaulted us to glory immortality & eternal
life
brought us evry good thing, but in doing this it did not
do away with the law of God or the dictation of the Almighty
Some thought they wanted their liberty to curse, swear, stray
whare they were a mind to, run over the mountains, not regard
the laws & rules of the Camp, but would that be liberty, not it
would lead to death & not life, the man that left the camp & went
to the mountains last night, had he have met a bear he would have had
the liberty to have run for his cli life, clumb a tree or been destroyed
The way to worship God the most acceptable is to do each day the
vary things that will bring the most good to the human family
there is a great differance to be seen between us as a camp & the
Missouri companies that are going the same road or a part of the way
they curse & swear, rip & tare, & are a trying to swallow up the earth, but
though they do not wish us to have a place on earth the earth will soon
swallow them up & they will go to the land of forgetfulness, while the
Saints if faithful though they should suffer some privations here will
ultimately inherit the earth & increase in dominion power & glory untill
the Lord shall say to them, go to now make your thousands of worlds
& people them & make such laws to govern them as you are a mind
to for I Know you have no disposition to make any laws but those
that are good, for you always desired to do good on the earth, &
many other goodly words did he say unto our edefycation. He was
followed by O Pratt who exhorted us to give head to the teaching
we had herd & to improve our time in treasuring up usful knowledge
that we ought not to spend a moments time needlessly. Meeting
dismissed and the Twelve, Colonels, Captains, &c of the Camp
met at the Presidents waggon to consult upon what measures
to adopt to get across the river it was finally agreed to go immedi-
ately to the mountains with a waggon & team for evry two tens
& get poolls & lash two or four waggons abrest to keep them
from turning over & float them across the river with boats &
ropes, so a company of horsmen started for the mountains & teams
draw the polls. In the evening the flour meal & bacon was
[page covered] [d]istributed through the Camp equally that had been recieved
[page covered] [fr]om the Mo company for ferrying them over, it amounted to
[page covered] 1/2 lbs of flour 2 lbs of meal & a small peace of bacon to each
[page covered] [in]dividual in the Camp. It looked as much of a miricle to me

Page 67

to see our flour & meal bags replenished in the midst of the black
Hills
as it did to have the Children of Israel fed with manna
in the wilderness. [Exodus 16:30] But the Lord has truly been with us on this
journey we have had peace & union in our midst, our horses & cattle
have been wonderfully preserved from death & accident on the
way & our waggons from breaking down. Great good will grow out
of this mission if we are faithful in keeping the commandments of God


I have taken great delight of late in reading the book of Mormon seeing
the great & glorious things revealed & recorded in that book & that we are
now trying to fulfill the great things or some of them that Lehi Nephi
Alma, Moroni, Isaiah and many other prophets had in view in the last
days in building up Zion, redeeming Israel, warning the Nations &
sealing salvation upon the meek of the earth & laying a foundation
that the earth may be prepared for the coming of the Mesiah.


~ Monday


14th At day light the two first tewo tens were called togethe
to make arangments for crossing. The Proposal was made in the
camp to lash 4 waggons together & float them but the curant
was so strong many did not like that moad we appointed Br
Grover as our Captain to direct the rafting over we finally con-
cluded to put our polls into a raft carry our goods over in a
boat & put our waggons onto a raft we commenced at 5 oclok
& at 9 AM. being 4 hours we had landed eleven waggon loads
of goods upon the North Shore with the little leather boat &
during the day we got over all the waggons belonging to our
tens being Eleven in all, and all of the rest encampment being
twelve tens ownly got over the same number that we did that
they floated therirs their waggons they floated their waggons
by tying from two to four together but they turned clear over
each other bottom side upwards & back again broke the bows covers
& boxes to pieices & lost ploughs axes & Iron that was left in the
boxes., most of our Company was in the water from morning
to night & all was vary weary when the work was done, we
saw a heavy storm approaching us, we had just drawn Dr Rich[ards]
two waggons to his goods on the shore & loaded them into his
waggons with all speed Just got through as the storm struck
us I sprung into my carriage & tied all down tight but the ra[in]
wind & hail beat upon me so heavy that I had to lay out most of
my strength to hold my waggon cover on both hail & rain came
insid my carriage untill my bed & things were nearly drenched
it ownly lasted 7 minutes but was vary severe most of the wagg-
ons & goods were more or less wet our horses run two or three
miles in the storm when it was over I crossed the river & went
after them, tied them up returned back & went to rest vary
weary, but had some plesant dreams.


~ Tuesday


15th It is vary windy to day & our companies cross the river vary
slow. Another Missouri company has come up with us. I felt
somewhat unwell to day with the exposers of yesterday & the te[eth]
ake


~ Sunday


16th About 20 men went down the river to day & dug out
two large canoes to cover over to make a ferry boat o◊t
to ferry over the large companies of emegrants that have ariv[ed]
& are on the way President Young thought it wisdom to
to leave a number of the brethren here & keep a ferry
untill our companies came up emegrants will pay for ferrying

Page 68

$1.50 cts per waggon pay in flour, at cows, beans &c flour at $2.50 per
cwt cows $10. the brethren also made two new rafts & got quite
a number of our pioneer waggons over. I was quite unwell a part
of the day with ague in the face I walked out however with O Pratt
about 3 miles onto some of the bluffs to view the country we saw
mountains to the North towering into the clouds, we judged they were
not much short of 100 miles from us. we had our guns with us &
hunted some I shot one antelope cut his throat with a bullet &
he fell dead in his tracts. Br Pratt shot at another but did not
get him. this was the first antelope I ever Killed, I tried to back
him in to camp but could not do it well so I got two men to help
me. we had some heavy squals of wind & some rain in the
afternoon. In the evening many of us went over the river to
tie up our horses & when one company was coming back in the
leather boat they filled it half full of water & came near
sinking


~ Thursday


17th Early this morning we swam our horses over the river, one
mule came near drowning by being tangled in a rope but the
curant carried him ashore & he made a live of it, the men
went to work to finish their ferry boat while the men contin
ued to cross waggons on the raft. All of our company got over
to day & the brethren crossed some of the Missourians, Some of the eme
grants report 1000 waggons between Laramie & this place & there compan
ies are ariving daily at the fording places, Brs Young & Kimball got
over to day & we all moved our waggons once more into a circle. this
is the 6th day since our arival to this place which is the longest hender-
ance I ever saw at a ferry or crossing a river. Our brethren run the
the ferry boat all night to cross the Missourians but did not get
over but few waggons. I am still in much pain with the teet[h] ake &
sore lips & mouth. I had the privlege of milking a Mo cow which gave
me a plenty of milk for Supper & breakfast


~ Friday


18th We are still ferrying over the gentiles. Another large company
arived to day. Bro Frosst mad me some nails & set two shoes for me
on my Saddle Horse, we commenced gathering cattle at 10 oclok
& harnessed but did not start at all, but turned our teams
again, as all were not ready. We held a council in the
after noon & resolved to leave 9 men to tend the ferry
to cross emegrant companies & also our brethren who
should come after us, the men were chosen & we
met with them again in the evening, one Brother had petiti-
oned to stay that President Young wished to go along with the com-
pany his name was Glines he did not manifest a good spirit
& Br Young reproved him. He then delivered a short lecture
which was interesting & instructive, and said that when he
gave a man council he did not want him to reject that
council or to bring up many arguments to try to alter it for
when a man did it I will turn on my heel & leave him. He
sayes there is another principle that has tried many in the Church
because more will follow me than some Young Elder who
has not proved himself but if he was to try to gather to
himself the fruits of the labours of the Twelve & other men
would that be right. No he would be pulling back that that
[page covered] [w]as before him but let the Elders do as I have done & my
[page covered] B[r]ethren the Twelve & other faithful men go and preach the
[page covered] [g]ospel for years & do the will of God & you would have a train

Page 69

following you even the fruits of your own labour & you would
be putting them after you, & not drawing back that which is
before you, the Lord is determined to esstablish his kingdom in
the last days & He will have a faithful diligent & obedient people
and He chastizes the Saints to keep them humble & make them do
thereir duty if we had not been mobed & afflicted but always
been in prosperity we should have been lifted up in the pride of
our hearts & not gathered together & built up Zion as we ought to
have done, so that these trials will work together for our good.


Instructions was also given to the Brethren who were to tarry to keep
to gether & be united, divide the means equally among yourselves
according to your labour, let each essteem his brother as himself. In no
wise retain that which belongeth to the traveller, steal not at all, be
careful of the lives & property of those you ferry over, & forget not
your prayers keep together & come up with the next company of Saints


The following are the names Thomas Grover, John S. Higby, Luke Johnson, Wm Empy
Edmond Elsworth, Benjamin F. Stewart, Francis Pomeroy, James Devonport, Appleton
Harmon
. Thomas Grover was appointed captain


~ Saturday


19th we parted with the brethren who were to att
end the ferry & the camp moved on having been
one week we travled through a barren country
to willow springs ^a spring of water^ & nooned being 12 miles, we
past the red butes & many rough picturesque
sceneries & camped at night by the poison waters
travled 9 1/2 miles in the afternoon whole distance 21 1/2


Our camping place for the night was the most wretched of any ground
we have found on the way President Young thought it might properly
be called Hell gate. All the water tasted as though it run through
a bed of salt, salts, saltpeter, sulpher the it was naucious horrible
the ground in the valleys & marshes was apparently one half of it
composed of the saline floresance or salty substance of which this
country abounds. Our horses & cattle being thirsty drank a
little of the watter & quit it some of the cattle got badly miered
in the marshes. The traiders informed us these grounds wers
poison & would kill cattle but ours did not drink much or feed
long we tied them up. The hunters brought in one buffalo &
one deer & 3 antelope


~ Sunday


19 20th Sunday we hitched up early in the morning without feed
or watering & left our encampment of death, poison waters,
salt marshes &c & rode 3 miles to a good camp ground & sweet
water
& turned out & bated 2 hours & took breakfast. this
camp ground was on the willow spring branch about 3 miles from
the head, President Young wished me to go on about 15
miles & look up a camp ground for the night, so I went forw[ar]d
G. A. Smith went with me to the head of the willow springs
we there found a doctor belonging to a Missouri company who
had been doctoring a sick family in a company that was
forward. He was of opinion that the willow springs were
still 10 miles ahead which was incorrect as he was then
sitting at the head of them. Br Smith stoped with the
dDr to wait for our waggons to come up & I rode on alone
After travling several miles Br John Brown came up
with me & we rode on together over a sandy barren, sage
country to a creek of good water containing some small
fish about 10 miles west of the willow springs we arived here

Page 70

at half past 1 oclok we turned out our horses to bait & tarried untill 4 oclok
watching for our company to come in sight, but we could see no
waggons but saw two horsman approaching us, we waved a small
flag for them to come to us supposed they were some of our company, but
they were two hunters Capt Smith & another man from the Mo co
mpany
carrying in buffalo meat to there camp they thought we were
Indians in the distance & made off. I mounted my horse & put after
them & soon overtook them, and made inquiries about our camp
they said they had not seen it, but had seen a company of about
a dozen waggons coming by themselves, I then concluded our camp
had stoped at the willow Springs, so Captain Smith who was the
leader of the Mo Company invited us to go on & camp with them for
the night as they did not expect to go but a few miles further than the
creek we were now on. As it was 5 oclok & we could see 5 miles on
the road back & no waggons in sight I concluded our company would
not come on & if they should they would go no further than the
creek so we accepted Capt Smith proposal & went on with him
to spend the night with his camp dut insted of his going but little
distance he continued on mile after mile & could neither find feed
or water except the salt & alkalie ponds & lakes untill we struck
the sweet water river at Indipendance Rock which is so noted
in Freemonts Journal & other travellers which was about 12 miles west
of the creek before spoken off their oxen had tiered out having
travled about 27 miles & much of the road vary sandy & we had
road about [FIGURE] 30 miles and was quite weary, the sweet water is
truly sweet to man & beast after travling through so
much ground coverd with salt, perlash, and alkilie water as is found
on the way we turned out our horses in good feed got supper which
was bacon, buffalo, corn bread, coffee Milk &c then lay down
upon the ground & spent the night under a tent with the Missour-
ians but did not rest well. I found a great differance between the
Missouri emigrant companies & our own, for while the men, women
& children were all cursing, swaring, quarelling, scolding finding
fault with each other & other companies, there was nothing of the
kind allowed or practiced in our own camp. But to return to
our camp I will say at a late hour they came up to the Creek that
we left back 12 miles, & grass being poor continued on 4 miles
west of the creek & camped for the night they travled 20 miles
while I travled 30 miles. 30 miles


The camp not finding me at the creek nor hearing from me
at all felt some alarmed lest I was lost, or got into trouble with
the Indians or some difficulty they blowed their bugle &
watched for me untill midnight & finally fired there cannon
while I was camped 10 miles from them not thinking that I
was giving them any trouble


~ Monday


21st 1847
June [FIGURE] INDEPENDANCE ROCK I arose early this morning
took breakfast and in
company with Br Brown
we rode clear around Independance Rock I should
judge the distance to be about 3/4 of a mile, we exhamined the many
names & lists of names of the trappers, traders, travellers, & emegrants
which are painted upon those rocks nearly all the names were put
on with read, Black, & yellow paint, some had washed out & defaced
the greatest number was put on within a few Years some of them
were quite plaim of about 30 years standing nearly all the Comp[anies]

Page 71

pass by put some of their names on the rock After going around and
exhaminedng it we staked our horses and mounted the rock I
went forward & gained the highest point of the South end of the
Rock which containes the names. After exhamineing it I then went to
the North end which is the highest part of the rock, here is an opening
or cavern that would contain 30 or 40 persons and a rock stands on the
highest peak of about 3 tons wait. we got upon this rock & offered up
our prayers according to the order of the priesthood, we prayed earnestly
for the blessings of God to rest upon President Young & his brethren
the Twelve & all of the Pioneer Camp & the whole Camp of
Israel
& House of Israel, our wives & children, & relatives
the Mormon Battalion, all the Churches abroad and that the
Lord would hasten the time of the fulfillment of his prom-
ises to Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Lehi, Nephi, Alma, &
Moroni and all the sayings of the Lord of the Lord concerning
the building up of Zions in the last days and avenging the
blood of the Prophets and while offering up our prayers
the spirit of the Lord desended upon us and we truly felt
to rejoice & while we were attending to our prayers the Missou-
rians
was burying a woman a little distance from the
rock by the name of Rachel Morgan 25 years of age being
the third one of the family buried on the road they were
supposed to be poisoned by cooking in new copper vessels
After surveying the rock what we wished we again
desended to the ground. I was the first Latter Day Saint
that ever went onto that Rock or offered up prayers according to the
order of the Priesthood. We had a view of our camp from this rock and
expected they would noon there so we mounted our horses & concluded
to examine the country in the regions round about we rode to the North
East about 5 miles went to the top of a high bluff and saw the camp
in motion we then rode to the foot of the Mountain to the N.W. & followed
under the foot of the mountain all of the way to the Devils gate through
which the Sweet water runs, while taking this circuitous rout
we passed a salt lake covering about 50 acres of Ground, we spent
but few minutes at the Devils gate at this time & hurried on toback to
the Rock as our camp had come up but before we could get to them
they had camped half a mile east of the Rock I met Br Young
going up to the Rock I related to him my travels since I left the camp
He asked me to go back with him to the rock, so I told turned out my
horse having rode all of 20 miles during the forenoon exhamining
bare rugged rocks & barren grounds & salt ponds &c and I returned
with President Young W. Richards G. A. Smith & others & we again
ascended the rock together & spent about half an hour upon it &
returned to camp mounted our horses & rode to the Devils gate which
is the name of the channel through the Mountain through which the
sweet waters run. It is 5 miles from Indipendance Rock &
while approaching this place from the rock as is the case while approa[ch]-
ing the foot of any mountain through this country a person is
greatly decieved in the distance for while An object appears but a mile
ahead of you you will have to ride 5 or 6 before you can reach it
we rode as far as we could into the gate hitched our horses & walked
into about the centre of the cavern. This opening or Devils gate is
400 feet high perpendicular Rocks 120 feet wide & 50 rod's long
& the water rushes through it with a roar, the rocks are compo[se]d
[page worn] [of] coarse grey granite with a vein of black trap rock runing

Page 72

through it we spent about half an hour visiting this place then had to
back out & ride around it on the south side some of the footman
walked over the top of it we camped for the night on the bank of
the sweet water about one mile west of the Devils gate the camp having
travled during the day 15 1/4 miles and I 30 miles. Distance 15 1/4 m 30 miles
A guide board was put up at the gate saying it was
175 1/4 miles from the Fort Laramie, & 50 1/4 from the ford
22nd or ferry of the Platt River


~ Tuesday


22nd we travled 10 miles & nooned. Br Lorenzo Young broke an axeltree
of his waggon which detained the camp some, two more Missouri companies
overtook us at noon, the camp started on & Brs Young, Benson Little
& myself, went back to meet Lorenzo & help him get up his waggon &
we were behind all the afternoon. A company that arived at noon
informed us that a man was drowned at the ferry after we left in
trying to swim his horses across & they had not found his body when
they left, two men also got some alarmed at the Indipendance
Rock
by a large griselly bear they stoped to put their names on the
Rock & the company left them they started to follow on, one man
was on foot & the other on a horse & were met in the road by a griselly
bear who made a tract 10 inch long, they had no weapons not even a knife
the Bear sat up & looked at them a few moments & walked off & they
came along, the griselly bear are more apt to attact men than any other
kind.


We travled in the afternoon 10 3/4 miles & camped at the foot of
a mound about 200 feet high, on the bank of the Sweat water
Br Kimball & mysel went to the top of it & looked down upon the
camp & it look heavenly. we offered up our prayers & the spirit of the
Lord rested upon us we descended again to the camp the moon shone
beautiful. during the evening the brethren put in a new axeltree into
Br Lorenzo' waggon. distance of the day 20 3/4 miles


~ Wednesday


23rd We travled in the forenoon 8 1/2 miles & nooned by the Sweet water
with the mountains piled up near by us our road to day has been
through a level, sandy, barren sage region for a mountain country
we travled in the afternoon 8 1/2 miles & camped on the bank of the Sweetwater
whare the road leaves it for about 20 miles across the sandy sage plains
without water or feed, we had excellent grass for our camp at night
we are in plain view of the Rocky Mountains at the pass & beyound
we had a vary sandy draging road all day whole distance 17 miles


~ Thursday


24th We travled to day 5 miles & came to the frozen or Lee spring
and stoped and exhamined it & found the spring to be strongly impregnated
with sulpher so much so it could not be drank the water would boil up
out of a peace of bog ground yet all around it it was so cold that after
removing the turf about 6 inch a solid body of Ice was found about 18 inches
thick some of it we cut up with axes & spades. near this was small ponds
[page covered] [of] water salt & saltpeter & sulpher & peotash seemed to be in the body of
the water, pure perlash was found in such quantities on the edges of
these waters that the brethren gatherd pailfulls of it [to] raise bread with
others would fill their cups with salt so pure from other mixtures that
they used it we travled from this place 12 3/4 miles & camped upon the
bank of the Sweet water two days 18 miles from the foot of the pass
[page covered] [3] companies camped near us to night, this is the last time we shall see
the sweet water on this journey we did not bait to day but camped
at 4 oclok whole distance of the day 17 3/4 miles


Br Youngs team run away with a waggon I cought them by the
bit just as they were about to plunge into the stream

Page 73

Soon after we camped Br Holman was driving up the horses
with his gon in his hand. He went to punch a horse with the
musel of his gun the lock caught in his cloths & discharged
into the best horse the best horse there was in camp owned by
president Young called his John Horse. He lived a few hours
& died there are many accidents happen in that way by
caring loaded guns with caps upon their tubes.


~ Friday


25th we travled 8 3/4 miles & nooned upon a branch of
the sweet water in as good grass as we have had on
the way early in the afternoo we began to ascend the high
est & longest hill that we have passed over on the jou[r]ney
we travled about 5 miles before [we] reached the top on the
way up the brethren found snow banks 20 or 30 rods
long from 5 to 10 feet deep about 1/4 of a mile from
the road they brought some to me & I ate some
the road was vary rocky a part of the way over the
hills. we passed by 3 Mo camps who had passed by
us we travled in the afternoon 11 1/2 miles & camped
for the night on a small branch of the sweet water
the chain of the wind River mountain seemed
quite near us & covered with vast quantities of
snow & we are so near the top of the mountain
& surrounded with snow that the air feels like
winter whole distance of the day 20 1/4 mi
our teams fed upon white clover to night we are
nearly at the head of the sweet water


~ Saturday


26th We started this morning at 8 oclok & travled untill 1 ocl[ock]
& nooned again on the branch of the Sweet much larger tha[n]
original stream in consequence of the melting of the vast bod[y]
of snow on the wind river range, & the hills that surround us
the watter run into many of our waggons; whare we camped
at noon there was a large quantity of strabury vines in bloo[m]
& white clover we travled in the forenoon 11 miles & in the
afternoon 7 3/4 miles & camped again upon the branch of the
sweet water that we nooned upon, we camped opposit the
table rock & near the summit of the South pass or dividing
ridge
and I was quite asstonished at the road & country
to day considering that we were crossing what is called the
south pass of the rocky mountains it was the best road we
had for many days & had it not have been for the wind
river range of mountains full in view on our right & the
tabl coverd with eternal snow, & some snow banks 10 fe[et]
deep by the side of the road as we passed along & the table
rock on the left I should have thought myself travel[in]g
over the beautiful prairies of Illinois & Missouri except the
country was coverd with more sage that prairie grass
the road for many miles & also the valley of or plain of
beautiful grass lying North of table rock was perfectly
strewn with vary handsom cornelian stones I saw
more in one hour this evening than I ever saw during
my whole life either in the rude state or polished
& set in breast pins in all the jewellers shops I ever saw
in my travels in the world from the sice of a goose
egg to a pea. distance of the day 18 3/4.

Page 74

Elders Kimball Pratt G. A. Smith & Brown continued on to take an
observation with the Barrometer on the dividing ridge & they con-
tinued on to the waters of the green river 7 miles from us that
run into the pacific while we were on the Sweet water that runs
into [t]he Atlantic; they supposed we should come on to them and
as they did not return several of us mounted our horses to go in
search of them soon after we started we met Br Kimball
on his return after us. He informed us that the Brethren
were camped with about one dozen men from Oregon on
there way to the States & they would stay together over night
[FIGURE]


During our travels to day I walked most of the way with Profess-
ors Pratt, & Carrington and our conversation turned upon the
subject of the original formation of God, Angels, men, & Devils
the begetting of Spirits in the eternal world, & who by, the beget-
ing of children on the earth, the Death of men & children & the
resurrection of all. Each one gave his views, opinions, & reasonings
& many interesting remarks were truly made. And any person
who should chance to read these lines I wish them to understand that
the Ideas given upon these points were not given as doctrin but opi-
nion untill sumthing better should present itself or be decided by
revelation. One of the most important Items If true was pre-
sented by Professor Pratt upon a subject that heretofore has ben
entirely out of the reach of all mankind from the days of Adam
to the present time as far as is revealed to us. It was upon the subjec
of the original formation of the first God, we all admitted in the
first place that which we believed to be an important truth ie the eternal
duration of matter spirit, intelligence in some form or other we also
agreeed in the opinion that Neither God nor man always had from
all eternity the same formation that they now have but did exhist in
some form for if we admitted the fact that one being exhisted in
the present form all might have exhisted in the same form as well as
one, then the question arose how did God recieve his present formation
the answer given by Professor Pratt was sumthing in the following
language. He sayes I t[h]row out my Ideas not as doctrin but for you
to look at. you know when a Chemist goes to work to analize or
try new experiments they often have to try many times before they
get a thing perfect & take certain processes which are unnecessary and are
afterward laid aside and pursue the most perfect course that can be
obtained. It may reasonably have been the case with the first being
formed which may be called God. As eternity was filled as it were
with particles of intelligence who had there agency, two of these
particles in process of time might have joined their interest together
exchanged ideas & found by persueing this course that they gained
double strength to what one particle of intelligence would have &
afterwards were joined by other particles & continued untill they
formed a combination or body though through a long process yet
they had power over other intelligences in consequence of their
combination, organization, & strength and in process of time this
being body or God seeing the advantage of such an organization
desires company or a companion and having some experiance
goes to work & organizes other beings by prevailing intelligences to
come togeth & may form sumthing better than at the first
and after trials of this kind & the moust perfect way sought
ought it was found to be the most expeditious & best way to recieve
there formations or bodies either spiritual or temporal through
the womb

Page 75

~ Sunday


June 27th 1847 Three years ago this day the Prophets Joseph
and Hyrum Smith were martered.


Though it was
Sunday morning we harnessed up our teams & drove 6 miles to
the place whare Brs Pratt & Smith camped in company with
Mr Harris who has been a traider & trapper in the rocky mou-
ntains
& travled through Oregon & Calafornie 25 years we found
him to be a man of much experience & knowledge & acquaintan[ce]
with the Country. He brought a file of Oregon Papers & one
Published by S Brannon of Calafornia many of us had
much conversation with him about the Country He spoke
unfavorable of the Salt Lake Country for a settlement but
spoke of other places not far off that were good. He said we
generally could go through the pass as late as November
but should we get blocked in with snow we would would
find a small stream of water 4 or 5 miles from the Devils
gate
near Independance rock this stream is 5 miles west of
the gate follow that up a short distance & it would lead
to a road that crosses it to the west which would lead to a
through a large plain following to the mountains whare
there is but little snow when you come to the pass or
hill get onto some of them & you will see a large
bute leave it to the [blank] hand & follow down [blank]
And it will lead into the open
valleys see * below


It is 275 1/2 miles from fort Laramie to the South pass


At 9 oclok this morning I passed the dividing ridge
that seperates the dividing waters of the Atlantic
and pacific we camped at noon on muddy creek
the waters of which run into the green river & the
pacific I drank its waters for the first time in my
life that I tasted of waters runing into the pacific
we had a warm dusty day I conversed considerably
with Mr Harris about the country we camped at
night upon dry sandy whole distance 15 1/4 mil


* 3 miles above the gate look to the South you will see an open pass in
the Mountains go through that & let your Course be west till you top
the hill out of the great plain, then look to the south you will see a
square bute leave that to the left go on & cross the green River then let
your course be west to Bridgers Fort, (And I think) he said we should
go by blacks fork


~ Monday


28th we parted with Major Harris after doing some traiding with
him He promised to meet us again on bear River, we travled to
little Sanday & nooned the stream was high, in the afternoon
we travled 2 miles & met Mr Bridger of the fort on the way
with two other men going to fort Laramie. He was expecting us & was
to have an interview with President Young & the Twelve and also we
wished to have an interview with thehim. So we immediately turned
onto the creek we nooned on & camped for the night & Mr
Bridger & his men camped with us, we met in council & spent
some hours in conversations, we found him to have been a great
traveller and a great knowledge of nearly all Oregon & Calafor[nia]
the Mountains, lakes, Rivers, Brooks, springs, valleys, mines, ores, &c &
ie if what he told us was true. He knew of gold, silver, copper, lead, coal
Iron, Sulpher & Salpeter, mines. He spoke more highly of the great

Page 76

[page covered] [Basin] for a settlement than Major Harris did, that it was his [page torn]
& if this people settled in it he wanted to settle with them, there [page torn]
but one thing that could operate against it becoming a great gra[in] [page torn]
country & that would be frost. He did not know but the frost would
effect the corn. He said there was a spring at the end of the Salt lake
that produced both hot & cold fresh water, & hot & cold salt water
out of the same hole or spring, & formed a large body of verdegreece [verdigris]
below which the Indians get to paint skins, arrors &c. He informed
us whare to find a mine of silver & lead ore on big timber Creek we
conversed about a great variety of things. He said he was ashamed of
the Maps of Freemont for he knew nothing about the country
ownly the plain travled road, that he could correct all the maps that
had been put out about the western world. He said if we wanted
any of his services to let him know, the American fir Company had
paid him $2000 dollars per year while in their employ. He spent the
time conversing untill 10 oclok, we then retired to bed several of
the brethren bought dressed deer skin shirts & pants of [him] then they
would swap an outside dress for one Hickory or Checked shirt.
We had good grass & water & plenty of musketoes to night dis 15 1/2


~ Tuesday


29th we parted this morning with Mr Bridger who remarked that
it would not be prudent to bring a great population into the
bason untill we ascertained whether grain would grow or not
we travled on to big Sandy 8 miles & nooned it was a vary hot
day, these streams are now up but during Summer they become
entirely dry, we nooned two hours & then drove onto the bank
of the Big Sandy 15 3/4 miles & camped for the night this campground
is the last time we meet with Big Sandy 8 miles east of the ferry
on green River the road to day, as has been the case through a
great portion of this country has been over a hot sandy desert with
scearsly any green thing except the various species of the wild sage
from 6 inches to 8 feet high with stocks from 1/4 of an inch to 4 inches
in diameter we have to use it for firewood & it makes quite a good
substitute. O. P. Rockwell & myself went forward to pick out a camp
ground we was ahead about 6 miles of the camp when we found
one which was the first place we could get grass for 15 miles
from whare we nooned, it made the longest days journey
we had made on the whole route. I returned to meet the c[amp] [page covered]
about 4 miles & was informed that Br Fowler was vary sick
& in my carriage I went back & met him & found him in great
distress in his head, back, & bones through out. He complained bitt
rly of the jar of the waggon. And finally was out of his head &
became wild. I did not get into camp untill near 9 oclok, I then
commenced doctoring him with composition, tea, pills &c & he
soon began to get better & had a comfortable nights rest distance of the day 23 3/4


~ Wednesday


30th Br Fowler was some better this morning seemed to be threatned
with the ague kept his bed & rode in the waggon, we travled
8 miles & camped upon the bank of the green river at the ferry & the
afternoon was spent in building a raft as the river was high it
could not be crossed ownly upon rafts or boats. It was 235 1/2 miles
from the fort Laramie to the South pass of the rocky mountains


During the afternoon the arival of Elder Samuel S Brannan from
the bay of San Francisco was anounced in camp, we were truly glad [to] [page covered]
meet with him that we might hear from him & the Saints who w[ere] [page covered]
with him. He gave us an account of there landing their travels & t[he] [page covered]
present settlement which was 200 miles up the river from the b[ay] [page covered]

Page 77

[page torn] [The]y were putting in wheat & preparing for us He had come all
[page torn] [the] way with ownly two men to meet with us. the Saints were
[page torn] [se]ttelled with & the Mormon Battalion was 400 miles from him
[page torn] [H]e said Br Pratt was doing well. The inhabitants of one whole Island
numbering 3000 had imbraced the faith he told us many inter-
esting thigs & we were truly glad to see him distance of the day 8 m


~ Thursday


JULY 1st We tried this morning to swim our cattle over the
river but had great difficulty in it. About 15 persons have been
taken sick within a few days with fever ague &c which is said to
be common to emegrants coming from the snowy mountains to the
plains or valleys whare it is hot wether, Br Fowler is better to
day some others of the sick are better some are worse. each
division made a good raft yesterday & are lanched this morning
Brother Brannon brought a file of his papers that he is publishing
with him to camp & a letter to Br Fowler from his wife. He also
informed us that Captain Sutter was vary friendly & wished us
to come & settel near him. He informed us that he saw more
timber on green River whare we now are than he had seen on
his route since he left Calafornia He came through a par[t] of
Oregon. We are now in Calafornia. We got over 10 waggons to day
among others my own so we camped over night on the south
bank of the green river


~ Friday


2nd Two rafts have been runing through the day & most of
the waggons have been brought over we swam our horses &
cattle over this morning though with some difficulty, we
held a council in the afternoon with the Twelve &
4 men was appointed to return to meet the camp & pilo[te]
them up, Br Brannan was with the council, we each one
wrote our views concerning the council to be given to the camp
it is an exceding hot day, and both man & beast are much annoyed
with musketoes. Several salmon trout were caught at the mouth of
a slue on green river near the ferry one weighing 7 1/4 lbs. Several
of the brethren gathered a quantity of salaratus from the salarat[us]
bedes about 3 miles east of the indipendance rock near the road &
thought it answered as good a purpose as the manufactured article
for raising bread & family purposes


~ Saturday


3rd A light sprinkle of rain, cool, cloudy & high winds, so they could
not finish ferrying, the pilots are preparing to start back to meet the
companies I wrote a letter by them to Aphek Woodruff A O. Sm[oot]
[FIGURE] and John Benbow, the wind laid & we finished ferrying in the
evening & the whole camp moved 3 miles & camped A guide board
was put up a mile from the ferry saying [FIGURE] 340 mile from
Fort Laramie


~ Sunday


Sunday Independance July 4th 1847 A meeting was held
last evening & the 4 men were appointed as pilots to go back
& meet the company were called upon to start this morning
to go on their journey. I accompanied Presidents Young
Kimball Richards & others to the ferry to put them across
[page torn] [t]he river & when we arived at the river we saw 13 horsman
[page torn] [o]n the opposite bank, with therir baggage on one of our rafts
[page torn] [B]ut to our great joy who should they be bout our Brethren
[page torn] [b]elonging to the Mormon Battalion who volunteered into the
[page torn] [se]rvice of the U.S.A. one year ago this month & belonged to Capt

Page 78

Browns Detachment who had been at Pueblo through the winter
Br A Lyman who we sent unto them had reached them & infor-
med them whare we are & the whole detachment of 140 of the
brethren were within 7 days drive of us, we drew up the
raft & crossed them all over but one who returned with our
pilots to meet the companies when we met it was truly a harty
greeting & shaking of hands. they accompanied us into camp and all
were glad to meet, this small detachment had come on to m
meet some hors thieves who had stolen about a dozen horses from
them they had overtaken them & got all but one He had gone
on to Bridgers fort & they calculated to follow him & get their
horse they spent the night in camp with us, among the names
of those who died was Mervin Blanchard who drove team for
me last summer. But I must stop writing the Musketoes have filled
my carriage like a cloud and have fallen upon me as though they intende
to devour me. I never saw that insect more troublesome than in certain places
in this country several traiders passed by our camp just at night


~ Monday


5th we left the green river (which are the head waters of the
Coloradoe,) & drove 20 miles & camped on blacks fork there is neit[h]-
er food or water since we left the green river to this place but is
similar to the last 200 miles. A sandy desert coverd with sage, but we
find good grass on the Streams. most of the day was vary hot
& dusty yet towards night we saw a hard shower of rain some
wind towards the mountains a few drops reached us in this coun-
try it rains about the mountains but not much in the valleys &
plains. distance of the day 20 miles


~ Tuesday


6th A warm windy dusty day, man & beast harnesses & waggons were
all coverd with dust we crossed black fork at 9 oclok, muddy fork at
10 & camped on the west side of Hams fork at 5 oclok we did not
noon at all today whole distanc of the day 18 miles


The sick in camp are most universally getting better, the face of the
country is the same to day as usual barren, sand & sage, with occasionally
a sprinkling of flowers some vary beautiful, the country during the last
weeks drive has appeared vary destitute of game none to be seen except
occasionally an antilope one was killed yesterday


~ Wednesday


7th We crossed hams fork and drove to Fort Bridger & in the regi
on of the fort before we got onto our camping ground we crossed
more than a dozen trout brooks, the water run swift but clear, hard,
cold, gravelly, bottoms. the brethren cought several brook trout the
first I had seen since I left England the whole region of country
all up & down these streams were covered with grass knee deep, 10
of the battalion found a hors thief at the fort who had assisted in
stealing 10 of their horses they had got all but two, & the man said
they had gone to Oregon. we saw about a dozen traiders lodges about
the fort the fort was merly a small traiding post ore one duilding
not large distance of the day 17 3/4 miles


~ Thursday


8th [FIGURE] The calculation was to spend the day at the fort, as soon as I
got my breakfast I riged up my trout rod that I had brought with me
from Liverpool, fixed my reel, line, & artificial fly & went to one
of the brooks close by camp to try my luck cetching trout, the men
[page covered] [a]t the fort said there were but vary few trout in the streams, and
[page covered] [a] good many of the brethren were already at the creeks with their rods
[page covered] [&] lines triying their skill baiting with fresh meat & grass hoppers, but
no one seemed to ketch any, I went & flung my fly onto the wat[er]

Page 79

And it being the first time that I ever tried the artificial fly in
America or ever saw it tried, I watched it as it floated upon the
water with as much intens interest as Franklin did his kite when
he tried to draw lightnigng from the skies. And as Franklin recieved great
Joy when he saw electricity or lightning descend on his kite string in
like manner was I highly gratifyed when I saw the nimble trout
dart my fly hook himself & run away with the line but I soon
worried him out & drew him to shore & I fished two or three
hours includind morning & evening & I caught twelve in all
and about one half of them would weigh abought 3/4 of a pound each
while all the rest of the camp did not ketch during the day
3 lbs of trought trout in all which was proof potsitive to me
that the artificial fly is far the best thing now known to fish
trout with. In the afternoon I went to Bridgers House & traid[ed] [page covered]
off my flint lock rifle for four buffalo robes the robes were
large & nice well tan[n]ed or dressed. He called the gun $20 & the
robes $5 each, the articles generally at Bridgers fort were at least
one third or one half higher, than at any other traiding post in
America that I ever saw. His robes were $5 buck skin shirts $6
pants $6 dressed skins $3 &c while at fort hall, doe skins 50 ct
Buck 75 Elk $1 Shirts & Pants $1.50, Robes $2, &c


Professor Pratt took observations at fort Bridger in Lat. 41º 19' 13"
Highth above the sea 6665 feet


~ Friday


9th I arose this morning quite unwell, felt threatend with
the camp fever, yet I mounted my horse and rode untill 10 oclok before
starting however I was called upon to administer to Br Carter who
was taken with the fever there are new cases evry day in camp. I
took to my bed at 10 oclok with distressing pain in my head, back, joints
bones, marrow, & all through the system attended with cold chills &
hot flashes through the body, and we travled 13 miles over as bad a road as
we had had on the journey, which makes it exceding painful to the sick, the
day seemed excedind long to me when we stoped at night I took composi
tion, cayenne and a dose of vegitable pills and I had a better nights
rest than I expected distance of the day 13.


~ Saturday


10th I felt quite feeble this morning but felt that my fever was broke
we travled up & down some of the steepest hills we have found on the
journey & the longest, we passed through a valley 6 ", miles long grass knee
deep strong mineral springs, any amount of copper, lead, & coal, & lime &
great stone on each side of the valley it is an 18 mile drive without water
that can be drank there are a number of springs in the valley but
they run through mineral beds and are not good to drink, we camped
for the night 1 1/2 miles from bear River. by the best spring of water
we had found on the route & a small stream near by. An Indian
came from Bridgers fort & travled with us & camped with us for the
night, camp fires were discovered about 3 miles from our camp G.A.S
& others went over to them, and found it to be Mr Miles Goodyier
& several others with him some were from Calafornia going ba[c]k
to the States. Mr Goodyier goes by the name of Miles though it is
his Christian name he has setled at the Salt lake has a garding &
vegitation of all kinds he says doing well. He spoke of 3 rods
to the Lake, & talked about the country the Missourian that wa[s]
going to the States came through the 80 miles drive without wate[r]
or grass had to leave 5 of his mules on the road could not get
[page covered] [his] own through, this is on the Calafornia road. The subject a

Page 80

was brought up again concerning the emigrant company who pe[rished] [page covered]
in the Mountains last winter they were mostly from Independance
Clay County Missouri and were a mob company & threatned to drive
out the mormons that were in Calafornia & started for Calafornia with
that spirit in there hearts but it seemed as though they were ripe for
judgement the snows fell upon them 18 feet deep on a level & they
died & eat up each other about 40 persons perished & were mostly
eat up by those who survived them Mrs L Murphy of Tenn whom
I baptized while on a mishion in that Country but since apostitized
& joined the mob was in the company, died or was killed & eat up
her bones sawed to peaces for her branes & marrow & left strewed
upon the ground


distance of the day 18 miles
whole distance from Bridgers fort to Bear River 32 1/2 miles


Br Luce was taken vary sick this afternoon there are new cases daily
It is vary severe but does not generalal last the brethren more than 2 or
3 days.


Three griselly bear were seen by the brethren to day some
were within a few rods of them dut they made of & did not give
battle which they are more apt to do than any other bear


~ Sunday


11th Sunday we spent the day in camp some of the brethren rode
out to seek out the road & found a mineral tar spring it run
pure tar or substance that looked like tar quite as thick
& black. some thought it was oil it had a strong smell
& was 1 1/2 miles south of our camp several of the brethren
thought of getting it to tar waggons with


~ Monday


12th [FIGURE] I started early in the morning & rode to bear
River
and for the first time I saw the long looked
for Bear River valley yet the spot whare we stuck it
was nothing vary interesting there was considerable
grass in the valley & some timber & thick bushes on
the bank of the river my object in visiting the
river before the camp was to try my luck in ketching
trout as it was a stream famed for containing that
kind of fish it was cloudy & cool but I found
it a difficult stream to fish in with the fly in
consequence of the thick underbrush I fished several
hours & had all sorts of luck good bad and i
indiferent I some of the time would fish half an
hour & could not start a fish, then I would find an
eddy with 3 or 4 trout in it & they would jump at
the hooks as though there was a bushel of trout in
the hole, and in one instance I caught two at a time
I fished some of the time on horsback riding in the
middle of the stream which was about 3 rode wide
& when I could not desend longer in the stream
for swift & deep water I would have to plunge
my horse through the bear thickets which was
hard work to penetrate and I knew not at
what moment I would have a griselly bear upon
my back or an Indian arrow in my side
for I was in danger of both some of the time
I would have a dozen bites at my hook in one
& nearly drown 3 or 4 trout & not get one. I fin[ally] [page covered]
wound up my fishing & started after the camp

Page 81

Having caught [ink blot] troot in all the camp travled
9 miles & nooned in a valley I found President
Young vary sick with the fever. The camp started on
But President Young being so sick concluded not to move from whare
He was Brs Kimball, Benson, Rockwood & others stoped with him with
there waggons, we drove without any road over Hills & dales had to
make our own road as we went along, we camped at night in Mathews
valley by the side of Reddings Cave, this cave is about 20 feet wide
at its mouth 7 feet high & 30 feet long, at the back part of the cave
Are large wolf dens or other Animals the cave is composed of
light coulored sand stone vary somft many of us cut our name
in it there are many curious rocks that surround it we passed
by A mountain of pudding stone composed of gravel sand
sement &c its spires were reaching up like the pyramids of Egypt
The valleys begin to grow more fertile & the Air more pacific than in
the wind River country. Professor Pratt informed me that his
Barometrical [FIGURE] observation made the south pass to be 7085 feet
above the level of the sea. Also it was 280 miles from Laramie
the distance of the day 16 3/4 mile


~ Tuesday


13th I arose quite unwell this morning sore throat, mouth, lips &c
several Brethren went to meet President Young the camp lay
still waiting for him to come up, Br Kimball came to camp at noon
And A council was called of the whole camp & Resolved that
O Pratt take A company of about 20 waggons & 40 men & go
on to the canion make the rode as they go & if they could not
go through the canion to find Smiths cut off & make a road over
the mountain that we need not be hindred when we come along
there was 23 waggons in all & started At 1 oclok. the Hunters
brought in 12 Antelope ^yesterday^ & to day 10 we have found but little game
for many days untill yesterday & to day. President Young is
better to day but will not move untill tomorrow. In the Afternoo[n]
Elder Richards & myself walked out to search for springs or
water & talked over old times my mishion to Fox Islands
And his labours in Preston & our mishions in England together


~ Wednesday


14th I Rode in the fore part of the day back back 7 miles to visit Br Young
Dr Richards G. A. Smith the evening before went out together & Pray
before the Lord for the Recovery of Br Young & we felt a testimony
that thatHe would begin to recover from that hour. And when I
Arived whare he was I found him much better in health & quite
chearful, But I found Br Rockwood much the sickest man that
had been in camp I tarried with them untill near night Assisting
the sick & then returned back to our encampment travled 14 mil
during the evening we also went out & Prayed for Br Rockwood
& felt convinced we should find him better in the morning


~ Thursday


[page covered] [l]5th I started early in the morning with my carriage & H[orses] [page torn]
[page covered] after President Young & Br Rockwood I was two hours [driving] [page torn]
7 miles to their camp made up the bed in the waggon & took
them both in I found them much better in health & t[hey] [page torn]
thought they could ride As my carriage was the easiest veicle [in] [page torn]
camp so all the waggons started & drove to our camp & the sick were
refreshed by their ride And After making A short halt the whole [camp] [page torn]
drove 4 1/2 miles further & ca[mped for the] night I drove 18 1/2 m and cam[ped] [page torn]

Page 82

~ Friday


16th I took Brs Young & Rockwood into my carriage & drove on
with the camp 6 1/2 miles & nooned in the same valley which we nam
ed Mathews vale we travled in the Afternoon 9 1/2 miles with per-
pendicular Rocks on one side & steep Bluffs on the other thousands
of feet high we had a bad road for the sick to travel in &
wearied Br Young out & He was sick at night. for several mil[es]
on the North side of the Road we discoverd A dark substance
Runing out of the holes of the Rocks which congeled it had
some the Appearance of gum myrr or opeum ownly it was
hard & bitter As Allows we could could discover it for
10 miles ain places along on the rocks distance of the day 16 m
I went to webers fork 1 miles from our encampment & coug[ht]
one trout for Br Young


~ Saturday


17th Br Young is vary poorly this morning. 9 of our horses lost
among whom is two that Br Fowler drives, we start out
& drive 3 miles on webers fork & camp A number of trout was
caught by the Brethren some that would weigh A lb Br Young
was wors & could not Journey & we stoped & camped for
the day the Horses were found 10 miles back. I fished with the
fly & cought several trout. The Twelve with somo others went out
together & prayed in due form for Br Young & all the sick & had a
good time. distance 3 miles
we rode to the canion in the night 8 miles whole distance 16


~ Sunday


^18th Sunday spent the day Holding meeting^
198th 41 waggons went on this morning among whom was Dr
Richards & G. A. Smith 15 waggons remained with President Young
Among the number was two of my own. In company with
H C Kimball E T Benson, & H Egan I rode over the mountain
called Pratts Pass with the company that went on & returned
to camp it was A Hot day. several Brethren cought some trout
t[h]at would weigh near two lbs each I cought 2 with the fly but
t[h]ey did not seem to take it well in that stream, we moved
our camp 2 miles 2 miles
whole distance that I travled during the day 25 miles


during the evening I went onto A High hill with Brothers Kimball
& Benson & had prayers together & A good time conversed much
upon the things of the Kingdom of God


~ Monday


2019th we started early in the morning & rode with the Presid-
ent 5 miles & stoped & took Breakfast Br Youngs fever is
still on him but He stood the mornings ride well I carry
him in my carriage. we are now travelling through Pratts
Pass
to avoid the canion, we travled After the mornings Halt
10 miles over the worst road we have had on the Journey the who[le]
distance of the day was 15 miles


~ Tuesday


we camped at night on A trout creek about 10 feet across
it we found 3 waggons that had stoped on this creek in consequence
of t[h]e sick. Brs. Sherwood Johnson & Dewey were so sick they
could not Journey & we camped on the same ground with them
Sherwood & Johnson were Baptized for their sickness & I confir[med]
them. Br Young stood the Journey well considering the hard road
He was quite weary come night. Several of the Brethren caught
some small trout in the streame we camped on Br Fowler dished
some o[f] his waggon wheels, & G A. Smith who was in the company [page covered]
[page covered] dis[he]d two of his stoped & burned coal & set the tyre. This mo[rning] [page covered]
Br [Pr]att [page torn] & company was ownly 8 miles ahead of whare we ca[mped] [page covered]

Page 83

~ Wednesday


201st we set the tire on one wheel of Fowlers waggon we remain
in camp to day in consequence of sickness, Brs Kimball, Benson &
Lorenzo Young went through the canion of Ogdens fork which is [the]
name of the creek we camped on, the rout we are taking is Reeds
Pass
which we have named Pratts Pass in consequence of his going
on to make the road. It is A Hot day, the report is we have a
rougher road on ahead than any thing we have met with, the country
is vary mountaineous rough & steep many of the springs we meet
with on the way are saltish or mineral. The stream we are on [is] [page covered]
Ogdens fork. In the afternoon I waided the creek two miles & fished
with the fly down to the mouth of the canion I cought 8 trout
there is none vaury large in this part of the stream 1/4 of a lb was as
large as we caught


~ Thursday


22nd we travled 8 miles to day on Ogdens fork ^webber river East Canyon Creek^ & camped on the creek
whare the Pratts Pass leaves the fork for good & turnes to the west
we crossed the creek eleven times in going 8 miles & the worst
8 miles we have had on the journey. Br Case smashed one of his hind
waggon wheels to peaces, & we had to wait 2 hours to bring his wag
gon up & continued the Journey drawing the exeltree on a pole I
caught 2 trout in the creek while waiting, the sick stood the
Journey better than we expected considering the road


~ Friday


23rd We Left Ogdens fork ^webber river East Canyon Creek^ & travled to the west 5 miles up
Hill an exceding hard hill to clime, 5 miles brought us to the sum
mit of the Hill we then descended the Hill 6 miles through
a thick timberd grove of Aspen & spruice Balsom &c the tim[ber]
had been cut out out of the road yet it was full of stumps
& it kept evry teamster vary busy to dodge the stumps &
not break his waggon. One man turned over his ox waggon
& smashed the top all to a reck there was two children
in the waggon but they were not Hurt. the last 6 miles was
as bad as any thing we had found. Having travled 5 miles
up hill & 6 down total 11 miles we nooned by A splendid spring
in A small Birch grove, we saw more timber during this half
days travel thain we had seen in a month, & the valley both
ascending & descending was extremely fertile & coverd with
vegitation even to the top of the Hills. At the spring whare [we] [page covered]
nooned we were met by Brothers Pack & Mathews from
the forward camps they brought A letter to us, & informed
us it was ownly 10 miles to the valley of the Salt Lak[e]
or great basan & 14 to their camp they had explored
the country as far as possible & had made choice of a spot
to put in seeds they considered it the greatest grea[z]ing [page torn]
country in the world but was destitute of timber as [far] [page torn]
as they had been, several fine streams of fresh wa[ter] [page torn]
putting through the valley. After nooning we travled [up] [page torn]
another vary tedious Hill & down it into a valley [&] [page torn]
camped for the night, with Hills miles high on [each] [page torn]
side of us I clumbed to the top of one hill over 2 m[iles] [page torn]
High was in a high state of perspiration when I [reached] [page torn]
the top of it. whole distance of the day 15 m


[bottom of page blank]
Page 84

~ Saturday


[FIGURE] JULY 24th 1847
This is an important day in the
History of my life and the History of the
Church of JESUS CHRIST of Latter Day
Saints. On this important day after trav[eling]
from our encampment 6 miles through the
deep ravene, valley, ending with the canion
through last creek we came in full view
of the great valley or Bason [of] the Salt Lake
and land of promise held in reserve by the hand of GOD for a rest-
ing place for the Saints upon which A portion of the Zion of
GOD will be built. we gazed with wonder and admiration upon
the vast rich fertile valley which lay for about 25 miles in
length & 16 miles in wedth clothed with the Heaviest garb of
of green vegitation in the midst of which lay a large lake of
salt water of [blank] miles in extent in which could be seen
large Islands & mountains towering towards the clouds also the
glorious valley abounding with the best fresh water springs
rivlets creeks & Brooks & Rivers of various sizes all of which
gave animation to the sporting trout & other fish while the
waters were wending there way into the great salt lake; our
hearts were surely made glad after A Hard Journey from
Winter Quarters of 1200 miles through flats of Platt Rivers
& steeps of the Black Hills & the Rocky mountains And burni
ng sands of the eternal sage regions & willow swails & Rocky
canions & stubs & stones, to gaze upon A valley of such vast
extent entirely surrounded with a perfect chain of everlasting
hills & mountains coverd with eternal snow with there
innumerale peaks like pyramids towering towards Heaven presen
ting at one view the grandest & most sublime scenery probably that
could be obtained on the globe. Thoughts of pleasing meditations
ran in rapid succession through our minds while we contemplated
that not many years that the House of GOD would stand upon
the top of the Mountains while the valleys would be converted into
orchard, vineyard, gardings & fields by the inhabitants of Zion &
the standard be unfurled for the nations to gather there to
President Young expressed his full satisfaction in the Appearanc
of the valley as A resting place for the Saints & was Amply
repayed for his journey.


After gazing awhile upon the scenery
we travled across the table land into the valley 4 miles to the
encampment of our Brethren who had arived 2 days before
us, they had pitched there encampment upon the bank of two
small streams of pure water & had commenced plowing
had broke about 5 acres of ground & commenced planting
potatoes. As soon As we were formed in the encampment
before I took my dinner having 1/2 a bushel of potatoes I repai
red to the ploughed field & planted my potatoes Hop^e^ing wi[th] [page torn]
the blessings of God at least to save the seed for another
year. The Brethren had damed up one of the creeks & dug
A trench & by night nearly the whole ground was Irrigated
with water we found the ground vary dry. towards evening
In company with Brs. Kimball Smith & Benson I rode several
miles up the creek into the mountain to look for timber in
the country &c there was A thunder shower & it rained near
ly over the whole ^valley^ & also it rained some the fore part of the
night we felt thankful for this As it was the general corect
opinion th[at it] [page torn] did not rain in the valley during summers distance [page covered]

Page 85

~ Sunday


July 25 Sunday This is the first Sunday that the Latter Day Saints
ever spent in the great bason ^salt Lake valley^. we washed shaved & cleaned up &
met in the circle of the encampment. Meeting was opened by the
bishops & G A Smith preached ^the first sermon while standing upon the cannon^ An interesting discourse & was followed
by H. C. Kimball & E. T. Benson all of which spoke unto edifycation
An intimission of 2 Hours met again at 2 oclok the Bishops broak
bread to the congregation. I then Addressed the Brethren was followed
by O Pratt & W Richards all of which expressed the gratitude
of our hearts to our Heavenly Father for leading us to so goodly a land
& exhorted the Brethren to Harken to council do away with selfish-
ness live humble & keep the commandments of God that we may
prosper in the land, several other Brethren also expressed their
feelings & there was one universal feeling of satisfaction thwith the
valley, evry man that spoke upon the subject said they were
Joyfully disappointed that the whole appearance was Altogether
better throughout the valley than they had Anticipated or even
dreamed of. At the close of the meeting President Young though
feble Addressed for A few moments And Informed the brethren
[FIGURE] they must not work on Sunday that they would loose
five times as much as they would gain by it & they
must not hunt or fish on that day And there should not any
man dwell among us who would not observe these roles they might
go & dwell whare they pleased but should not dwell with us
He said that no man should buy any land that come Here that He
had no land to sell neither should He buy any but evry man should [have]
his land measured of[f] to him for city & farming purposes what
He could till & He might till it as he pleased but He should
be industrious & take care of it He also warned the Saints against
keeping any thing that did not belong to them that if they followed
this course it would leek out & they would stink in the norstrils
of Jehovah Angels & the Saints & though they might live with the
Saints & die with theym they would be damned at last & go to
Hell for they were thieves & nothing but burning through Hell
would clens them. He remarked there would be a meeting evry
Sabbath in thatis place or whareever we stop. Council was
also given to tie up our Horses at night


~ Monday


26th Monday The camp in general was busily ingaged in plowing &
planting corn & other seeds. ten men including the Twelve were appo
inted to go on an exploring expedition. I took President Young into
my carriage & travled two miles towards the mount^a^in & made choice of
a spot of ground for our garding with a small rivlet runing throug[h]
it sufficient to irrigate it which I named guarding creek we then
returned to camp & went North of the camp about 5 miles & we all
went unto the top of a high Peak in the edge of the mountain which we
considerd A good place to raise An ensign upon which we named ensign
Peak
or Hill ^I was the first person that Ascended this Hill^ Brother Young was vary weary in climing the Peak He
being feble, we then desended to the flat—started north to visit some
hot sulpher springs but we returned two miles to get A drink of cool
water & then went back 4 miles to the springs we found them vary
warm but not hot, 3 or 4 of the springs ished [issued] green water & formed
substance below that looked like verdigreese. After visiting them we
returned to camp quite weary. Brs Mathews & Brown returned to ca[mp]
had crossed the valley in the Narrowest place opposite the camp to the
mountain on the west found the valley about 2015 miles across passed
over A river 4 miles from camp about 8 rods wide which we saw fr[om]

Page 86

ensign Peak we also had A good view of the salt lake through our glasses
& many rivers & creek runing through the valley the whole distance of the
day was 20 m


~ Tuesday


27th I took President Young in my carriage & started for an explo
ring expedition. Br A Lyman came into camp this morning &
informed us that Browns detachment of the Battalion would
be with us in about 2 days. Br Lyman with all of the twelve
in camp with several other Brethren started with us on our
exploring expedition being 8 of the Twelve & 6 other Brethren
among whom was Br Brannan from Francisco Bay being 14 of
us in all. We started for the purpose of visiting the salt lake & mou
ntain on the west of the valley we travled ^2^ miles west from
the Temple Block & come to the Utah outlet of the Utah lake
we then travled ^14^ miles to the foot of the Bluff or mountain
on the west of the valley whare we found a fountain of fresh
water some brackish the land was not near as fertile on the
west side of the valley as on the east. And lbut little fresh wate[r]
as far as we went while the east side of the valley is as well
wattered as any land I ever saw. we took our dinner at the fresh
water pool & then rode 6 miles to a large rock on the shore of
the Salt lake we here ^we^ made A Halt. And all went into the salt
water & we made up our minds at once that the great salt
lake ought to be added as the eigtht wonder of the world, the
watter was quit warm And was impregnated with as much
salt as could possibly be dissolved in water ist was so strong
that if A particle got into the eyes nose or mouth it would
strangle & put one in pain no person could possibly sink in it
A person would float & rooll on the top of the water like A dry
log & while standing to our waist in water we could not get
our knees to the bottom but would rise to the top like a
cork, we found the most beautiful white salt that I ever saw lying
in bunches on the shore whare the water dryed away, the whole
dBody of the water will make at least 3 pints of the best quality of
white salt to one gallon of water. After spending an hour at this place
we rode south on the lake shore about 4 miles & then returned 10
miles to our place of nooning & camped for the night the whole
distance of the day which I drove my carriage from camp 40 mil


~ Wednesday


28th After having camped all night in the open air we arose refres-
hed by sleep. I having lost my carriage whip the evening before 4 miles
back I started in the morning on Horsback to go back after it, as I
got near the place I discoverd two objects appear on A ridge before me
About 1/2 a mile distant I at first took them to be bears but after approac[h]
ing a little nearer I discoverd about 20 objects appearing over the Hill I
soon saw that they were Indians And as I was unarmed & over 3 mi
from camp I did not consider it prudent to go among them I wheeled m[y]
Horse & started on my return in a slow trot as soon as I started back
they called to me & one mounted his horse & came After me with all spe[ed]
when He got within 20 rods of me I stoped & met him the rest followed
on I found them to be Utahs & wanted to trade I informed him by
signs that our camp was near so he went on with me to camp, what we
have seen as yet of the Utahs they appeare friendly & not disposed to steal
from [us] though they have A bad name from some of the mountaineers. He
stoped in camp awhile & wanted to smoke the pipe of peace but we soon
started on & He waited for his company to come up, we travled about
10 miles south under the mountain on the west side of the valley
the land lies beautiful but we could not [page covered]

Page 87

soil as on the east, we then turned our course & returned toward
camp we had to travel 20 miles across the vale to get to the ford of the
Utah outlet we here stoped eat & drank & returned to camp quite weary
Having travled during the day about 30 miles


we saw on the west side of the valley about 75 or 100 mountain
goats, sheep, Antilope &c in flocks playing about the Hills & valley.


[FIGURES] After we Arived in camp President Young called a council of
the quorum of the Twelve there being present B Young
H. C. Kimball, O. Pratt, W. Richards, W. Woodruff G. A. Smith
A Lyman & E. T. Benson. we walked from the north camp to about
the centre between the two creeks when Prest Young waved his
hands & said here is the forty Acres for the Temple (we had conve-
rsed upon the subject of the location for the Temple previous to this)
& the city can be laid out perfectly square North & South, east &
west. It was then moved & carried that the Temple lot contain
40 Acres on the ground whare we stood. It was also moved &
carried that the city be laid out into lots of 10 rods by 20 each
exclusive of the streets & into Blocks of 8 lots each, being 10
acres in each block & one acre & a quarter in each lot. It was also
moved & carried that each street be laid out 8 rods wide &
that there be a side walk on each side 20 feet wide & that each
House be built in the centre of the lot 20 feet from the front
line that there might be A uniformity through out the city &
President Young remarked that He wished but one house built upon
A lot & they being in the centre if they took fire they would not
burn up their neighbors And if any man wants A Market to hous
it upon his own lot & not lay out publick grounds for markets & let
every man cultivate his own lot & set out evry kind of fruit &
shade trees & beautify the city. It was Moved & carried that
there be four public squares of 10 Acres each be laid of in various
parts of the city for public grounds. This was in Lat 40º 45 44
At 8 oclok the whole camp came together on the same ground &
passed all of the above votes unanimously as they are recorded
& when the business part of the meeting was closed President
Young arose And addressed the assembly in a vary interesting mann[er]
upon a variety of subjects. Previous to this the whole assembly voted
that there be a committee to superintend the laying out the city &
that the Twelve be that committee & that they manage the whole
affair.


President Young in his address to the Saints remarked that
He was determined to have order in all things & righteousness should be
practized in this land. That we had come here according to the direction
& council of Br Joseph Smith before his death & that He would still have
been alive if the Twelve had been in Nauvoo when He recrossed the river
from Nauvoo Montrose to Nauvoo. He spoke of the Saints being driv[en]
from place to place, And said the ownly way Boggs, Clark, Lucas,
Benton, & all the leaders of the mob could have been saved in the day
of the Lord Jesus would have been to have come forward voluntari[ly]
& let their heads been cut off & let their blood run upon the ground
& gone up as A smokeing incens before the heavens as an atonement
but now they will be eternally damned. Also said all the governors
& Presidents of the U. S. A Had rejected all our petitions from first
to last, that when the Saints were driven from Illinois & perish
as it were on the prairies then President Polk sends for a draft of
500 men to go into the Army what for, that they might be wasted
[page covered] be [wasting] & it was that [page covered]

Page 88

entirely wasted away as A people, if the brethren had not gone
they would have made war upon us & the Govr. of Mo would have been
ordered not to have let us cross the Missouri & the raising of the Battalion
was our temporal salvation at the time & said Polk would be damned
for this act & that He with many of the goverment men had a hand
in the death of Joseph & Hyram & that they should be damned for
these things & if they ever sent any men to interfere with us here
they shall have there throats cut & sent to Hell, And with uplifted
hands to Heaven swore by the Gods of Eternity that He would never
cease His exhertion while He lived to make every preperation & avenge
the Blood of the Prophets & Saints, that He intended to have evry
hole & corner from the Bay of Francisco to Hudson bay known
to us And that our people bwould be connected with every tribe of
Indians throughout America & that our people would yet take their
squaws wash & dress them up teach them our language & learn them to
labour & learn them the gospel of there forefathers & raise up children
by them & teach the children & not many generations Hence they will
become A white & delightsome people & in no other way will it be done
& that the time was nigh at hand when the gospel must go to that peop-
le. He said He long spoken of giveing a lecture to the females & when He
got time He intended to do it. He spoke of the duty orf man to his God
that He should love him with all of his heart soul, mind, & strength serve
& obey him, And that the woman in like manner ought to obey her husban[d] [page torn]
& not to have A woman every time A man steped out be A watching him
as uneasy as A fish out of water & as soon as he returns O whare have
you been, & what have you been about, & why did you not get back before
& many other things that was none of her business. Her business is to tak[e]
care of her children keep herself clean & House & keep my close [clothes] clean
Instead of that the Husband asks whare is the children the wife will say
O dear I dont know I was so concerned about you I have not thought
about the children, they are probably to some of the neighbors.


He remarked
that when we become settled here He intended to have A school for his
own family & all others might do the same if they chose or Join togeth
er And a tutor ought always to be with the children & not let them
get out of their sight & when they get weary of runing about in the
House & garding let the tutor go with them to the public walks & keep
them out of the streets & see that they do not sware & take the nam[e] [page torn]
of God in vain.


He spoke upon the subject of raising children[,] spirits
taking A tabernacle He said that every spirit was pure when it first entered
the body, but many persons have been ruined in consequence of the
Mother giving way to temptation & fretfulness while in the state of child-
bearing And the Husband ought to be vary tender & kind to the woman
while in that state And the Mothers mind ought to be excercised i[n] [page covered]
good things during the whole time & be calm & composed that what
ever temptation the mother should give way to would effect the child
in after life. many other principles was spoken of By President Young of interest


~ Thursday


29th President Young with his brethren the Twelve & others mounted
our horses & started to meet with the Battalion under the command of
Captain Brown, we met with some of them about 4 miles from
camp we were truly glad to meet with them we continued on up
& soon met with Capts Brown, Higgins, Lieut Willis & the train follo-
wing them we exhamined A good grind stone quiry while on the wa[y] [page covered]
up. I soon met with Br Bevin who went from my family into the
Army there was About 140 of the Battalion And a company of
about 100 of the Missippi saints that came with them from Pueblo
being about 60 waggons in all 100 Horses & Mules & 300 Head of cattle

Page 89

which added greatly to our numbers we had A Heavy shower
of rain while we were in the canion which sent down the water
in the creeks from the mountain's with a rush & roar like thunder
resembling the opening of a flood gate the first rush of the water
came down with a front 3 feet High, some of the waggons had to
stop untill it feell which was but a short time the shower spread
over A good share of the valley whare we were setled, we returned
with the company at there head & march into camp with music, they
took upon there quarters between our two camps on the bank of
the creek. While we have been exploring the camp has been busy
in farming puting in potatoes, corn, beans, peas, buckwheat, &
preparing A garding for garding seeds & will go to work to prepare
a peace for turnips our garding to day was diveided off as each ten
had need, our distance of travel to day was 12 miles


In the evening Br Young with the Twelve walked up to the warm
springs about 1 1/2 miles from the Temple Block we went in & bathed
it was quite as warm as we could endure & be comfortable those
springs are healthy for the sick & diseased


~ Friday


30th [FIGURE] We met in council this morning with the Twelve & Captain
Brown, Higings, Willis & others & Herd the statements of the
officers concerning the Battalion & there situation represented
counsil was given by President Young to the officers what course
to persue. It seemed wisdom for Capt Brown & others to go to the
Bay of San Francisco & report himself & men & the state they were
in Br Brannan would go as there Pilot much conversation took
place during council of interest, Dr Sanderson was spoken of who
had been with the Battalion And it was believed he had tried to poison
the Brethren to death, & that He would be rewarded for his crimes
After the council Broke up we mounted our Horses & rode north
to the warm springs Also visited the Hot spulpher spring 4 miles from
the Temple block it ishues out from under A rock A large fount
ain of water forms A pool about 2 rods square 5 feet deep is
[h]ot [page torn] enough to cook an egg in few moments we could hold our
fingers in it about 10 seconds. After viewing it a while we returned
to camp, I then visited the soldiers camp & allso our planted
ground I found some of our potatoes had rotted some was coming
up our corn was up also beans I returned to camp & had a visit
from Br Dexter Stillman. He wished to come into my family also
Br James Bevin wished to returned again to my family as He
was with me hwhen He went into the Army.


At 8 oclok All the camps met together & was Addressed for more
than an hour by President Young in An interesting manner clot[hed]
with the spirit of God. He expressed hif [his] feelyings freely concerning the
treatment of the government towards us in the same manner as He
did on the eve of the 28th. He informed the Brethren that there going
into the Armey proved our temporal salvation at the time for
the Governor of Mo had already recievied orders not to let our
people pass the Mo river if we did not enlist, the goverment intend
to diestroy us from off the face of the earth but through the Blessing
of God we are here and I thank my Heavenly father for it and
He knew we should prevail Zion would arise the Judgments of
God would be poured out the Blood of the Prophets would be ave[nged]
& their cup would be filled double unto them. And if we were fait[h]
ful we should yet have Brs Joseph & Hiram & many of the Sain[ts]
in there resurrected Bodies with us on earth & when we died s[hould]

Page 90

not sleep but a little time but should come forth out of our gr[aves] [page covered]
with Bodies that no mob could kill. We were much edifyed wi[th] [page covered]
all the remarks He made. the meeting opened with A shout of
Hosannah to God & the Lamb repeated three times with its Amens
Br Young said the Ancient of days was not as far off as many
supposed. At the close of the meeting I returned to rest meditating u[pon] [page covered]
what I had herd An appointment was made for the Battalion to
prepare A Bowery on the Morrow for our Sabbath Meetings. 18 [miles]


~ Saturday


31st Saturday I spent the morning in writing, the Battalion we[nt] [page covered]
to work at the Bower, our camp sowing & planting. About noon
a company of about 20 Utahs visited our camp there seemed
to be two parties of them they came to trade with us & whi[le] [page covered]
traiding deerskins for powder & lead &c one Indian str[uck] [page covered]
another one over his head with his gun & broke it the old c[hief] [page covered]
whiped them both, & during the Afternoon the one that h[ad] [page covered]
the gun broke over his head stole the other ones Horse & put
out with it soon the Indians found it out & put after him
followed him into a canion & shot both him & his horse dea[d] [page covered]
& returned to our camp with the Horse that the Indian sto[le] [page covered]
the Utahs appear vary friendly to us as yet, there was A ru[m-]
our to day that the Indians intended to come & ask pay for
their lands, Br Young has expressed his opinion that we
should not buy any land of the Indians but as the Lord
made the land there was enough for both them & us, that [we] [page covered]
would teach them to labour & cultivate the earth Br Pratts
opinion was that we should not feed them at all untill th[ey] [page covered]
had done sumthing for it so as to begin right with them & teac[h] [page covered]
them industry.


During the evening I went down to the
Utah outlet with several of the brethren & drew a net 4 ti[mes] [page covered]
& caught one fish, they needed a boat & could not get m[any] [page covered]
fish without it. travled during the day 123 m


~ Sunday


August 1st Sunday. The congregation of the Saints assemb[led] [page covered]
under the Bower on the Temple lot at 10 oclok meeting opened
by singing & prayer Br Kimball Addressed the meeting for a
while & expressed his feelings upon a variety of subjects af[ter] [page covered]
which Br O Pratt preached A discourse upon the prophecies
of Isaiah & others concerning the building up of Zion in the la[st] [page covered]
days & thought many of those prophesies alluded to us in our pres
ent position such as Zion should be a city sought & not forsa[ken] [page covered] [Isaiah 62:12]
& that the munition of rocks should be a defence unto them [Isaiah 33:16]
the Lord sware that their corn & wine should no more be given
to their enemies, [Isaiah 62:8] & that the house of God should be built up[on] [page covered]
the tops of the mountain [Isaiah 2:2] &c He had the spirit of preachi[ng] [page covered]
& we were all edifyed, when He closed Dr Richards read a
letter from the commanding officer of the Battalion who
had gone with them to the Pacific spoke in the Highest term[s] [page covered]
of praise of them in all their procedings. Also A letter
from Captain Hunt on the 3rd of Feb was read. Br Kimb[all] [page covered]
made some remarks concerning our traiding with the India[ns] [page covered]
that we ought to Harken to council & keep our amunitio[n] [page covered]
& not trade with them at all at present the Indians left
our encampment in the night & whether they stole any thing
or not we do not yet know. Congregation came together aga[in] [page covered]
at 2 oclok the Bishops broke bread to the congregation Dr Richa[rds] [page covered]
read the revelation given at winter quarters & the whole s[illegible] [page faded]

Page 91

recieved it with A universal vote Br A Lyman Addressed the meeting
at length & spoke to edifycation after which some business matters
were brought up & it was decided to commenced Building our Houses
for those who were to tarry through the winter of Dobies instd
of timber & put the buildings together in stead of a stockade
for a defence against the Indians. And all oxen that are to
go back this season should start one week from tomorrow
& various orther matters were attended A vote was taken to
cease entirely traiding with the Indians & have no intercourse
with them at all. we also decided to form all the encampme[n]ts
into one. In the evening the Twelve met & decided for Br Benson [page covered]
go back & metet the camp, & 3 others go with him to get the mail &
[page covered] [b]ring word concerning them.


~ Monday


2nd [FIGURES] Br Benson starts for the camp to day I wrote A letter to
Father Woodruff by him we commenced to day to lay out the city
plott commiencing with the Temple Block, we formed our whole enca
mpment to day into one circle, on forming our temple block of
40 acres it was so large we held a council to see if it was not wisdom
to reduce it one half the size several expressed their opinion upon
the subject, G. A. Smith believed if we done it we should be sorry
afterwards would rather enlarge than diminish it, Br Kimball though[t] [page covered]
if we let it be as it was & set it out to shrubery we should not
be sorry Br A Lyman said G. A. Smith had spoke his mind &
all our minds seemed to run in about the same channel, the
President said we could eisier diminish than enlarge it afterwar[d] [page covered]
& finally decided to let it remain as it was, we also walked
upon a peace of table land above east of the camp & took a view
of the table city ground which presented a grand prospect to
our view. In the evening I went to the warm sulpher springs
& bathed with Dr Richards G. A. Smith & others


~ Tuesday


3rd Our ten sowed our Buck wheat to day a little over one bushel
on two acres, O Pratt one third, G. A. Smith one third, & W Woodruff
one third, mine to dbe divided between A. O. Smoot Br Dewey &
Aphek Woodruff. All the encampment are busiy to day in farming,
laying out the city, preparing for making dobys lime &c


I recieved of Br [blank] Case 19 lbs of Iron at 25 cts per lb $4.75
I visited the farming grounds gardings &c & found things coming up
well such as corn, beans, potatoes &c I went in the evening to the
warm spring to bathe with Dr Richards


~ Wednesday


4th I met in council this morning with the Twelve to set upon
case brought up By Br Gribble concerning improper conduct
of one or two men with his wife there was contradictory test
emony & the case was finally dismissed for the time being. We
again met in council concerning the size of the temple square
it was finally considered we could not do justice to 40 acres to
begin with & finally concluded to confine the Temple & gard[ing]
to 10 acres. After council I rode with G. A. Smith to the mountai[n]
to find some timber to put us up a small building for a store House &
men also commenced to day to prepare ground to commenced ma[king]
Dobys for puting up a fort

Page 92

~ Thursday


[5th] [page covered] [FIGURE] As we were under the necessity of returning soon & wanted some
place to unload our goods that we had with us & those that were
coming up we thought it best to go into the mountains & draw out logs &
build us some cabins as the doby houses might not be ready Brs
Young & Kimball had commenced drawing out logs for their build-
ings Br G. A. Smith & myself concluded to join our effortts together
& do what we could, so I took my ax this morning & in company
with G. A. Smith went to the mountain about 6 miles we had sever-
al men with us to assist in choping we found a grove of fir trees
that we thought would answer well we had to make A road to it
& bridges across the creek I some dreaded the job, for it was a
hard one And I do not exercise the prudence that I ought when
I take hold of hard labour but do more than is good for me
I however commenced choping down trees & done much
more work during the day than any other man on the ground
we choped drew out more logs more logs than to build one house
16 foot square & drew home to the fort 25 of them I blistered
up my hands & was vary weary at night distance of the day 14 m


~ Friday


6 I arose early this morning quite sore with my labour I went
into the valley for my horses & we could not find them. some
Indians had been camp this morning or rather in the night
& left again & we supposed they had taken a drove of horses
with them so we sent our horsman & drove in all the horses in the
valley to see how many was gone, but much to our joy we found all
of our horses was safe which increased our confidence in the Ind-
ians that were around us, I had rode about 8 miles without a
saddle which was wors than labour, we however got our teams
together & started for the mountains with 5 teams, & 4 teams
went also for Dr Richards to draw logs for him, I sadled my
horse & took my ax, & went to the timber before them, & before
they arived I cut 5 large fir trees & when the teams came
up the men assisted to cut up the trees & draw them out &
load them, & we laboured exceding hard all day & we drew
home during the day 52 logs great & small, except one load that
we left by the wayside untill morning, this made 77 logs in
two days that we cut & drew home, in two days we got timber
sufficient for two buildings each of us one but I had lab-
oured so hard during the two days I could hardly stand upon
my feet I went to my waggon & flung myself upon my
bed to rest. I had not been on the bed but a short time before
Br Kimball called upon me & informed me that the Twelve
were going soon to the water to be Baptized for the remission
of their sins
to set an example to the Church As the[y] would be
called upon on Sunday morning to bye baptized by the Twelve
or all those that wished, we considerd this A duty & privlege as we
come into a glorious valley to locate & build a temple & build up
Zion we felt like renewing our covenant before the Lord and
each other.


We soon repaired to the water & President
Brigham Young went down into the water & Baptized all his
Brethren the Twelve that were with him by burying them in the
water He also confirmed inus in the Church & sealed upon us our
Apostleship & all the keys, powers, & Blessings belonging to that office
Br Heber C. Kimball Baptized & confirmed President Brigham Young
the following are the names of those present on this occasion B. Young
H. C. Kimball O. Pratt W. Richards W. Woodruff G. A. Smith & A Lyman
distance of the day 20

Page 93

~ Saturday


7th I Arose this morning quite weary with my labours of yesterday
I spent the day mostly in assisting Br Fowler to start on a Journey to
the Bay of Francisco to get his family I made arangments with
Capt Brown to furnish him with a horse to ride & put him up prov-
isions to last him to fort Hall & there they would get supplys. In
[FIGURE] In the afternoon the Twelve went onto the Temple Block & picked
out there inheritances President Young took a block east of the
temple & runing S.E. to settle his friends around him. Br H. C. Kimball
took A block North of the Temple will settle his friends on the north
O pratt south of the Temple Joining the temple Block & runs south.
W. Woodruff took A Block kcornering on the Temple lot at the S. west
corner Joining O Pratts Block & will settle his friend's on the south
A Lyman took A Block 40 rods Below or west of w. woodruff
Bolock & runs s west of the Temple to settle his friends G. A. Smith
took A Block Joining the Temple on the west & runs due west. it
was supposed Br Young Richards would take his inheritances on the east
near Br. Young none others of the Twelve were present in the camp Br
Benson had gone back to meet the camp & 3 of the quorum was in winter
quarters
.


During the evening in company with the Twelve I went to one
of the pure streams of cold water that runs through the City &
H C Kimball baptized 55 members of the camp for the remission of
their sins
who were confirmed under the Hands of Presidents Young
O Pratt, W Woodruff, A Lyman, & G. A. Smith B Young was mouth
in confirming the greatest number of them


~ Sunday


8th Sunday morning at 6 oclock the Bishops repaired with the Twelve
[FIGURE] to the streams of water for the purpose of Baptizing & confirming the
whole camp who had not been since we came into the valley
we felt it our privilege to be baptized & to Baptize the Camp of Israel
for the remission of our sins & to renew our covenants before the
Lord, Brothers Lewis, Godard, Everett Shumway Snow & H C Kimball
baptized & the Twelve confirmed them there were 224 Baptized
& confirmed this morning 99 of which I confirmed with my
own hands making 288 in all that have been baptized in the camp
during the last 3 days. The camp assembled as usual at 10 oclok for
meeting And was addressed as usual by H. C. Kimball who had the spirit
of speaking unto edifycation I followed him And was never blessed with
greater liberty of speach in addressing a congregation I was edifyed myself
& those that herd. In the afternoon we met again & partook of
the sacrament Br Lorenzo Young addressed the people & was followed
by Br Brigham Young who was feeble in health, he gave good council
& we were edefyed, at the close of the meeting 110 men were called up
to go onto the Doby yard 76 volunteered & they thought that woul[d]
answer for A commencment. [FIGURE]


The following are some of the remarks made by w. woodruff [in]
his address to the Saints in the fore part of the day written by Th[omas]
Bullock
clerk. I have been much edifyed in the teaching giv[en]
by Elder ^Kimball^, & have reflected much since I came into this valley, con[cer]
ning our situation, our calling, & the work that is required at ou[r]
hands. And the words of one of the Apostles will apply well to [our]
case "that when we have done the will of God we have need of
patience that we may obtain the blessing's & though it tarry lo[ng]
we should obtain it if we continued faithful" Of all
people that ever lived we have the greatest reason to be fait[hful]

Page 94

& exercise patience & not be weary in well doing for we have
the greatest work to perform & Blessings promised accordingly.
The day has come when the Lord has set his hand with full pur-
pose of heart to esstablish his Kingdom on the earth, gather Israel
build up Zion & Jerrusalem make an end of sin & cause all
nations to bow the knee & every tongue to confess tha[t] Jesus is
the Lord & has a right to reign on the earth And ye are the
people ye Elders of Israel & Latter Day Saints that are moved
upon & called & chosen to do this work, who is sufficient for
these things, & what manner of persons ought ye to be. I rejoice
that I enjoy the society of so many of the Saints this day in this
glorious valley which has not been peolluted by the ungodly
gentiles & that I can speak with freedom without being trampled
by wicked men. the difference in the society tBetween the Saints
& the gentiles in the United States can ownly be contrasted betw-
een Heaven & Hell in comparison for let an elder of this Church
start from New York & travel to Saint Louis & let the people know
who he is & He would be in Hell all the time a& there is A cause for
this A Prophet Seer & Revelater. Patriarchs & Apostles have been raised
up in there midst, the Church & kingdom of God has been planted
among them, the gospel preached & salvation freely offered unto all &
what have they done, they have stoned the Prophets & killed them
poured out their Blood like water upon the earth, have burned their
dwellings & given their goods to the flames, have driven the Apostles
with the keys of Eternal life & salvation with the entire Church
& kingdom of God out of their midst into the wilderness & the mountai[n]s
yets they have turned the last key that has sealed & locked fast their
condemnation that lingereth not & there damnation that slumber
eth not. And this is the reason why they are full of hell & desire to
destroy every thing that retainets any portion of the spirit of the spirit
of Gods. But if it requires all the martered Saints in Heaven from
Rig[h]teous Abel to Joseph to go forth from the temple in Heaven
& [p]our out all the vials of the last plagues upon the United
States & open the seals upon them in order to avenge the Blood
of the Prophets & Saints which they have spilt, it will be done
for that Blood shall spedily be avenged. Yea vary spedily
The Prophet Joseph, The Twelve Apostles, with many of the
Elders of Israel & Saints Have been called to pass through scenes
of sufferings & privations, that would have discouraged an Allexan
der
, they have had to combat earth and Hell, wicked men & devils,
sickness & death, Burnings Drivings & persecutions, but have
we ben discouraged no the greater the difficulties the
more we have been stimulated to Action, what has sus
tained us & inspired us to action in the midst of these
difficulties? We have been upheld by the power of God that
we might fulfill his purposes. Our spirits have been stired up by the
spilt Blood of the Martered Prophets which still cries from the ground
[to] [page covered] heaven for vengance & will not rest neither let us untill it is
avenged, we have also been moved upon by the spirits of our
fathers & Progenitors whose bodies have lain in the dust for many
generations, who recieved not the gospel in the flesh not having it
proffered unto them, but are now waiting for the redemption of their
bodies After salvation shall be sealed upon them through the instru
mentality of their sons who should embrace the gospel in the fulness
of times
, we are also moved upon by the Holy Ghost to accomplish the
great work of the last days & fulness of times in preparing the ear[th] [page torn]

Page 95

for the reign of Christ, & to fulfill the promises which was made
to the Ancient Prophets & Patriarch which promises they drew from
the Heavens by their faith & faithfulness before the Lord & saw the
work that lies before us by the spirit of inspiration revelation dreams
& the visions of Heaven. Thus it has been that A combination
of causes of eternal & important consequence has stimulated the Proph[ets]
Apostles & Elders to action untill they have resolved in their hearts that
for Zions sake they would not hold their peace & for Jerrusalem sake
they would not rest, untill their righteousness goes forth as Brightness
& salvation as A Lamp that Burneth. Yea the time has come for the
Lord to esstablish his kingdom on the earth & to make A short work of it
& overthrow the Kingdom of the devel, for He has held dominion on
the earth for many generations & in one instance undertook to
claim his right to all the Kingdoms of the world before the Lord wh[en]
He showed the Savior all the kingdoms of the world & proffered to
give them to him if He would fall down & worship him, when in
fact the Poor Devil did did not own one foot of land on the earth [Matthew 4:8-9]
I feel also that the time has come when we can no more preach salvation
to those of the gentiles who have rejected the prophets & killed them &
cast the saints & the gospel out of their midst, the last time I was
through the United States I could not preach salvation to the people
but I could have the spirit of God to preach damnation to them fo[r]
they were worthy I tried to preach a gospel sermon in the Temple
in Nauvoo to many of the world who were present But it was hard
work to do it. But I could tell them about their spilling the
Blood of the Prophets & the judgments that must follow them
& that they had not got done with Joseph Smith but he would yet r[ule] [page covered]
in judgment against them & condemn them.


I will close by relating An circumstance that transpired when I was in
the eastern states on my return ofrom England I went to the state of
Connecticut (my native place) to get my father to bring to Zion. I
thought if Joseph was Justifyed in giving commandment to have hi[s]
bones taken to be buried in Canaan, that I was Justifyed In taking my
living father & gathering him with the Saints & while At his house
was visited by my Fathers sister Aunt Wheeler who was naturly a
good woman & A strenuous Prysbeterian while conversing about our lea[ving] [page covered]
& going so far off she asked me with tears in her eyes if I suppo[sed] [page covered]
we could find any Christian society to associate with. I replyed for
Gods sake & our sake I hope not, she gazed at me with amazement
& wondered why I should feel so, I replyed that the Christians of
this generation in the United States had persecuted us to all intents &
purposes had burned our dwellings, given our goods to the flames
had murdered our Brethren, Sistiers, wives & children had marte
our Prophets, Patriarchs, & Apostles & driven the remainder of
us from their midst & should we now desire their society & see[k]
their religion? No I would rather be in the midst of the griselly [grizzly bears] [page covered]
of the rocky mountains, or mingle with the society of the savages [in]
the forest, than to longer mingle with such Christians or longer
bear the fruits of their religion


~ Monday


9th I spent the day in making A saw pit


~ Tuesday


10th I spent the day in preparing timber for our dwellings in the for
we decided by council to enclose one Block of 10 acres with dobys [adobies] &
buildings as a fort or fortification.


~ Wednesday


[11th] [page folded] I spent this day in framing timber the company also comm[enced]
[l]aying [page folded] their wall on one side of the lot one doby & a half thick 2 1/2

Page 96

[page torn] [gr]ace for grace. when Brother Joseph received the Priesthood
he did not recived all at once, but He was A prophet seer & Revela[tor] [page torn]
before He recieved the fulness of the Priesthood & keys of the kingd[om] [page torn]
He first recieved the Aronick Priesthood & Keys from under the hand
of John the Baptisk. He then had not power to lay on hands to confirm
the Church but afterwards he recieved the Patriarchal or Melchisidick
Priesthood
from under the Hands of Peter James & John who were
of the Twelve Apostles & were the Presidency when the other Apostl[es]
were absent, from those Apostles Joseph Smith recieved every key [FIGURE]
power, Blessing, & privilege of the Highest Authority of the Melchezedick
Priesthood ever committed to man on the earth which they held
some have had fears that we had not power to get revelations since
the death of Joseph, But I want this subject from this time forth
to be forever set at rest And I want this Church to understand
from this day henceforth & forever that an apostle is the Highest
office & Authority that there is in the Church & kingdom of God
on the earth. from whom did Joseph recieve his authority from
just such men as sit around me here (pointing to the Twelve
Apostles that sat with him) Peter James & John were Apostles &
there was no noise about their being seers & Revelators though those
gifts were among them. Joseph Smith gave unto me & my brethr[en]
the Twelve all the Priesthood keys Power & Authority which he ha[d]
And those are powers which belong to the Apostleship. In Joseph[s]
day we had to ordain Patriarchs could we ordain men to Author[ity]
greater than we held ourselves^?^ No. But it is necessary to have Patria[rchs]
to Bless the People that they may have Blessings by the spirit of prop[hecy]
& Revelation sealed upon their heads & their posterity & know what
awaits their posterity Father Smith was the Seignor Patriarch in the
Church & first Patriarch in our day & Afterwards Hiyram was th[e]
seignor Patriarch for his father sealed it upon his head But was
there Power & Authority different from all Patriarchs in the
church No they were all alike in their authority in Blessing. Elijah is
spoken of in the Bible that He should come in the last days to sta
turn the hearts of the fathers to the children & the children to their
fathers, [Malachi 4:6] the fulfillment of this scripture is manifest in esstablishing
the kingdom of God & Priesthood on the earth in the last days & those
who hold the keys of the priesthood & sealing power have the spirit
& power of Elijah & it is necessary in order to redeem our dead &
save our children there is much more importance attached to this than
Parents are aware of. In the loss of this child of Brother Crows that was
drowned I felt that I could weep in sorrow if I gave way to my feelings
for I realize it is A loss to the parents to loose little children. it is true al[l]
children are saved there names are written in the Lambs book of li[fe]
which was the case with every spirit that takes A tabernacle on
this earth. their names were written there before the world was
made, & will there ever remain untill they sin against the Holy Gho[st]
it will then be blotted out no more to be recorded forever. But not
withstanding this can brother Crow get that child again or any othe[r]
person their children except their is sumthing done for them on the
earth by their parents, No they would not, they would go to God who
gave them but the parents on the earth would not have them, the
Parents framed the Body to be sure But the Lord gave the spirit
what is the Body good for without the spirit. what then can [be]
done, I will tell you A man that has embraced the gospel must [be]
some one who has the Priesthood & keys & power of Elijah, & mu[st]
[att]end to ordinances for that child, even must be baptized fo[r it]
[page torn] [2 illegible words] as to have it sealed to him & through t[he] [2 illegible words] [page torn]

Page 97

[page torn] [Br] Crow had a young ^grand^ child drowned today. The child's name was Thirlkie


~ Thursday


[page torn] [12th] Br Crows ^grand^ child was buried today. I commenced to day to lay the
[page torn] [f]oundation of our houses the Block is laid in the following manner
on the East side of the block commencing on the NE corner
B Young 4 rooms L Young 2 rooms, H C Kimball 5 rooms W Richards
2 rooms, W. Woodruff 2 rooms 14 by 17, G. A. Smith 2 rooms A Lyman
2 rooms L Snow 1 Rooms All rooms are 14 feet wide and as
long as we please G. A. Smith & myself Build together 2 rooms each
we laid the foundation of the 4 to day I was quite unwell at night


~ Friday


13th I spent some part of the day in council each one of the
Twelve was to make choice of the Blocks that they were to settle
their friends upon. Br Brigham Young took towo tier of Blocks
south through the City. Br Kimball run North & N west O Pratt
4 Blocks W Woodruff 8 Blocks G A Smith 8, & A Lyman
12 Blocks according to the company organized with them.


~ Saturday


[1]4th I was quite unwell through the day & did not feel able to
labour. 4 of the messengers returned from Bear River valley & cash
valley
who started with Capt Brown that has gone with a company to
[t]he Bay via Fort Hall. The messengers Bring a glorious report of
[C]ash valley & the country between us & there, that is rich soil &
well watered & weell calculated for farming purposes Also bear
[r]iver valley for stock graizing &c called at Miles Goodyiers place
had about 30 yards pickedted in A small garding corn & vegitation
doing well. it was about 90 miles from the City of the Salt lake
[t]o Cash valley & [blank] miles toor Bear River valley. our Brethren brought
[i]n 4 loads of salt from the lake which was obtained with little
[t]rouble As it lay in bars, banks, & beds in the edge of the water &
[h]ad to be shoveld up, washed, dreaned, &c & was then prepared
[f]or use. The Brethren also returned that went to the Utah lake to get
[f]ish they could not get quite to the lake with a waggon without
working the road some, & having no tools returned found A mount
[a]in of granite good for building runing from 7 to 15 miles from camp
The quorum of the Twelve decided in council that the name of
[o]ur city should be TCity of the Salt Lake. Great Bason, North America


~ Sunday


[1]5th [FIGURES] Sunday The camp of Israel met as usal at 10 oclok
& was addressed by President Young in an interesting
manner upon an interesting subject much to our edifycation.
The following are some of the remarks made by President Young. I am
going to day sto speak upon the subject of the Patriarchal Priesthood &
by request of Br Crow say sumthing upon the death of his child that
was drowned the other day. I hope to speak so as to be understood
There is a reality in eternal things as much as in the things of time
which we daily see with our eyes when A man has A dream or
[v]ision of eternal things it is an evidence of its truth as much as
[t]hough He saw it with his own eyes in one sens of the word. The
Lord has hid from man the things that He knew before He
came in the flesh that He might walk by faith & prove himself
[w]hile here. The Lord converses with men on the earth in the
[f]orm of A servent & by visions & dreams &c but He never appea[rs to]
man in the flesh in the fulness of his glory, for He is as a
[c]onsuming fire & a mortal body would perish in an instant
The Priesthood is again restored on the earth to bring back illegible] [text faded]
[w]hich 2 illegible words] [page torn] we do not recieve all at once but 2 illegible words] [page torn]

Page 98

[page torn] [c]laim his child in the morning of the resurrection & the Lord
will give it up to him. I had my children sealed to me in the
[page torn] [t]emple except one that died & that I shall leave in the hands of
[page torn] [t]he Lord, untill I have another opportunity. As soon as we get
up some doby Houses for our families we shall go to work to
build another Temple & as soon as A place is prepared we shal[l]
commence the Endowments long before the Temple is built &
we shall take time, & each step the Saints take let them take time
enough about it to understand it. evry thing at Nauvoo went with
a rush we had to build the Temple with the trowel in one hand &
the sword in the other & mobs were upon us all the while and
many crying out O the temple cant be built. I told them it should
be built, this Church should not fall & the Lord said if we did not
build it we should be rejected as a Church with our dead why did
He say it because the Saints were becoming slothful & covetous & would
spend their means upon fine Houses for themselves before they would
put it into A House for the Lord. But we went at it & finished
it & turned it over into the hands of the Lord in spite of earth & Hell
& the Brethren was so faithful at it that we laboured day [and] night to give
them their endowments. The children want to be sealed to their parents
& parents to their children, that they may have blessings in eternity that
they will stand in need of. God promised to Abraham that his seed
should be as numerous as the stars of Heaven & the sands of the seashore &
to his seed there should be no end [Genesis 22:17] this of course would continue
through all Eternity, the same blessing is upon our heads if we are faith
ful for our eyes have not seen, our ears herd neither entered into our
hearts the great things that God has in store for us. & when I look
upon the great work the Elders of Israel have to perform & look
around upon them & see them vain & foolish, it makes me sorrowful
they forget their calling. O ye Elders of Israel think for a moment
what manner of persons ought ye to be, men who hold the priesthood
& keys of salvation & have power to go to the Nations of the Earth &
& say Here Gentleman & Ladies I have salvation for you & power to exhalt
you to Celestial Glory, or if you reject it to seal you unto damnation
it is no trifling affair to have power put into your hand to deal with
[t]he Eternal destinies of the sons & daughters of Adam that form
the Nations of the earth. While in the Temple at Nauvoo we voted
to cut off the gentiles who had rejected the gospel & killed the prophets
& it was recorded on earth & if it is recorded in heaven that Nation wi[ll]
go down quickly. Many other interesting & important items were presented
by President Young much to our edifycation. meeting was dismissed &
met again at 2 oclok & was Addressed in a vary edifying manner
by O Pratt, & treated upon the same principles spoken off [of] by Br
Young. Among his remarks He said, that as all the ordinances of the
gospel Administered by the world since the Aposticy of the Church
was illegal, in like manner was the marriage cerimony illegal and all
the world who had been begotton through the illegal marriage, were
Bastards & not sons & Hence they had to enter into the law of adopti[on] [ink spot]
& be adopted into the Priesthood in order to become sons & legal hei[rs]
[o]f salvation.


Erastus Snow followed & spoke much to our edi
[f]ycation after which meeting was dismissed.


President Young met with the company who were to start back
in the morning with the ox teams there were over 60 in number
& gave good instructions to them, many of the Battalion deposited there
[g]uns with President Young for safe keeping

Page 99

~ Monday


16th The company was quite busy in preparing their teams & wagg[ons] [page torn]
to start back. I undersigned Br Stillman for two yoke of cattle to
send back for his family to be returned in one year from this time.
Brother Samuel Badham recepted to me all money due him for his
services in the United States war to be paid to me by Capt Brown or any
person in whose hands it may be in. I also recieved one yoke of cattle
from Br [blank] Sargent loned me to assist Br Stillman, my own
family, or any body els I thought proper


~ Tuesday


17th Br Smith & myself concluded to put up two rooms each
instead of of one, making 4 rooms between us so we commenced
drawing timber to day though it is vary hard labour for us


~ Wednesday


18th Spent the day drawing timber


~ Thursday to ~ Friday


19 & 20 was Also spent in drawing timber & laying up logs
into the Houses I labour so hard & am so weary at night I
cannot rest. this evening while unloading the last load of logs
one stick fell on Br G. A. Smith head & knocked him down
cut a hole in his head & hurt him badly.


~ Saturday


21st I spent the day in laying up our Houses Br George A was
Able to walk about but not to do any work Brs Young & Kimba[ll]
moved into their Houses this evening


~ Sunday


22nd Sunday I went to the warm springs & bathed in the morning
met in conference with the Twelve & saints at 1 oclok & resolved
universally to call this place city of the great salt Lake. of the great
Bason North America
. Named the stream runing through the city
City Creek the Utah outlet western Jordon & two creeks coming
out of the mountains great canion creek & little canion creek
& one large stream Mill Creek. voted to fence in the city or
portions of it for farming purposes for the coming year; voted
to appoint A President, & High Council, & all other necessary officers
in this stake of Zion. The Twelve write an epistle to leave with
the Saints in the City of the great salt lake Adjourned untill
the 6th of October AD 1848


~ Monday


23rd. I spent the day laying up our buildings we got the bodies of the
4 rooms nearly up I was vary weary at night


~ Tuesday


24th We finished laying up onthe timber of our rooms & I put the
roof on one room & put on one coat of mud & made one door
& hung it


~ Wednesday


25th I laid my floor & laid part of oa chamber & moved my
goods into the house & left them in care of Brother J Bevin I buil[t]
a good chimney which draws well Br johnson put it up for me
I had prayers in the house in the evening. we shall leave
this valley in the morning to start back to winter Quarters.
we as A pioneer company have accomplished more this season th[an]
can be found on record concerning any set of men since the
days of Adam. Having travled with heavy loaded waggons ov[er]
one thousand miles having made our road more than one half
of the way over & through the rough mountains & canions &
searched out a glorious land as a resting place fore the Saints &
in one month after our arival laid out a city Ttwo miles squar[e]
& built A fort & fortification of hewn timber drawn 7 miles f[rom]

Page 100

the mountains & of unburnt brick surrounding 10 acres of ground, 40
rods of which was coverd with Block Houses. Besides planting about
100 Acres of corn, potatoes, Buckwheat turnips gardens &c the pioneers
did not exceed 150 men during the time 140 of the Battalion arived
I think there was not over 100 men labouring on the works at
a time besides much exploring was done And after accomplishing
this work the company return to winter Quarters the place
of Begining making nearly 2,500 miles traveling during one
summer besides all the labour


~ Thursday


26th The pioneer camp with a large number of the Battalion
Harnessed up our horses this morning & bid farewell to our
frinds who was to tarry I put A pair of mules on my carriage
& Brother Stillman drove them I rode on Hors back I went
through the corn & Potatoe fields which which has been
planted one month this day the corn was about tosseling
out the nearly one foot high the Buckwheat looked well
we drove to a spring 15 miles from camp & spent the
night I drove Broak my whippletree & had to make a new
one It was exceding dusty 15 miles


~ Friday


[2]7th We travled to day 25 miles & camped 8 miles east of
[page covered] [t]he weaver 25


~ Saturday


[2]8 We travled to day 25 miles & camped 8 miles
[e]ast of the weaver


~ Sunday


[FIGURES] Sunday
[2]9th We travled in the fore part of the day 15 miles
nooned by a spring 15 miles west of Mathews Cave
we here were met by our messengers who had been on
[to] meet the camp Br E. T. Benson & others they were truly
welcome messengers, for our Anxiety had been vary great to hear
from our families & the camp, & to our joy we herd from them
[th]is day. the camp No near 600 waggons, & divided into 9 co
[m]pinies I also recieved 3 letters from Mrs Woodruff & one from
[A]. O. Smoot Mrs Woodruffs letters brought me intelligence of
[a]ll matters appertaining to my cattle, cows, Business matters & fami[ly]
concerns, & I find that some persons who I have tried to do
[g]ood & save, are filled with folly & the poison of Asps are under
[t]heir tongue & are tatling, lying, & destroying themselves & using
[e]vry exhertion to destroy the peace of my family. The letters
[i]nform me that Father Woodruff is coming along & is well
Also Mary Jackson is along in his waggon, Br & Sister Armstrong
has one of my waggons, Mother Woodruff has gone Back to
Iowa to live with Dwight & Eunice Woodruff & And it would
have been for the peace & Happiness of my family if B. C &
M. J. had been with them for they are foolish & do not cho[o]se
[t]hings which are right & righteous. We obtained much news
[o]f interest from the mail about matters in general. we camp[ed]
[f]or the night within 4 miles of Bear River distance 26 m


~ Monday


[3]0th We travled 243 miles to day & camped within 27 miles of fort
[B]ridger
we crossed Bear river. the Brethren found A good chance to escape
[t]he long steep hill we last passed by going one side of it 343 mils


~ Tuesday


[3]1st We travled to fort Bridger & camped 2 miles east of the fort
the Brethren done A good deal of traiding at the fort distance 27 m

Page 101

~ Wednesday


Sept 1st One half of the horses of the Camp were missing we thought
they were stolen by the snake Indians who were at Bridgers the
night before but after long searching we found them, & went on
our journey, & travled 15 miles & camped on the bank of a creek
we travled in the afternoon 18 miles & camped on Hams fork
distance of the day (excellent grass) 33 mi


~ Thursday


2nd travled to green river & camped upon the river bank it was
vary windy & cold in the evening distance 23 m


~ Friday


3rd Travled to Big Sandy & nooned 12 miles & in the afternoon
17 miles & camped again upon big sandy and here to our j[oy]
we met with the first fifty of the six hundred waggons
which was Br Spencers hundred it was a joyful meeting
we called a meeting of the Camp in the evening twhi[ch]
was addressed in the following order by G A. Smith B.
Young
H. C. Kimball & W. Woodruff we had truly
an interesting meeting giving a description of the Coun[try]
teaching principle. President Young rebuked sin in so[me]
persons. [FIGURE] distance of the day 28


~ Saturday


[FIGURE]
4th We travled to little Sandy 8 miles & to our joy
we met with Capt Sessions fifty here we found
Parly Pratt fifty of company I dined with Br Abbott
& family, while here I recieved a letter from Br
J Ferguson from the Army, in the afternoon the
quorum of the Twelve met in Council & one of the
most interesting Councils we ever held together on the
earth. In the begining of the Council two of the quor
um was reproved sharply for undo[i]ng what the
majority of the quorum had done in the organizing
of the camps for travelling. At first it was not recieved
but afterwards the error was recieved & seen, confession
made & much teaching given by the President &
the power of God rested upon us & our hearts
melted & our eyes in tears. The President said
if he did not tell us our faults we would be destroyed
but if he told us of them & reproved us we would
live in love & our hearts be semented together
Brothers Parley P Pratt & J Taylor had been to England & done a good
work had returned to winter quarters, & there done wrong by
disorganizing the two divisions & companies that the quorum o[f]
the Twelve had spent the whole winter in organizing & which
was also governed by revelation, Br Parley took the lead in th[e]
matter & entirly disregarded our organisation & mixed the co[mp]
anies all up Br Young chustized him for his course & taught us
principle said that when we set a part one or more of the
Twelve to go & do a certain piece of work they would be
blessed in doing that & the quorum would back up what they
did, but when one or more of the quorum interfere with t[he]
work of the majority of the quorum they burn their fingers
& do wrong when the majority of the quorum of the 12 plant [a]
stake of Zion & esstablish a President over the Stake & appoin[t]
a High Council there has the minority of the Twelve one or mor[e]
any right to go & interfere with those Councils? No unless they
should get corrupt & do wrong then it would be the duty

Page 102

[page torn] [o]f any one of the quorum of the Twelve to show them their error
& teach them what was right, & should the majority of those coun-
cils get corrupt & try to lead asstray the people it would then be the
duty of any one of the Twelve to disannul those councils & call upon
the people to sustain him & appoint a new one but while the Councils
are trying to do right it would be the duty of the Twelve who might be
with them to assist them in carrying out those views that the majority
of the Twelve had esstablished. The quorum of the Twelve all
decided that Br Pratt had committed an error in not carrying out the
organization as esstablished by the Twelve Br Pratt at first had
a hard spirit afterwords repented & confessed his fault & the Power
of God
rested upon President Young & the whole quorum, President
Young said that he felt Eternity upon him & was weighed down to the
earth with this work & that Br Kimble felt the weight of it more
than any other man except himself each one of the quorum exp
ressed their feelings upon the subject & we all had a good time
Br Young said he should chastize Br Parley or any one of the
quorum as much as he pleased when they were out of the wasy &
they could not help themselves but he done it for their good
& ownly done it when constrained to do it by the power of God
Br. H. C. Kimball addressed by [br] Young & wished him to rest as much
as possible & let his brethren bear his burthens He said he wanted Br
Brigham to save himself for he was waring down. I feel tender toward you
& want you to live, & If I or my Brethren do wrong tell us of it
& we will repent. Br Brigham said there was not a better set
of men on the earth than the Twelve & he intended to chastize
them when they need it that they might be saved & love him & stick
by him. we all felt good to be there for the Lord was with us


~ Sunday


5th We travled to day to the springs. Here to our joy we met
with three fifties, Br A. O. Smoot hundred, and Robinson
fifty of Gen Rich company I here met with Father Woodruff &
the Company Br Smoot & many from our ward which I was truly
glad to see. After having confversation with then & getting supper
we held a meeting of all the camps G. A. Smith W. Woodruff &
& O Pratt addressed them the President then called for
a vote to tarry tomorrow & addresse them I spent the night
untill 2 oclok with Br & Sister Smoot enquiring into affairs of the Camp
business matters &c. distance of the day 26th miles


~ Monday


6th Several horses & mules gone this morning Horsman gone after
them I opened my Bevin Chest & library & found every thing
right we held a council with the officers in the morning it
was a vary cold day. In the afternoon the Twelve met in coun-
cil being eight of us and A O Smoot related to the quorum the
circumstances of John Taylor taking from John Benbow over
$300 for his sister & Br Taylors opinion was there could be no appeal
in the case to any other Authority. The Council voted that John
Benbow have a rehearing before the quorum of the Twelve if he
wished it. Also voted that the High Council in the salt lake city take
charge of the property on its arival there which was taken from
John Benbow, resolved also that there could be an appeal from
there decision to the majority of the quorum of the Twelve. I spent
the evening at Dr Richards office with the Twelve H& herd the Epistle
read, that was for the Saints in the great Bason. I spent a part of the
night with Br Smoot at his waggon writing & reading letters, councilling
&c

Page 103

~ Tuesday


7th The Camps were all busy this morning in preparing to
leave I saw my oxen that father and Armstrong has
my Durham ox was failing fast the rest looked as though they
would stand it through well. I left the Knealy Horse with Br
Smoot & the Benbow Horse with Thomas Benbow. Br Porter
wished me to keep his horse & bring him on in the spring. Br
Dewey wished me to bring him a cow for what I owed him
if I could. Br Porter wished me to help on his son Warner
if I could. Father wanted me to see Dr Cannon in winter Quarters
After the many request made I bid farewell to Br & Sister Smoot
Father Woodruff & all the Camps many wished to be remembered
to Mrs Woodruff. the camps moved on to the west & we
moved east. the springs that we camp on were near the pass
As we started it commenced snowing & was cold we passed
over the Cornelian table or valley at the Pass & travled 12 miles
& camped on the sweet water in company with John Taylors ^company^ and
also Br. Hunters company the ground was coverd with snow which
continued to fall untill evening. I took supper with Br Shirtliff
This Hundred prepared a feast for the whole Pioneer Camp & furnishe[d]
a table here in the wilderness In the most splendid manner for
one hundred persons, more than that Number eat at the table &
were filled with roast, & broiled beef, pies, cakes, buisket butter,
Peach sauce, coffee, tea, shugar & a great variety of good things
In the evening In the evening the camp had a dance but
the quorum of the Twelve met in Council at Br Shirtliff
tent & transacted such business as came before them it was
a cold frosty night. The case of Br Benbow was brought up &
he was discharged from any further obligation to Agnes Benbow
distance of the day ([FIGURE] I wrote a letter to Br Bouth) 14 miles
[FIGURE] I recieved 10 letters while on this journey


~ Wednesday


8th A cold morning but it soon grew warm & the snow melted
away we parted with the Camp & rode 12 miles & camped
on the sweet water with Br J. M. Grants hundred, I dined
with Br Neff & family & saw many I was acquainted with 12 m
Br J M Grant had buried one child on the way & his wife
lay at the point of death. We held a council in the evening & herd
brother Grant related the circumstances of the organization o[f]
the Companies which was not according to the former organiza[tion]
Br Young said he was more & more convinced that there was
a wrong with P. P. Pratt & John Taylor in these things. We also
herd Br Grant relate his interview with Col Kane which was inter[e]-
sting to us. He has the spirit of the Lord with him & is doing fo[r]
us what He can Thomas Benton is an inveterat enemy & doing
what he can against us, many things of interest was spoken off [of]
12 m


~ Thursday


[FIGURE]
9th The alarm was given early this morning that many ho[rses]
& mules were stolen. Bells were found cut off from horses
laretts cut an arrow picked up, & much indian sign the trail
was finally found to have followed the road east at about 9
oclok A company of 20 horsman put on after the trail, it
looks gloomy here, to see so many men women & child[ren]
here in the mountains with their horses & cattle stolen &
breaking down so late in the season & 30 horses being taken
by the Indians from the Pioneer Camp & 20 from the other
Camps last night which will nearly or quite cripple us

Page 104

all of our camps have remained stationary through the day. The Camps assem
bled in the evening for a meeting & was addressed By O. Pratt H. C. Kimble
& B Young O Pratt gave a description of the valley, H. C. Kimball exhorted
the saints to faithfulness & President Young gave much instruction
& council to the camp upon a variety of subjects all spoke much to our
edifycation. During the evening two of our Brethren returned who
had been in persuit of the horses & brought back five of them


~ Friday


10th We parted with our friends this morning who were going west
they started on their journey, & those of us who had not lost horses
divided with those who had & we harnessed up what teams we had
left & travled 16 miles & camped on the sweet water we met
the remainder of our Brethren returning from persuing the horses
but did not obtain any more of them, the enemy escaped with
43 of our horses we have had a plesant day but vary windy 16
16 miles


~ Saturday


11th We travled 21 miles mostly sandy road which made it hard
drawing for our horses. We saw large droves of antelope but ownly
one was killed we camped on the sweet water 21 miles
It was a warm plesant day


~ Sunday


12th Sunday we travled 21 miles & camped on the sweet water about
200 miles from fort John. Just before camping we saw a herd of
Buffalo Bulls 11 in number About one dozen footman with their
guns put after them as we had no meet in camp I mounted a
small mule with a brace of pistols & a 7 shooter pistol I was the
ownly horsman in chase we drove them into a canion of the
mountiain whare they could not get away & we surrounded [them]
the footman shot 3 times into the herd & they jumped of[f] a precipice
25 feet one broke his neck in the fall & droped dead the remai-
nder came rushing by me I gave them chase run into the herd
& drove out two of them which we killed with our pistols &
rifles so we got 3 of them which made us plenty of meat 21 m


~ Monday


13th We travled 20 miles & camped on the sweet water one mile east
of Devils gate 4 miles west of Independance rock we had strong wind
during the day I was afflicted with severe cold & headake distance 20


~ Tuesday


14th We travled 14 miles & camped on a small creek. While on
the road Br Mathews horse got away from him & went back 7 m
Br Young & Egan went back after him we stoped at the Salaratus
lake & filled our bags with salaratus it was cut out in cakes a foot thick
this lake is 3 miles east of Independance rock we had a hard storm
of rain in the mountains & considerable rain fell in the valley whare
we was the roads was vary sandy 14 mil
we saw a number of herds of buffalo to day


~ Wednesday


15th We travled 25 miles & camped at night at the springs
within 12 miles of platt river we did not get through untill
9 oclock we saw many buffalo during the day 25


~ Thursday


16th We drove the Platt river & crossed the ferry &
camped we saw many buffalo to day a bull followed my
waggon for half a mile Br Stillman went to drive him off
& he seemed determined to give him battle so we drove on
& left him & he went his way we have scarcely had any feed
for several days drive for our horses we find it better on the platt 2

Page 105

~ Friday


17th We started out on a buffalo hunt this morning but after view[ing]
the Hills & Plains we could not see any buffalo cows & as bulls we[re]
poor this season of the Year we would not kill any of them so
we returned to camp, harnessed our horses & drove 12 miles & camped
on the Bank of the Platt, grass quite good, on the way I exhamined
the grave stone of a young man who was drowned while swiming
the river in the spring He was one of the Mo emigrants going to Oregon
It is warm plesant weather (distance 12


~ Saturday


[FIGURE]
18th We travled 18 miles & camped on deer Creek which abounds with
game I walked up the Creek with my gun 2 miles I came near a large
griselly bear quarelling with her cubs I did not think it prudent to appr[o]-
ach her alone I crossed the Creek & went on to a high bluff & she
came out onto an open place whare I had a view of her I found
she was working down the creek towards the Camp, I went to Camp
& reported & Brother's Young, Kimball, Richards & Benson walked up
the creek to vew a coal mine and they came within 4 rods of the
old bear with two cubs before they saw her the old bear took after them
Br Kimball shot at her with his rifle but did not hit her Br Benson
could not get his rifle off Br Young shot at the cubs 3 times with a
7 shooter pistol knocked one of them over but he got up & followed th[e]
mother who rose a high bank whare the Brethren stood they left
the ground & retreated to a high rock, the bears then left following them
& took to the timber. Soon men & dogs were on the ground from Camp
but it became dark & the dogs would not follow & we gave up the cha[se]
I was 20 rods from the Brethren when the bear attacked them & did
not see it. There were two antilope killed to day and a Frenchman 18 mile
that was travelling in Company with us shot a vary fat buffalo cow
& distributed a good share of it in our camp which was excellent
eating there was also two buffalo bulls killed today


~ Sunday


19th Sunday. Early this morning a company of hunters crossed the
river to get some buffalo cows in a herd near by, in the chase Br
Mathews horse fell with him but did not hurt him, the others continued
on & killed one cow & two black tailed deer while this was going on
the Twelve with many others went up the creek to see if they could
get the bears but we could not find them I came in sight of 3
deer & shot 3 times at them with a coarse sighted rifles & shot over
them evry time Brother Barnham shot one of them I went a little
above & saw about 50 Antilope in a flock feeding on the plain I got
within 30 rods of one of them & shot him dead in his tracks I brought
my horse up to put him onto his back to pack him into Camp and I
laboured hard one hour before I could get the horse willing to let me
put the animal on his back I was 5 miles from camp & walked & led
my horse in the antilop was fat. We then harnessed up & drove
9 miles & camped on Fourchebaise Creek 9 miles


~ Monday


20th We travled 30 miles we crossed dry creek, little timber, & camped
Big timber, did not get through untill 9 oclok at night had great difficulty in
finding grass as the other camps had eat it off. A boy by the name of Judson
Persons
did not get into Camp but lay out 10 miles from camp. 30 miles
[FIGURE]


~ Tuesday


21st A cloudy morning. At about 9 oclock the call was made to
get up the horses. I started for the horses which was in the timber abou[t]
half a mile from Camp I got about two thirds of the way to the hors[es]
when one of the most exciting seenes wcommenced I ever witnessed
I herd the report of several ^guns^ in quick succession and herd the guard cr[y]

Page 106

Indians, Indians, And in less than a minute the timber & bluffs were lined
with mounted Indians charging with all speed upon our guard, horses &
camp they shot at two or three of the guard but missed them they
took one of the guard & tryed to carry him off on a horse. He knocked one
of them down with his fist & got away from them some of the
Brethren snaped their guns at them but they did not go off, as
soon as I herd the report of the guns, & the cry of Indians & saw
them driving off our horses & gathering thick & fast upon every
hand & being without either horse or arms I run to the camp with
all speed & gave the alarm & called upon all to gather their arms &
mount their horses. Brothers Kimball, Rockwood, Mathews, & ^99^
several others sprung onto their horses with their guns & pistols & run
to stop the horses which the Indians were taking away one party of
Indians had driven 5 or 6 Horses & Mules over the Hills Br Kimball
took after them. two Indians had gone over the Bluff with my
Horse & Mule Brother Rockwood took after them. At the same
time about 20 horses came rushing toward Camp which the Indians
had frightend Br Young with great exhertion with the assistance
of one or two other Brethren succeding in stoping them & getting
them into camp. As soon as I arived in camp I opened my trunk
took out my belt containing 8 pistol shots & harnessed it onto
myself as quick as possible put a saddle & bridle onto a broken
down horse for the want of a better one & I mounted without
spur or whip & started for the chase after my own horses. I
could not travel vary fast over the rough ground & bluffs on a
poor horse but I went as fast as I could. As soon as I left camp I
began to rise the bluffs I saw Indians gathering thicker & faster upon
every hand & began to close in between me & the camp. As I passed
by one Indian he was priming his gun. But I continued the chase
As soon as my horse & mule got over their fright & got out of
sight of camp, they tryed to return to camp & troubled the Indians
about driving them and Brother Rockwood soon came near
them and one stoped & met him when they found they were
overtaken & professed friendship the other still tried to drive off
the horses Br Rockwood fired a pistol at him & he run & left
the horses & the other Indian left also & Rockwood son soon started my
horses towards ^me^ I soon came up to his assistance & some other Brethren also
came up & assisted me in ketching them & while I was doing this near
40 Indians surrounded Br Kimball who started for the other
horses. some of the Brethren started to his assistance after I had
started for camp with my horses. Indians were also upon evry
side of me untill I got into camp I secured my horses insid the
camp and by this time about 150 warriors had gatherd to gether
close to our camp all dressed in the greatest stile for a war charge
and the old chif began to address to the top of his horse voice
the Indians and also our camp, tlelling us they were good Sioux and
they thought we were Crows or snakes. When they found they could not
get any more of our horses & 3 had been retaken which they stole they then
professed friendship there was 11 horses taken by the Indians they number
ed at about 200 warriors on the ground & well mounted & their was not over
20 of our men including the guard that was engaged in any way in stoping
the horses, or saving them, or retaking those that were stolen. Br Gould
took one Indian horse & all and another Indian brought back Thomas
Woolsays
horse which was among the stolen & exchanged him for the Ind
ians horse, this with my two horses were the ownly ones retaken during the
skirmish. But when the Indians gatherd before the camp they saw we

Page 107

as a body were armed & that we knew them & had fed them & treated
them kindly while on our way to the valley. the old Chief then proposed
that we smoke the pipe of peace. And also said that if our chief pointing
to President Young would go to their Camp they would smoke with him
& give him up the horses which his men had taken but Brother Young did
not feel well & we did not think it prudent for him to go, while in this
conversation Br Kimball who had been out on the chase after the horses
returned bare headed (having droped his hat) was accompanied by Br Benson
& in riding into camp rushed his horse through the midst of the Indians
& they fearing some treachery or that he was an enemy coming upon them
in their rear, they instantly leaped upon their horses, scattered & rushed from
the camp some runing into the creek all appeared in great fright. But as soon
as they saw there was no evil at hand they returned & took their places &
had a harty laugh at their fright. Br Kimball volenteered to accompanied
the Chief into his camp in the place of Br Young that we might get our
horses I volunteered & also Stephen Markham to go with Br Kimball
on the expedition so we three mounted our horses & set out accompanied
by a Frenchman (who could speak a little sioux language) & the Indians to
find their Camp; they told us it was one mile we travled 7 miles over
Bluffs & valleys & came in sight of their Camp some 3 miles from us
moving towards us. so we called a halt & waited for them to come up
they came & pitched about 100 lodges & their was about 600 Indians
many women & children & they brought with them about 1000 horses &
mules nearly all of them we supposed were stolen from emigrants &
& other tribes. their encampment presented quite a grand, interesting & amusing
scenery among their horses we readily discoverd ours which was stolen
the night we camped we camped with Br Grants Company we lost
49 that night which they had among their number. The old Chief called
the war Chiefs & placed them on his left hand & ourselves on his right & set down
upon the grass & filled a long pipe with Kennickenick & smoked & passed it
to his Chiefs they smoked & passed it to us we also smoked he then pointed to
us to pick out our horses which we undertook to do but found it no easy
task to pick out 7 or 8 horses scattered through one thousand others for
one or two miles up & down the creek however after a laborious search
we got all but two that was stolen this morning. We then spoke to him
about the 49 horses which they had stolen from us before, they ackn
owledged they had got the horses & gave us some incouragement of
letting us have them when they got to Laramie but would not let us
have them then they however let us have one of them ownly the
brethren brought about 3 bushels of salt as a present to him we then
returned to camp with our horses, which ended the business of the
day the Camp did not move but few rods I travled about 18 m
It rained some during the night


~ Wednesday


22nd A cool rainy morning it seemed to be the equenoxial stomr tho[u]gh
not vary tedious we thought it wisdom to leave the ground &
continue our journey we travled 18 miles & camped on Bitter
creek
we had but little grass but plenty of water 18 mile


~ Thursday


23rd we travled to day 30 miles & camped at night at the wa[rm]
spring we did not get through untill 9 oclok at night the moon
shone most briliantly we took our horses forward to the spring to
water them & then drove our waggons on the South road half a mile.
Camped for the night found some bunch grass for our horses 30 m


~ Friday


24 we rode to Laramie Br Young Kimball Benson & myself dined
with Mr Burdow we talked with him about our stolen horses
He informed us that our company with the ox teams lost every horse

Page 108

they had, but they had got every them all back but 5 He gave us some
encouragement of sending an interpeter with us to get our horses. we
crossed the Platt & pitched our camp about 3 miles from the fort
during the evening President Young called the camp together
and addressed them at some length. Appointed 10 men to go & visit the Ind-
ians
to get the stolen horses & about 40 men to follow after to assist in
case of necessity Br Young gave much instruction upon principle
& improving upon manners, temper, & interest in the general welfare of
the Church & kingdom of God distance of the day 12 m


~ Saturday


25th The Companies prepared themselves this morning to start on their
expedition. the first company of 10 men commanded y Col Mark-
ham
started by 9 oclok the other Company numbered 25 men comma
nded by Br Benson started at 10 oclock Brs Young & Kimball went to
the fort it was not long before both companies returned as they ascerta-
ined at the fort that a man had gone forward to inform them of
our coming & to have them cash up their horses. we also recieved
word in the evening that Johnson & Little had returned on the road
back, had fallen in with Comodore Stockton who was from the
Bay of Francisco accompanied with 40 men going to the States Brs
Young & Kimball made a purchase of some 40 buffalo robes
which were some damaged & unmerchantable they everaged about
$1.50 each, they also bought 3 cows at $15 each. during the afterno-
on I went out on patrool picket guard


~ Sunday


26th Sunday Brs Johnson & Little reached the fort this morn-
ing with 2 other Brethren & brought into our camp 10 horses which
they had drove on west to meet us with. we were truly glad to
see them & their hosses [horses] to as they would be some help to us
as theye Indians had taken so many of our horses that we had
as much as we could do to get along & our horses are growing
poor daily Brs Young & Kimball & others dined with Comodore
Stockton at the fort I spent the fore part of the day washing
my clothes rubed the skin of my fingers into the flesh we
harnessed up at 3 oclok & drove 3 miles & camped on the platt
many in Camp are out of both bread & meat I have divided
my bread & meat untill I am nearly out myself. 3 m


~ Monday


27th We travled 8 miles & fed & took breakfast we then travled 12 miles
& camped for the night on the bank of the Platt in the midst of
a plenty of grass & a grove of cottonwood near a good harbor for
both deer & Indians we saw several deer and a large drove of
antelope it was a warm plesant day we mowed grass for our horses
to stand by overnight 20 miles


~ Tuesday


28th we drove 8 miles & took breakfast we saw about 50 Indians mak-
ing off towards the bluffs on the South side of the river we drove
12 miles & camped on the Platt 5 miles west of scotts Bluffs 20 m
A drove of antilope run through our camp & we killed two of them


~ Wednesday


29th We passed Scotts Bluffs & took breakfast we saw a large com
pany travling on the opposite side of the river we could not tell whether
they were Indians or Capt Stockton & Co they pitched their lodges
about 10 miles back of us. we killed one Buffalo Bull to day 22 miles


~ Thursday


30th we travled 20 miles & camped on the Bank of the Platt
Mr Bewshaw the Indian traider camped on the opposite Bank. of
our Brethren got some meat of[f] him He will come over with his
Indians & surround some buffaloo & kill for uu [us] in the morning

Page 109

~ Friday


OCT 1st 1847 A warm plesant day A good share of the
Camp are out of bread & meat & they are preparing to go out
to day to surround a herd of buffalo & get some cows a company
of Indians came over to go to the hunt & expected us to go with them
2nd we were afterwards informed but we did not go untill several hour[s]
afterwards we then went in search of them but found neither
Indians or dead buffalo they came in at night & brought some
meat with them for themselves but none for us. Comodore Stockton
arived at night & camped with us or nearby & said he would like
to accompany us


~ Saturday


2nd we were informed this morning that Comodore Stockton
had changed his mind & concluded to go down on the north side
of the river Accordingly he crossed over with his troop our company
bought some half a dozen horses of Rashaw we then started on the
Journey, the Brethren killed a fat buffalo cow neare the road we
stoped the camp & dressed the meat & took it along which detained
the camp some we travled 13 miles & camped on the Platt. In the
evening Br Markham & myself went out to see if we could get any
buffalo cows we saw some of the Brethren dressing a young boll
which they had killed we could not find any cows and we would
not shoot bulls though they came so near me I stoned them off
with stones I was quite surprised to see with what expertness the buffalo
would clime the mountains & rocks they would go in places whare
horned cattle would never think of going, some steps in the rocks in the[ir]
path was more than 6 feet high in perpendicular rocks. we shot a wolf
a deer, stoned a bull & got neither of them & returned to camp 13 m


~ Sunday


3rd Sunday I lef camp as daylight was appearing in company with
Luke Johnson, for the purpose of getting ofsome meat the wolves
that had rent the air through the night with their howls was
dispersing in all directions as we passed along mounted upon our horses
they were evry size & couler of their race the beautiful swan in flocks
were floating upon the Platt which aded beauty to the scenery, we
soon saw a large herd of buffalo about 6 miles from camp & 2 from
the road. we left our horses & stole upon them the best we could
their picket guards were frighted several times we managed to quell their
fears. their is no well disiplined Army of men that are more particular to have
an old experienced guard on a closs look out than a herd of buffalo. by
going under a bank we passed there guards & lay conceled untill we
were surrounded & the main bodies of them were coming onto us with
a heavy filanxs of bulls meeting us in the face with hundreds of cows follow
ing in the rear when they approached within 2 or 3 rods of us we
thought it quite time to be up & doing even for our own safety I had a
single load in my rifle & a brace of Pistols Br Johnson had a slide
of 6 loads in his rifle we rose, he fired twice, I reserved my fire untill
he had discharged his two balls, the whole body broke & run from us. He had
killed none I fired at a Young cow put a ball through her sholdier
but she hobbled over a ridge Johnson mounted a horse & followed
a little distance after them I walked over the ridge & shot my
wounded Cow through the hart strings & lungs & she droped dead which
was the ownly one we got out of the herd we travled a few mile[s]
further & Br A Lyman killed two more & an antilope all of whi[ch]
was brought into camp & distributed large herds came near our camp
in the evening distance of the day 9 m

Page 110

~ Monday


4th Travled 8 miles & nooned the Frenchman had killed 4 fat
cows a part was divided in camp. 4 Sioux came to us, we
travled 8 miles & camped for the night we have seen immensed
herds of buffalo through the day near us distance of the day 16 m


~ Tuesday


5th This morning at day light a company of 10 men was dispatched
on foot to overtake the ox teams & stop them untill we should
come up as our horses was breaking down from a bo^a^rd stuck in
the ground we learned they had stoped 5 days for us &
killed & dryed 30 buffalo cows & were still about one week
ahead of us we travled to day 13 miles & camped opposite
Ash hollow we have constant fine beautiful weather
to journey in the grass is getting dry & not much substance
in it & our horses are failing upon it I am thoroughly
convinced that oxen are far preferable to either horses or
Mules for such a journey esspecially if they return in the
fall distance 13 miles


~ Wednesday


6th We travled 14 miles & camped on the Bank of the Platt we over-
took 2 of the Brethren who went with A Lyman & Co to overtake
the Ox teams there was 2 Buffalo Cows & 2 Calves killed to day 14


~ Thursday


7th It appeared like a cold storm gathering this morning but it
sprinkled a little & cleared off we met in the fore part of the
day Capt Joseph Walker (Capt Freemont guide through Calafornia)
also Mr Pappan the main Proprieter of Fort Laramie He was quite
displeased because Burdeau did not send an interperter & get our
horses. They informed us the Mexican war was still continued
& that 500 troops would be stationed near Winter quarters
untill spring they would then go to the Head of Grand Island
& build a fort also one at Laramie, and one on Green River
the pretention for building these forts is said to be for the purpose
of protecting the Oregon Emegrants. We sent letters by Capt Walker
to the valley via fort Bridger. He informed us that 100 miles south
of the Utah lake was an excellent country for farming purposes we
continued our journey & camped near a creek on the Platt &
obtained a letter from Wm Clayton one week ahead of us &
still going ahead 13


~ Friday


8th We travled 8 miles & nooned soon after we stoped a large body
of animals appered in sight over the Bluff we at first thought it was
a band of mounted warriors but by the aid of our glasses we found
them to be a band of one hundred or more Elk they made a splended appe-
arance they were about one mile from Camp several of us took our guns &
went after them they were as large as good sized mules I went up a
swail of tall grass the band came within 10 rods of me their horns
waveing in the wee air upbove the weeds like Rocking chairs. The Bucks
were in advanc as the does were the best this season of the year I drew
my gun to my face & waited for one to come in sight. At this instant
another man came up behind me & they saw him & broke & run he
shot at them as they run but did no good they ran near a
Frenchman who shot a doe through the neck & he fell dead the
ownly one killed out of the band though several shots were made
I got a piece of it for my supper the first Elk meat I ever ate
we travled 7 miles & camped on the Bank of the Platt we crossed
many pure streams of water to day distance 15 m


~ Saturday


9th We travled 15 miles & camped on Junktion Bluff fork we
had 2 sandy bluffs to cross to day our horses are still failing
more & more 15 m

Page 111

~ Sunday


10th Sunday The quorum of the Twelve met together & had
a prayer meeting. the camp moved 3 miles in the evening to
better feed. 3 m


~ Monday


11th we travled 10 miles & camped on the Platt above the
Junktion at 3 oclok I went to the Bluff after some Buffalo I got
into a large herd & shot a cow but did not fall but went off
with the herd. In returning to camp darkness over took me I
could not see the camp so I made for the river I had to waid
through swails for 20 rods nearly to my hips in mud & water
I passed through the midst of plenty of ducks gees swan &
wolves I saw one animal of the cat kind which I took to be
a links I struck the platt 4 miles below camp & got in weary
hungry & weary & learned that Br Egbert had killed a cow
& calf at the Bluffs & a company had gone after them &
could not find the camp had like myself to wallow through
the swails we had to raise lights on poles to light them in, one
got lost & did not get in untill 10 oclok 10 m


~ Tuesday


12th I had a question put to me by President Young what my
opinion was concerning one of the Twelve Apostles being appointed
as the President of the church with his two councellors. I
answered that a quorum like the Twelve who had been appointed
by revelation & confirmed by revelation from time to time
I thought it would require a revelation to change the order
of that quorum.* we travled 8 miles & nooned. Br Stillman
shot a buffalo cow I went with my carriage into the Bluffs
about 2 miles & we dressed it which took untill near night I shot
at 2 calves & got neither of them, we did not get into camp
untill 9 oclok at night & Br Stillman & myself worked untill
1 oclok cutting & salting up meat I got but little sleep 16 m
* Whatever the Lord inspires you to do in this matter I am with you


~ Wednesday


13th Our horses are failing more & more daily several gave out today
we travled 14 miles & camped on the north fork of the Platt we
begin to come again to some timber, some buffalo were killed
to day & large herds near us 14 m


~ Thursday


14th We travled 15 miles & camped on the Platt or rather a slew
runing into it, it was cool & windy 15


~ Friday


15th We travled 14 miles to day & camped on the Platt 14 m
nothing of particular interest occured during the day


~ Saturday


16th we travled to day out of the buffalo range & camped on the
Platt. Just before camping our Brethren who had been sent on
to over take the ox teams came to us except two continued on
they could not gain upon the teams & gave it up. Br Luke
Johnson
came near being killed by a herd of buffalo travelling
in the night. A large herd came upon him suddenly & he was
caught in the midst of thems & could not get out & the herd
was some 15 minutes passing him & the ownly way he kept them
from treading on him was by hollowing & striking & punching
them with his cane on each side of him as they came along
& they would open just wide enough for him to stand as they
passed along 15

Page 112

~ Sunday


17th Sunday as we had not meat enough to carry our Camp
to winter Quarters it was thought wisdom for a company
of hunters to return back a few miles with some waggons to
the buffalo herds & procure some more meat. Twelve of us
returned back 10 miles with three waggons A Lyman &
myself was among the number, we pitched our camp in
a little timber on a slew of water & we killed two buffalo
during the evening & brought in including buctchers
& teamsters there was about 20 of us & we were all hungry
& after cleaving the body of the meat from the
bones our company roasted the bones, & for our supper
& breakfast we used up the bones of both buffaloes it
is almost incredible what amount of roasted buffalo
meat a hungry man will eat without salt or bread &
not make him sick. there is no other meat known that
a man can eat as much of. The hump bones of a fat
buffalo roasted is the most choice eating of any meat kind
the leg bones are also filled with marrow more choice than
butter & yield a great quantity which we roasted & drank
the melted marrow without bread. We should have made
a delightful picture for an artist to have drawn the scenery
around our fireside. After all had eaten to our full satisfaction
we prepared to make our beds for the night, it was cold & blew
a perfect gale. we made choice of a thicket of willows under a bank
for our lodging place for the night we lay down on the ground & covered
ourselves over with our blankets & robes & had a good nights rest 12.


~ Saturday


18th At daylight 4 of us went to the Bluffs to exahamine the posit-
ion of the herds of buffalo, we saw many both on the Hills & flats
we returned to Camp took our breakfast of roast meat then divi-
ded & went out two by two, Luke Johnson went with me about 3
miles from Camp, we came upon 3 wild horses upon the side of the
bluff, they were splendid looking animals but the most wild
of any animals I ever saw. After returning to the Bluffs we found
that the herds on the upland were travling to the N. & N.E & the ownly
way to obtain meat was for the hunters to confine themselves to the
herds on the flat they did so & killed nine buffalo but seven of them
was dressed & brought in & wolves feasted on the other two. we got
council from Camp for us to return early in the morning & not
tary any longer, we travled in our hunt during the day 16 m


~ Tuesday


[FIGURE]
19th Early this morning we prepared ourselves to return to camp. the
company of hunters started a little before the waggons, we had got
about a mile on the way when we discoverd 7 men about 2
miles from us coming from some scattering timber we at first
took them to be Indians on foot we saw they were approach-
ing us we soon found however they were mounted white men
we then thought they were troops. they soon charged upon
us with all speed, we stood ready with our arms in hand
to meet them, but when they came up to our great surprise
& joy we found them to be the Policce of Winter Quarters led
by Brother Hosea Stout. they informed us that 16 of them had
come from Winter Quarters to meet our camp thinking we
might need some help the remainder of the party stoped at our
main camp, we stoped our teams & returned with then to
our camp ground & got the Brethren some breakfast out of the fat

Page 113

Buffalo. & while this was going on we were busy in asking many questio[ns]
about our wives & children & friends & affairs at Winter Quarters & they
were truly welcome messengers & like Angels unto us. It was truly like
good news from a far country to hear from our families & friends
once more. We travled together through the day and arived in
Camp at 8 oclok in the evening & had an interview with the rest of
the Brethren from Winter Quarters it was truly a happy meeting
I spent the evening at Dr Richards waggon reading the papers con-
cerning the Mexican War, the Ship fever making devastation
through the land, & other affairs through the United States
It was truly interesting day to me. distance 25


~ Wednesday


20th The meat we had killed, this morning was divided in
camp we then continued our journey it had much the appear
ance of a cold storm, from the no[r]th East it did rain some
during the day we travled 30 miles & camped upon grand Island
it was a tedious cold day & night we fed our horses on rushes &
Cotton wood 30 m


~ Thursday


21st We travled 16 miles & camped on wood river fed our horses
on rushes & cotton wood it has been cold to day 16 m


~ Friday


22nd We travled 14 miles & camped on the open prairie by a slew of
water I have taken cold & did not feel well to day 14


~ Saturday


23rd We crossed the country 23 miles to day over broaken sandy land
to the Lou fork of the Platt & camp on the bank of the stream
at the ford it was a warm plesant day we had nothing but dry grass
to feed our horses on at night which is poor feed to work on 23 miles


~ Sunday


254th Sunday we tried to ford the Lou fork several men crossed on hor[se]-
back there horses fell & plunged the men into the water, several
waggons followed, horses got stalled into the quick sand & waggons
had to be halled out by hand & it was given up for the day
the Camp moved down the river one mile & camped for the
day it was vary cold & windy & a snow storm at night
which made it bad on our poor weak horses we cut
down cotton wood trees & fed them on the limbs


~ Monday


25th [FIGURE] we spent about 2 hours searching for a ford
the water was cold some snow on the ground in the
morning it disappeared after the sun got up we found
a ford and all got over much better than we expect
some of the first teams got down & had to be helped
out as soon as the road was packed we went well
we travled 10 miles & camped on the platt at an old
Indian town. A company was fitted out for winter
Quarters
I wrote a letter to Mrs Woodruff 10


~ Tuesday


26th We travled to day 20 miles & camped at the old Pawnee
Missionary Station
whare we stoped going up the missionaris had
been reinstated & built several buildings during the summer but
the sioux had come down & drove them of off again we put
our horses into a small patch of oats we went through the cor[n]
fields that had been gatherd to try to glean a little corn for our
horses I worked 3 hours & got 1 1/2 bushels of ears distance of the day 20

Page 114

~ Wednesday


27th We travled 25 miles & camped whare the Paunees visited
while going up we got in late & fed on cotton wood 25 miles


~ Thursday


28th We travled 23 miles & camped on shell creek 23
Shuah Carter Woodruff was born 5 oclok this morning


~ Friday


29th We travled 25 miles & camped at the liberty pole fed on
cotton wood & rushes 25


~ Saturday


30th We travled 15 miles & camped on the east side of the Horn
we met in the afternoon & arangements was made about going
to Winter Quarters on the morrow the order of going &c 15
A company ofi about 20 waggons arivead about sundown from winter
Quarters to meet us Brothers Cutler Whitney & many other friends were
among the number & we were truly glad to meet with them they
brought corn for our horses & food for ourselves & we had quite
a feast for supper Br John Fulmer gave me an account of the
progress of the Mexican war that Gen. Scott had taken Mexico with
the loss of 17th00 men killed & many wounded & no prospect of peace
we spent a good share of the night in conversing upon a varie-
ty of subjects 15


~ Sunday


31st ^Sunday^ A Strong wind we all got our breakfast & organized for
going to Winter Quarters the company that came out to met
us went in front & our encampment followed we had a hard
days drive as our horses were worn down we travled hard
through the day when within about one mile of Winter Quarters
we made a halt and the company was drawn up in order & addressd
by President Young & dismissed we drove into the city in order
the streets were lined with people to shake hands as we drove along
each one drove to his own home I drove up to my own door & was
truly rejoiced to once more behold the face of my wife & children again
after being absent over sevenix months and having travled with the
Twelve & the Pioneers near 2,500 miles & sought out a location for the Saints
and accomplished one of the most interesting mishions ever accomplished
in the last days Mrs Woodruff had been confined with a daughter 3
days previous to my arival mother & daughter doing well all was cheerful
& happy & we felt it a blessing to again meet distance from the Horn 30 m


~ Monday


Nov 1st The first day of winter we found on our arival that the Brethren
at winter quarters had been also greatly blessed in there labours in tilling
the earth that it had brought forth in great abundance of corn buckwheat
turnips & other vegitables & the city was full of hay & surrounded with corn
I had many calls during the day. I made my aranged my business with Br
Stillman & others


~ Tuesday


2nd I spent the day with Br Benbow getting polls for a
stable & yard


~ Wednesday


3rd I spent the day in council with the quorum of the
Twelve inCouncil was given to Br Little & going east
[FIGURES] I wrote 6 letters which I sent by Col Little
to the following persons Col Kane, I F Carter,
Ezra Carter sen, Sarah B Foss, Shuah Moulton & Leonard
Hardy
we herd an interesting letter read from capt
Dan Jones of Wales. He could represent 1000 saints in
that land other letters were also read

Page 115

~ Thursday


4th I spent the day making a stable & writing


~ Friday


5th [FIGURE] I spent the day in writing & attending Council with the
Twelve Col Little & others left to day we had some rain
during the evening


~ Saturday


6th We had a cold North East rain through the day I got thoroug[hly]
wet. I held a meeting during the evening with our company organi-
zation we appointed Captains to fill the places of those who had
gone to the Bason & began to right up the company again several of the
Brethren subscribed some corn & buckwheat to assist my stock &
& family we had a good time together


~ Sunday


7th Sunday I held a meeting with our word & gave an account
of our journey to the mountains & back. The High Council met
in the afternoon & Seventies in the evening


~ Monday


8th I met in Council with the Twelve Br Hyde was with us &
gave an account of his mission in England many things was spoken


~ Tuesday


9th I met in Council with the Twelve & High Council


~ Wednesday


10th I met in Council with the Twelve & High Council Br Cutler
had a mission appointed him the Merchant & Br Wooley was present
the feelings of the council was to let all merchants come among
us & bring as many goods as they please


~ Thursday


11th I spent the day drawing corn & straw


~ Friday


12th Br Phelps returned to day


~ Saturday


13th We met in Council with the Twelve & Br Phelps gave an
account of his mission during the season & the state of public feeling
upon a variety of subjects. He obtained a press type & paper to
take over the mountains


during the evening
14th I met in Council with the Twelve & it was considerd wisdom
for the Elders & some of the Twelve to go into the vineyard


~ Sunday


14th Sunday most of the Twelve met with the congregation
at the stand & gave an account of our journey & the country
which we had sought out in the great Bason. I went over
the river & held a meeting with the Saints on the east side
of the river, & then rode 12 miles up the Boyia & held a meeting
with a neighbourhood of saints & spent the night at Br Knoltons 14 m


~ Monday


15th I returned to winter Quarters with Br Potter & met in Counc[il]
with the Twelve O Pratt introduced the subject of the standing
& rights of the President & also of the quorum, O Pratt was followed
by G. A. Smith W. Woodruff & A Lyman & council adjurnd
untill tomorrow at 10 oclok


~ Tuesday


16 Council met according to adjournment & was called a Council
of social conversation & many interesting remarks were made by
the Quorum & closed by President Young who expressed hi[s]
views at length upon the subject of yesterday, & a vote was
taken that the President shall at all times have the privl[ege]
of reproving, rebuking, exhorting & teaching at all times as [he]
shall be led by the Holy Ghost. Council dissmissed

Page 116

~ Wednesday


17th A hard rainy day I spent the time at home.


~ Thursday


18 A cold day I went over the river found some of my cattle
& returned home with 2 fish and a wild turkey


~ Friday


19th I spent the day at home


~ Saturday


20 I spent the day choreing


~ Sunday


21st Sunday I met at the stand some of the Twelve & the
congregation O Pratt iaddressed the congregation upon the
subject of the resurrection which was interesting to us all
Some had been teaching the doctrin that the resurrection
was by birth or through the womb but Br pratt showed
the folly of such a doctrin, & proved by many revelations
that the dead were raised by the power of God & the blow-
ing of the Trump of Michael the Ark Angel who was
Father Adam & that the graves of the Saints would
be opened & their bodies would come forth out of their
graves according to the visions of Ezekiel & many of the
prophets. He showed that however miracalous it might
appear unto us it was just as easy for God to perform
this work as it was to turn water into wine or make
bread without flour to feed a multitude
W Woodruff followed Br Pratt & bore testimony
to what had been said & spoke in the spirit of the Lord


~ Monday


22nd I went on the east side of the river & several Brethren donated
a load of corn to me I spent the day in picking it up I obtained
about 12 bushels of corn 2 bushels of turnips 2 bushels of buck-
wheat & brought it across the ferry


~ Tuesday


23rd Br Bills Started for Mo with my team after wheat I went
to Council with the Twelve & 70th most of the time was spent
in picking out names to go on a mission we chose 30 High priest
80 of the quorum of seventies


~ Wednesday


24th I called upon the division to assist me in getting wood
I went with my own team though it was an exceding cold day
we got up 5 loads of wood


~ Thursday


25 I spent most of the day in getting 2 bushels of buckwheat
ground for the mill was crouded to overflowing with bags
men, women, & children all (but the bags) pleading to get
grinding done


~ Friday


26 I spent the day at home choreing


~ Saturday


27th In company with G. A. Smith I crossed the river &
rode to Br Millers settlement & spent the night with Br Guy
man
& conversed with one of the Battalion who returned
with Gen Carney. He gave an account of their journey 14 m


~ Sunday


28th Sunday I met a large congregation of Saints at the
meeting house & addressed them for one hour & was
followed by G A. Smith we had a good meeting, I also
preached in the evening to Br Kelly's & had the spirit of
the Lord
I spent the night with Br Kelly 6 m

Page 117

~ Monday


29th I returned home to winter Quarters drove home som[e]
cattle for Br Bills, there was a meeting in the evening for
those who were going out preaching Br Young addressed
them I was not present 14 m


~ Tuesday


30 I met in Council with the Twelve & the Presidents of
the seventies Wm. W. Phelps & Br Jacobs was called before
the Council for taking an improper course in some things
Br Jacobs was mostly cleared & the blame fell upon Br Phelps
the decision of the president was that Br Phelps should go forth
into the waters of baptism & repent of his sins, much council
was given upon the subject. How strange it is that the Elders of Israel
will transgress the Laws of God while abroad in the vineyard
The subject of appointing three of the Twelve as the Presidency of
the Church Br Young said by persuing this course it would liberate
the quorum of the Twelve that they might go to the Nations of
the earth to preach the gospel many remarks were made upon the
subject & council adjourned


~ Wednesday


Dec 1st 1847 I spent the day at home choreing


~ Thursday


2nd In company with the quorum of the Twelve I crossed
the river & rode to the miller settlement Br Richards and
myself spent the night with Henry Miller 12 m


~ Friday


3rd. The Twelve met in conference with the Saints on the east
side of the river according to previous appointment. President
Young addressed the meeting & was followed by J. A. Smith A Lyman
& W. Woodruff in the forenoon; & in the afternoon by H C Kimb[all]
& B Young. And conference adjourned untill next day
the most of the twelve spent the night at Br Daily's
Elder Appleby arived in our mids from Philadelphia & spent
the evening with us & gave us much information concerning the
wars & the state of the Nations & brought us a card of gold pens one
for each of the Twelve as a present from Col Kane. He also gave
an account of the state of the Churches in the east. We also
learned that many who had been enemies to the church were dead
Jackson who had a hand in the death of the Prophet died in
Mexico with the black vomit Mr Eagle is also dead, we were informed
that Gen Harding, Maj Warren & Capt Morgan with half of the
Quincy grays were killed in the Mexican war.
O Pratt & myself spent the night at Br Guymans


~ Saturday


4th Met in conferance according to adjournment G A. Smith addressed
the meeting a few moments but the House was so crouded we
could not do business President Young also made some remarks &
the Conference was adjorned for 3 weeks & the Conference resol[ve]d
to go to immediately & build a large log meeting House for the peop[le]
to meet in Henry Miller was appointed the committee, & about 200
gave their names to go to work immediately at it, it was to be built
about 65 by 40 in the clear but was to be under the direction of the
Twelve.


After meeting the Twelve rode to Br Chase & spent the
night, I spent the night with Br Isaac Behannan & Elie Chase 1[5]


~ Sunday


5 Sunday We rode to Br O. Hydes & spent the day & night we had
[FIGURES] an interesting time we had a good feast & went into
council, & Br Brigham Young expressed his feelings

Page 118

concerning the organizing of the Church & appointing a first
Presidency this subject lies with wait upon my mind I have
been stired up to do this by the spirit of the Lord. He wished all
of the quorum present to express their feelings upon this subject
begining at the oldest & each one of the following persons expre-
ssed their feelings in rotation.
H. C. Kimball O. Hyde, O. Pratt W Richards W. Woodruff G A. Smith
A. Lyman & E T Benson, & many interesting remarks were
made by the various individuals who spoke. & we were
followed by President Young, after which Orson Hyde moved
that Brigham Young be the President of the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter Day Saints & that he nominate his two
Councellors & they form the three first Presidency seconded
by W. Woodruff & carried unanimously. President Young
nominated Heber C Kimball as his first counceller seconded
& carried unanimously President Young nominated Willard
Richard as his second councellor seconded & carried unanimously
many appendages to this subject was conversed upon with
much interest we then adjourned, wente into Br Hydes
house & had a feast of pie & strawbury wine & retired to rest


~ Monday


6th We went into Council this morning several subjects were
conversed upon one was our posterity in this world & the osprigs [offspring]
of immorta Celestial & resurrected beings in the world to come
President Young remarked that our children in this life did not
look just like their parents but was a variety in looks &c & the
osprings of Celestial beings were spiritual bodies


Wm. W. Phelps was cut off from the Church for breaking the
laws of God.


It was decided in Council that if a man lost
his wife he was at liberty to marry again whare he pleased and
was justifyed.


Father John Smith was appointed by the
quorum of the Twelve As the first patriarch over the whole Church
President Young said the Twelve were at liberty to publish papers
in any part of the world whare they should be or take the
best course to spread the work, the twelve should superintend
the printing whareveer they were. And If the Twelve were going
abroad it would be well to ordain Elders out of new members
that were baptized & take with them to preach & there should
ownly one of the Twelve go to one place & call seventies to
their assistance. Our counsel adjourned. E T Benson &
myself rode to Elder Greens branch & attended meeting B Clapp
& Joseph Young preached W. Woodruff & E T Benson followed them
we had a good meeting, we spent the night at Br Carters 10 m


~ Tuesday


7th We rode [to] Br Dailys 3 miles it rained, hailed, & froze, which made
bad travling we found the brethren building the meeting House
in the afternoon in company with B Young H C Kimball W.
Richards
I rode through a cold hail storm to the ferry & had some
difficulty in getting across the river 16 mils
I spent the night at home


~ Wednesday


8th [FIGURE] I went into the woods with Br Benbow & got a load of
willows I spent the evening at the Dr office hearing letters
read


~ Thursday


9th I met in Council with the Twelve & the presidency of the
Seventies John D Lee was brought up for trial for improper
conduct with his family After hearing the testimonie upon the

Page 119

subject President Joseph Young reproved Br Lee vary sharply for
trying to cover his faults & justify himself in his errors for it w[as]
evident he had done wrong President Brigham Young backed up
Br Joseph Youngs reproof, & reproved Br Lee himself & required h[im]
to call his family together and to settle his difficulties [FIGURE]
I was in council with Br Young in the evening and part of the evening
I spent at his house


~ Friday


10th I killed a pig weighing about 150 lbs, & finished our stables


~ Saturday


11th I spent the day at home choping wood


~ Sunday


12th Sunday I preached in our ward at Br Pulsiphers & spent
the evening at Br W. Richards


~ Monday


13th I bought of Br Wild 220 lbs of pork & cut it up & salted it down


~ Tuesday


14th I spent the day at home & had a prayer meeting in our school
house


~ Wednesday


15th I spent the day at home choreing


~ Thursday


16th I met in Council with the Twelve & High Council the subject of
tighing [tithing], taxation, Policce &c was brought up President Young rema[rked]
that there was a great difference between the tighing & taxes for
tighing was a standing law of God for one tenth was required
of evry man & woman who was the head of the family & that
would probably [be the law] of the Church untill the coming of Christ but
taxes was leved according to circumstances


~ Friday


17th I spent the day at home


~ Saturday


18th I went into the woods with several Brethren to get wood
we got 4 loads


~ Sunday


19th Sunday I met in Council with the Twelve & herd the epistle of
the Twelve read & other letters in the afternoon we met with the
High Council. during the evening I met with the seventies I addre[ssed]
them in the spirit of the Lord Br Dykes spoke to the meeting con[cer]-
ning his own affairs


~ Monday


220th I spent the day at home


~ Tuesday


21st [FIGURE] I met in council with the quorum of the Twelve we herd
the epistle read & corrected we then went into council with the
Presidency of the Seventies and Milo Andrews was brought upo[n]
trial for abusing his wife turning her away & marrying anoth[er]
Br H. C. Kimball addressed the Council & said that he had been to
the mountains & got an endowment & felt it in his bones & w[ant]-
ed to talk a little, he said the day had come when iniquity could
not be harboured in the Church, and men because they belong to my fa[mily]
or Br Brigham Youngs family will not be screened in wickedness I w[o]-
uld even turn over to the law of God sons out of my own loins if they
done wrong, will I suffer iniquity to go unpunished in others more th[an]
in my own sons? I tell you nay. Br Andrews has been adopted into
family but let the law of God have its demand upon him if it takes hi[s]
head off for a man had better ienter into life maimed than into
Hell with all his members. The accusations against Br Andrews
were then read some he acknowledged to & some were proven
against him after which President Young addressed the

Page 120

meeting in an interesting manner & gave good teaching. He said a
man by seeking that which did not belong to him would loose
that which he seemeth to have as in this case Br Andrews by
unlawfully marrying this woman is now left without any wife
there is no Elder in this church [who has] any right to marry a woman to
a man who has a living wife, many men act like fools as soon as
they get an idea that women should obey their husbands & be passive in
their hands they will go to the woods & get a bundle of sticks & com-
mence whiping their wives to make them obey them in the first
place a husband should be a righteous man a man of God & rule his
houshold in righteousness & govern his wife with kindness & love & not
with a rod, club, or his fist, his conduct to his wife should be such
that she will love him with all of her heart and he should pray to
God that his wife & children which are jewels given him might be
saved & not taken from him that not any thing need be lost which
the father hath given him. He said that many men through their con-
duct would have taken from them that which they had & given to another.
He said that when a man had a jewel given to him he ought to prize it &
treasure it up & take good care of it & in process of time other jewels
might be given him of the Lord, but he should not undertake to
steal them for he could not keep them, and a man should not
be in a hurry to obtain any blessing or exhaltation that is not for
him & when he has proved himself faithful in all things before
God there is no good thing that will be withheld from him in
time or Eternity & many other good instructions were given


President Joseph Young followed with interesting remarks
& gave it as his opinion that Br Andrews ought to be cut off from
the Church for adultery, most of the quorum of the Twelve
spoke upon the subject also the presidents of the Seventies after
which it was moved & carried that Milo Andrews be cut off
from the church for adultery. it was also moved and carried
that the woman be cut off from the Church fromor adultery. It
was moved & carried that they both be left in the hands of the
Presidents of the Seventies meeting then adjurned and the
Twelve went into the recorders office & met in council


~ Wednesday


22nd I met in council with the Twelve, the Epistle was read
prepared for the Press some other letters read


~ Thursday


23rd I went over the river with the quorum of the Twelve and spent
the night at Council Point we had a meeting I addressed the meeting
and was followed by Brother Joseph Young we had a good meeting 10 m


~ Friday


LOG TABERNACLE CONFERENCE


24th This conference was opened at 10 oclok according to appointment, prayer
by O. Pratt W Woodruff addressed the meeting upon the object of calling
the conference & was followed by O Pratt upon the same subject, much
interesting teaching & instruction was given through the day by a number
who addressed the meeting. The Brethren on that side of the river during
the last three weeks had built a Log Tabernacle for this & other conferences
65 feet by 40 we felt that they had done a great work in so short a time.
After doing the business of the day the quorum of the Twelve spent the
evening in council at Br Richards I spent the night at Br Guymans
The conference was addressed to day by Presidents Young &
others of the Twelve upon a variety of subjects such as emegrating
to the west, the Brethren on the east side of the river, to assist President
Young & others on the west side with teams & waggons, much interesting

Page 121

teaching & council was given through the day, and their was also
preaching in the evening. The Twelve met in council in the eveni[ng]
& spoke of appointing the first Presidency during the conference and
also named several men to fill up the quorum of the Twelve but it was
not decided who should be the men to fill up that quorum


~ Sunday


26th Sunday the Conference assembled at 10 oclok and was addressed by
Elder Apbleby in an interesting manner upon the political state of
the world the gathering of the Jews at Jerrusalem & many other
interesting things. He was followed by Br Kimball Lyman Benson &
others who spoke in the power of God, during the evening the meeting
was adressed by Professor Pratt & W. Woodruff both had the
spirit of speaking we numbered the people & they were found to
be about 800 in the House. I spent the night as usual with Br Richards


~ Monday


27th A larger number than ever assembled this morning. About 1000
souls got into the House Elder Kimball addressed the meeting this
morning in the Power of God rebuked wickedness and sin & warned
all to repent of their transgressions. The names of the seventies was
then called over and President Young remarked that it would not
be necessary to put them or be organized into quorums while here but
remain in a body under their presidents untill they arived at the
valley, that while any quorum of the seventies of twelve were full
though they might be scattered to the fore corners of the earth
would not be filled up in Zion or any place but when there was
a vacancy by death or aposticy then the vacancy might be filled
we learned from Presidents Youngs teaching that it was necess[ary]
to keep up a full organization of the Church through all time
as far as could be at least the three first Presidency quorum
of the Twelve Seventies, and Patriarch over the whole Churc[h]
&c so that the devil could take no advantage of us.


The subject was discused or spoke upon by O. Pratt concerning
the appointing of the first Presidency and Patriarch over
the whole Church others spoke upon the subject. It was then
moved secon[d]ed and carried universally that Brigham Young be the
President over the whole Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
President Young then nominated Heber C. Kimball to be his first
Councellor which was seconded and carried unanimously
President Young then nominated Wilard Richards as his second
councellor which was seconded and carried universally
It was then moved seconded and carried universally that
President John Smith be the Patriarch over the whole Church
Much important and interesting instruction was given upon
these and other subjects after which among which was the
subject of the resurrection spoken upon by President Young
He said there was nothing more to be learned by the people upon
the subject than what was written the subject was made
plain in the Bible and other revelations & it was not a subject
that we wanted to use & at the present time as we had not come to
the resurrection But there ^was^ no person except a resurrected body
who held the Keys of the resurrection. Michael the Ark Angel
or Ancient of Days who was Father Adam held the Keys of the
resurrection.


The Conference adjourned untill 10 oclock
on the 6th day of next April.


during the evening the people met with the band of music
at the tabernacle & spent the evening in music, singing &
dancing

Page 122

~ Tuesday


[2]8th In company with the Twelve I crossed the river on the
ice & returned to winter quarters I was nearly sick, when I
reached home & had been was nearly all the when time at confer
ence 12 m


~ Wednesday


29th I attended a council with the Presidency & High cou
ncil
and herd the report of Br Cutler who had been on a mis
[s]ion to the South his report was interesting it showed the Lord
was opening doors for the further progress of the work in the
earth esspecially among the Lamanites. may the Lord hasten
the work.


The Brethren put up my chimney to day which
had follen down


~ Thursday


30th I spent the day at home choreing Br Alger brought me a
load of corn to day, it was a damp wet day Br Wild spent
the evening with me


~ Friday


31st [FIGURE] This is the last day of 1847 I went to the mill and got
8 bushels of wheat ground I had an interview with President
Young in the morning upon a variety of subjects among which was the
object of going east on a mission. we were introduced to Mr Mulho-
land from Nauvoo and herd letters read from there Help me keep thy commandments O Lord

Thus ends annother Year which has been interesting and importa
nt year to the Saints. The Twelve Apostles with their brethren, one
hundred and fourty three souls as pioneers have made a journey more
than one thousands miles to the Rocky mountains and sought out a
place for a city, a stake of Zion, and a Temple of the Lord that the saints
may have a place to flee to while the indignation of the Lord passeth
over the nation that hath driven them out. Our Journey to the mountains
& back again to Winters Quarters with horse, mule, and ox teams has been over
2000 miles more than half of the journey we have had to make new roads
& with all of our exposures, sickness, & dangers not a human life has been lost
but all returned in safety and what is more singular still, not a horse mule
ox, cow, or calf was lost either going or returning except 2 horses shot by disobeying
council. The blessing of the Lord has been great upon us as a people during
the past year in all the various portions of the Camp of Israel. we have
now found a place to build a Stake of Zion whare the people can gather
together & build up Zion. The past year has shown forth the fulfi-
llment of Prophecy in the wars, rumours of wars, famins, pestilence,
distress of nations with perplexity and in many of the signs of the
times. The United States in their wars with the feble Nation of
Mexico have involved themselve in a debt of one hundred and fifty
millions of dollars besides the loss of twenty five thousand men
& twice that number to Mexico and their own expenses in the war, the
famine has raged in Irleland, the cholera through Europe, the breaking
of banks & merchants has distressed the people in England. The Baron
Rothchilds the rich Jew has become a member in the British Parliament
which is a new eary in the History of the Jews, & they the Jews are
gathering home to Jerrusalem by thousands what 1848 will bring to
pass in the History of the Church and Kingdom of God time must
determin and also in the History of the Nations of the Earth. May
the LORD hasten the gathering of Israel & the building up of Zion for
Jesus Christ Sake Amen
The following page contains a synopsis of my travels during the year of 1847

Page 123

[FIGURE]


I Travelled 2619 Miles


The above distance was mostly from
Council Bluffs across the Rocky mountains
to the great salt lake, great Bason, North
America, and back agains


I attended with the Twelve 56 Councils


With the High Council 15 Councils


I Preached to the Saints 33 times


I Baptized 3 Persons


I Confirmed 122 Persons


I Ordained 1 Bishop


Of the Quorum of Seventies 1


I Blessed 12 Children


I Administered unto 30 Sick Persons


I Wrote 14 Letters


I Recieved 6 Letters

Page 124

[FIGURE]


WILLFORD WOODRUFFS


JOURNAL


FOR


1848

Page 125

~ Saturday


Saturday January 1st 1848
During the evening in company with Mrs Woodruff I went to
Br Wilds to spend a new years evening


~ Sunday


2nd Sunday I met with the saints in our ward I addressed them
& was followed by Br Pulsipher Br Kington arived from garden
grove
& spent the night with me


~ Monday


3 I went with Br Kington to the office to meet in council
with President Young but he was sick & not able to attend
and we returned home


~ Tuesday


4th President Young was still sick yet we met in Council
with him at his room the affairs of Garden groves was
talked over & the Twelve nominated Brs Scoval & Groves
to go with Br Kington & settle the affair during the evening
we had a meeting at the school house Br Kington spoke was
followed by Brothers Pulsipher, Porter, & several of the sisters
the meeting then closed by a spirited address from W.
Woodruff Br Kington spent the night with me


~ Wednesday


5th I spent the day at home writing


~ Thursday


6 I spent the day at home writing


~ Friday


7 In company with Mrs Woodruff I met with the quorum
of the Twelve & their Ladies to partake of a feast composed
of two large fat wild turkies & other rich food prepared by
Samuel Wooley we had an interesting feast & conversation
upon a variety of subjects among which was the spirit of God
and Holy Ghost, it was remarked that the spirit of God enli-
ghteneth every man that cometh into the world and when a
man was baptized for the remission of sins & hands laid upon
him for the gift of the Holy Ghost that blessing was sealed
upon him & tarried with him if he was faithful & as light
would recieve light & truth embrace truth the more of the
Holy Ghost a man had the more power he would have & the
more of the Holy Ghost would still cleave unto him and
other subjects were spoken off we spent the evening and
returned home


~ Saturday


8th I spent the day at home. In the evening I went to the
council House with Brs Kington & Benbow & the Twelve
& herd the Presidents message of the U.S. read which
took two hours & a half to read


~ Sunday


9th Sunday In company with Br Kington I went to Br
Phineas Richards & preached to the people I spent the evening at home


~ Monday


10th I spent the day at home. The following is the address
of Br W. J. Appleby Recklesstown ^P.O^ Binlington Co N.J.


~ Tuesday


11th I spent the day drawing wood and in the evening attended
the ward meeting

Page 126

~ Wednesday


12th I took my family out to a ride in the carriage I rode through
through the great corn field 2 1/2 miles through it saw large flocks
of prairie chickens I shot one and brought it home 10 th


~ Thursday


13th Luther Scammans address is Lamoille, Bagurau ^Bureau^ Co Ill
He is situated 14 miles from Peru the termination of the canal
100 from Chicago 150 from Nauvoo,
[FIGURE] I wrote him a letter to day informing him that
we should probably visit him in the spring on our
way east. I also wrote a letter to Br Apbleby


~ Friday to ~ Saturday


14th & 15 th I spent the time at home choreing


~ Sunday


16th Sunday I took my wife & children into my carriage
& crossed the river on the ice and rode to the Log tabernacle
to attend the meeting, which opened at 11 oclock there being present
B. Young G. A. Smith & W Woodruff of the Twelve. G A Smith
opened the meeting by prayer and W Woodruff addressed
the assembly upon the subject of their being one in all things
& the gathering of Israel, building up of Zion, &c. And was
followed by President Young who made many good rema
rks [FIGURE] He said the Lord would give his spirit to teach and instruct
from the private member to the President of the church, but
he will never give any man or woman his spirit to dictate
& direct his file leader, he related an anacdote of a female
runing a race upon a great wager lost it by stoping on the way
to pick up a Jewel.


He said truly that if we were not one we
were not the Lords.


In speaking of the duties of the Priesthood
he said if this people holding the Priesthood should settle down
& go to cultivating the earth & entirely neglect the preaching
of the gospel the earth would open & swallow them up &
hide them from his sight.


The whole day & evening
was taken up in teaching & council


~ Monday


17th The fore part of the day was taken up in business & teach
ing & council the spirit of the Lord was with the people
Among other subjects President Young s[p]oke upon the subject
of danceing & said that danceing was not an ordinance of the
gospel or of the House of the Lord. But the organization of man
is such that it requires a variety, singing stimulates the whole
system & the mental mind to such a degree that they want to
dance, this is well enough in its place, every thing that is calcula
ted to fill the soul with Joy is ordained of God & is prpoper for
the Saints if they acknowledge God in all things & do not sin
but dont mingle with the wicked world & sin but serve the
Lord with it. And the ownly lawful place to dance is in a tem-
ple or a place of endowments, you will never see any music
or danceing in Hell neither Joy or gladness will be there but
these things will be in Heaven many other interesting rema-
rks were made.


The afternoon & evening was spent in music and danceing
the old grey headed man, with the young man, maiden and
children went forth in the dance together & praised the Lord
in the dance and all was peace and harmony

Page 127

~ Tuesday


18th The fore part of this day was also spent in teaching
& giving council, the Twelve occupied most of the time
Two petitions were presented to the meetings for signitures
one for a county in the Potawattame tract of land in Iowa
and the other for a Post Office and the People were signing
them daily Br Henry Miller and others were appointed to go to
the Legislature of the State of Iowa to petition for the county &
$30 were raised by the people ^to^ bear their expenses many interesting
speaches were made by the people


The afternoon & evening of this day was also spent in singing
music & danceing, and at the close of the evening this
congregation were dismissed & other branches of the church
were to take it tomorrow as all could not get into the House
at the same time


~ Wednesday


19th We had a new & full congregation to day, the fore
part of the day was taken up as usual with teaching, instruction
& council & the spirit of the Lord was with us. the after noon
& evening was as usual spent in singing, music, & dancing, square
Merit, the Soux Indian agent, A Major, capt & Lieut. from Fort Carney
were present and seemed to be pleased with the appearance of
things


~ Thursday


20th This is the last day of our meeting with the Saints
at the Log tabernacle, the congregation was addressed at some
length by Br G A. Smith upon a variety of subjects giving advise
to the saints not to locate on the river bottom but go to the bluffs
& north whare there is a plenty of timber & open farms whare
there is plenty of room also advised them to pay their tithing
& not admit of making use of ardent spirits, & spoke upon
other subjects & was followed by W. Woodruff who backed up
the testimony of Br Smith after which several business matters
were taken up.


The afternoon & evening as usual was spent in singing, music,
& dancing at the close, President Young addressed the meeting
in an interesting manner, and said he wished the Saints to
get so quick in their understandings that when they herd his
tex that they might know his whole sermon without his preaching
it or stoping to explain evry item. And his text was now let
the Saints stop dancing for if you get up parties all over the
country here and go to danceing sin and iniquity will grow out
of it but all has been right here thus far I have watched you
& all has been in quiete & peacable & good order & the spirit of the
Lord has been here. And the President dissmissed the people
pronounceing the blessings of God upon the people. I with several
other of the brethren spent my time with Br Richards who
was vary kind in entertaining the Saints


~ Friday


21st We all returned home to our dwellings in Winter Quarters
it had been exeeding warm & plesant during our whole visit
at the Log tabernacle meeting & we found all well on our return
home. Br's Babitt, H. Kimball & Snider arived from Nauvoo
& returned to Winter Quarters with us & brought some papers
giving an account of the wars & distress of nations with famine
Pestilence & Judgment

Page 128

~ Saturday


22nd I spent the day at home choreing


~ Sunday


23rd Sunday I preached to the saints in my ward was followed
by Brs Pulsipher & Porter & we had a good time and in the eve
ning I went to the Council House and met with a large assembly
Professor Pratt addressed them quite lengthy upon asstronomy
philosophy, and various principles which he had studied much upon
and also read a lengthy document which he had written which
was highly interesting to us. He advised the seventies to devote all
of their leasure moments to reading & study & fulfill the commandments
which says we should treasure up wisdom & knowledge by faith & by
study out of the best books that we may have a knowledge of things
in heaven & on earth of kingdoms & countries things which are at home
& abroad, the wars perplexities of nations &c In the lecture given by
Professor Pratt he intirely overthrows many of the systems of modern
phylosiphers & asstronomiers & modern reasoning in many respects, to
overthrow the gentile Christian Argument, "that God made the Heavens
Sun, moon, & stars and the earth & all that in them are out of nothing
in six days He said that it was admitted by modern phylosophers that
stars had been discoverd through telescopes so remote from the earth
that it would take thirty thousand years for the light of it to reach
this earth though it should travel at the rate of two hundred thousand
miles per second, so it must have been in exhistance 24000 years
before this earth was formed. He overthrows the principle of Immate-
riality & clearly shows that God, Angels, spirits, are material as well as
men, beasts, vegitables minerals, &c that matter is eternal & infinite
without end or bounds & that space is infinite & without bounds or end
that matter, the elements, intelligence were not created neither
indeed can be, & were from all eternity & that God formed the
Heavens & earth out of unorganized materials or matters which
did exhist in some form & were not made out of nothing. In
speaking of the spirit of God he remarked to me that the Holy
Spirit that was through all things, and round about all things, & that
governed & controlled all things are intelligent atoms the same as God is
composed of hence it is called the spirit of God, & he had no dobt
but that there were some of these atoms combined in all the miner-
al, vegitable, & animal Kingdoms & by the aid of those intelligent
atoms were enabled to abide the law by which they were governed
many other interesting principles were presented by Professor Pratt
when he closed I followed him and exhorted the people to listen
to his council & improved their time I also advised the Camp
to hold meetings in each ward on Sunday & prayer meetings at
least one evenings in each week that if they would pray more
they would have much less spirit of complaining among them I
remarked that the spirit of the Lord & the spirit of the
devil would not dwell together but a short time in the same
person or tabernacle but one would govern & the other leave
I also warned the people against judging any matter whatever
untill they herd both sides of the question for in most all
cases any person would be apt to give a wrong judgment by merely
hearing one side of the question. And that the Elders could
not be in possession of any to much truth upon any subject
whatever in order to magnify there callings among the nations
of the earth for if they should be called to stand before Kings
Princes, Asstronomiers Phylosophiers & the learned of the earth
they would find use for all there knowledge

Page 129

~ Monday


24th I met in council withe the Twelve & High Council & herd
a charge prefered by the Policee against E. D Wolley for making
use of sedicious language against the Authorities of the Church
the letter of the accusation was sustained against Br Wolley
but it was not supposed by any that the spirit of sedition
was in his heart. It proved to be an interesting meeting as muc[h]
teaching & instruction was drawn out of the Presidency High
Council
, Twelve &c. Br Wooley in his plea expressed his
feelings that the Hickery Clubs carried by the policee, & the council
for Bishops to preside over any parties in the place to keep order,
and that the Policee would not suffer a man to let his own cattle
get into his own crops to destroy them were oppressive to his
feelings. President Young said he wanted to speak upon the
spirit of the thing with Br Wolleys, that the things that oppress
Br Wolleys feelings would have no effect upon him if all had
been right with him but he had got the spirit of the world & did
not feel right. Said that the law was for the unruly & that
it must rest upon good men in order to reach the unruly &
transgresser. many gave their opinion upon the subject
Br Wooley made his confession that he had spoken in an im-
proper manner in a moment of passion he was forgiven by the
council & all was settled. W. Woodruff in his remarks said
he would advise evry individual not to make any decision or give
any judgment or opinion upon any subject whatever untill
they herd both sides of the question, Council was dismissed
& we returned home. Brs Pratt & Levi Richards & myself
visited Br Henman's family to administer to them for the whole
family was sick & had been troubled with evil spirits we
prayed with this family & laid hands upon 7 that were
sick of the household the spirit of the Lord was with us
& we rebuked the sickness & commanded the evil spirits
to depart & they recieved a blessing upon the family. Br's
Pratt & Richards returned to my house & spent several
hours in conversing about science, Phylosophy, Astronomy,
and a variety of things of interest


~ Tuesday


25th We met in Council with the Twelve & High Council
A. Babit, H. Kimball, & John Snider they made a report of
affairs at Nauvoo & recieved some council President Young
did not wish the temple to be sold and a number of other
things were spoken of some little difference of feelings settelled
during the evening I attended meeting in our ward


~ Wednesday


26th I spent the day at home reading, writing, choreings &c I spent
the evening at Br Neff.


~ Thursday to ~ Friday


27th 28th I spent the days at home choping wood


~ Saturday


29th Presidents Young & Kimball called upon me at my house
a little while this morning the first time that Br Young has
been into my house since we returned from the mountains
we conversed together a short time we then all went to
council together with the High Council & spent several hours
& then dispersed

Page 130

~ Sunday


30th Sunday we had one of the most terrible storms we have
had for several Years it has been exeeding worm for many days
the wind blew hard from the North commenced raining & freezing
then snowing & exeeding cold & the storm lasted through the
day and night which blew snow into many houses it was also
tedious upon cattle. Mrs Woodruff was quite sick through the night
& kept her bead through the day


~ Monday


31st The storm abated in the latter part of the night & the
sun arose plesant this morning I spent the day at home


~ Tuesday


Feb 1st I spent the day at home choreing


~ Wednesday


2nd I spent the day reading & writing


~ Thursday


3rd I attended a feast prepared by the defenders of Nauvoo or those
who were in the Battle of Nauvoo most of those who composed
the assembly were individuals who were in that memoriable
action it was ascerted that there was not more than 100 saints
at any one time in the fight while the mob that was fighting
agaist the Saints numbered from 800 to 1000 and their was
but three of the Saints killed and one or two slightly wounded
while there was several waggon loads of the mob killed & many
wounded & the enemy driven from the field, but the Lord
was with the Saints & saved their lives. The Saints wore a
read badge on the left arm to distinguish them from their
enemies in the battle, they wore the same to day at the feast at
the opening of the performences President Kimball deliverd an
address upon the subject of the Battle of Nauvoo & was followed
by Col Johnson, after which their was feasting singing music &
some dancing. A figure was got up called the Battle of Nauvoo
whiched was danced & the Saints felt to praise the Lord for
their deliverance


~ Friday


4th I spent the day at home reading the Book of Enoch


~ Saturday


5th I went into the woods with several of the Brethren & choped
loaded & brought home five loads of wood


~ Sunday


6th Sunday I preached to a congregation of Saints in Br Phineas
Richards
ward & had a good time


~ Monday


7th I spent most of the day reading I read a pamphlet called
the voice of truth, containing the Prophet Joseph Smith
views of the powers & policy of the government of the United
States, and corressppondence with Gen James Arlington Bennett,
appeal to the green mountain Boys, correspondence with, John
C. Calhoon
, and Henry Clay, a friendly hint to Missouri, and an
interesting sermon from President Smith. These letters &
writings are of much interest & show the spirit of the tim-
es & the mighty rebuke of wicked men by that great, good,
& wise Prophet Joseph I was much edifyed in reading it
I spent the evening in reading the book of Jasher & was
edifyed with that Br Benbow & myself laid hands upon a
sick youth


~ Tuesday


8th I spent the day at home during the meeting at our school
house in the evening I gave a synopsis of my meditations
concerning our duties as a people

Page 131

~ Wednesday


9th I have been troubled for several days with a head ake
I finished reading the Book of Jasher & found it to be
an interesting work. It speaks of the great victories
the Twelve Patriarchs the sons of Jacob accomplished in
their Battles with their enemies in consequence of their great
faith in God and of Joseph career in Egypt & many other
interesting things


~ Thursday


10th [FIGURE] I made President B Young a present of fine
blue broad cloth which I got in England I spent a part
of the day with Br Young I walked with him from the
office to Br Warner Porters whare President Young administ[ered]
in the ordances of the house of the Lord. I read several papers
from the eastern states which gives an account of the dredful
famine in Ireland more than 130,000 persons have died in the
famine and apparently the destress has but just began, also the
the breaking of the banks and large firms throughout England
which has caused a great panic & much perplexity throughout
those nations the United States are still at war with Texas
& much division in the government concerning the war


~ Friday to ~ Saturday


11th & 12th I still suffer with pain in the head I spent these
days at home reading writing & choreing


~ Sunday


13th Sunday It is the most beautiful & warm weather that
[FIGURE] I ever saw in the winter time. The Camp of of the
Saints met at the stand for a meeting to day meeting opened
by singing, & prayer by W. Woodruff, the meeting was then
addressed by President Kimball then addressed the meeting
and said that he wanted to give an exhertation and a word of
caution and after reproving the saints said many flattered
themselves that they were going to lean upon others to save
them without doing any thing themselves but they will
get disappointed, for to bring up a figure he said you migh[t]
graft ever so many sproughts into a tree if they did not adhear
to the tree they would remain there dead sticks stick-
ing out of the tree they would be dead themselves, not
bring forth fruit, & do the tree no good but ownly scar
it up, & those scars would remain untill the dead sticks
were broakke off & the skcar healed over or other grafts
put in that would bring forth fruit. So it was with all
who leaned upon others to save them & would not
harken to their council & take their advice & no man
can save them if do not save themselves and many
other remarks of Interest he made.


W. W. Phelps then read the V chapter of Math V chapter of Math as he
had translated it from the greek


W Woodruff advised the people who were going to
settle on the east side of the river not to settle on the
bank or in the bottoms so that the first flood need
not wash them into the Mo river.


Meeting was dismissed
after which in company with Mrs Woodruff I went to
Br Pulsiphers and soon Presidents Young & Kimball came
& attended to sealing four couple in matrimony, we had
a feast of spruice beer & cakes on the occasion

Page 132

during the evening I attended the meeting of the Seventies
being 3 of their presidents present, Joseph Young Z. Pulsipher
A. P. Rockwood the House was crouded to excess the meeting
was opened by singing & prayer. And was then addressed
by A P Rockwood who spoke upon the government of
children that Parents ought to set a good exhample before
their children & not nickname them but call them by
their proper name for the way that Parents set their
children going in life they are apt to go through & if they
start with Jim, Jo, & Pall, they are apt to go through
life so,.


Br Pulsipher followed & made many
interesting remarks. And he was followed by President
Joseph Young who reproved them in the spirit of the Lord
against the spirit of dancing & warned them to forsake all
sin & be faithful in all things He spoke in the spirit and power
of God
feeling the responsibility he was under when he closed
his remarks W. Woodruff arose and said that should
I say that I did not desire to address the Seventies I should do
dishonor to my own feelings for I do desire it at this time.
All who know my course when I have been at head quarters with
the Presidency either with Joseph, Brigham, or others of the twelve
know that I have never put myself forward to preach or teach
the people, why hath it been so, because I have had file leaders
between me and God whose business it is to lead teach & instruct
the inhabitants of Zion and I have felt it more my duty to sit
& hear while with them at head quarters than to put myself
forward to teach yet when I have been called upon to speak
I have endeavoured to do the best I could, but when I have
been abroad in the vineyard I have had the spirit of my
mission & been much blessed in bringing souls into the
kingdom of God. And I do feel it a privilege to address
the Seventies at this time, Br Young asked me to speak in
the fore part of the evening but I desired to wait untill the
Presidency of Seventies had address them and I can now see
that it was wisdom for I should not have had the same
matter before me that I now have, I have a number of things
resting upon my mind which I wish to lay before you. Your
President Joseph Young has spoken to you in the spirit & power
of God to night has warned & exhorted you not to defile
your Priesthood & calling & not to have your minds all taken
up with fiddleing & dancing. I have taken up more real injoy-
ment this evening in hearing the teaching giving by your
Presidency than I would in hearing a million of dollars worth
of fiddle strings worn out, you must not think hard of
Br Joseph Young because he reproves, rebukes, & ehxhorts you
with all long sufferings & doctrin, for their is an almighty
responsibility resting upon his shoulders as the seenier President
of this August body of Sevenenties ordained unto the Apostle-
ship and the Lord will hold him responsible for the manner
that he watches over the Seventies and he is stired up from time
to time by the spirit of the God of Israel to reprove you and
the rebukes of a friend are far better than the kisses of an
enemy and you must not think hard of Br Young if he
does reprove you for he does it for your good. It is for better for
you to spend your time getting instruction & council than in
fiddleing & dancing for while the latter is of no profit to you the
former you will need when you are seperated far from your Brethren

Page 133

and abroad among the nations of the earth amid the
Judgments of God which are laying waste the people & while
you have to dodge between wind & water to save your head
in the midst of persecution a[f]ter persecution & mobs while
you are offering salvation to the people. I have meditated
much of late concerning the responsibility we are to God
under to God inasmuch as we bear the priesthood & are
numbered among the Lords Anointed as Angels are
watching us & bearing a report of us daily to God should
the Lord come down to see us to see for himself if the
reports of [us] was correct, what would the Lord think of
us & how would we like to hear the record read in the morning
of the resurrection containing an account of an assembly
of the Lords Anointed at Winter Quarters, upon whom
all heaven leaned & depended upon in carrying out the
purposes of the Lord in the Lord last dispensation & fulness
of times and fulfilling the expectations of Abraham, Isaac
& Jacob & all the Holy Prophets & Apostles since the world
began in gathering the Jews & rebuilding Jerrusalem gathering
the saints & rebuilding up Zion preparing the way for the
endowment of the ten tribes of Israel in the north country
& the covertion of the Lamanites in the west, & the
warning of all the gentile world that they may be left
without excuse when the Judgments of God cleanse the earth
from sin, wickedness, & pollution, and that our prayers
should ascend into the heavens for the Lord to avenge the
Blood of the Prophet Joseph & other saints who have been
martered & slain by gentile mobs in the last days, while
there is so much depending upon us & our prayers should
we be satisfyed with the record of this city of the Saints in the
eternal world kept by the Angels of Heaven If we should
hear read before an assembled world that the inhabitants
of Winter Quarters who were the Lords Anointed during
the winter of 1847 & 8 spent nine days of their time
in fiddleing & dancing whare they did one in prayer &
praise to almighty God, I say would we be satisfyed
with such record? No we would not, then let us turn from
such seenes of folly & spend more time in meetings
for preaching, exhortation, & prayer before the Lord
Br Joseph exhorted the Elders "not to defile their Priesthood."
I will here say If any man wants to feel the pangs of
Hell let him have the Priesthood & let him have
immortal glory, eternal life, Thrones power domin-
ions, exhaltations with all the blessings of Abraham,
Isaac & Jacob in view, then let him break the
law of God & defile his Priesthood and in a moment
he falls from his high esstate and all of his exhalted
hopes vanish in a moment & when his eyes are open
to see things as they are he sinks in darkness & wo
& the vary sight of the blessings which he has lost causes
a hotter Hell through his soul than fire and brimestone
many other remarks were made by the speaker after which
Br Cumings addressed the meetings & spoke of his mission to England
made some vary appropriate remarks after which the meeting closed

Page 134

~ Monday


14th I spent the day at home


~ Tuesday


15th I spent the day at home but had a good meeting at night


~ Wednesday


16th I spent this day at home reading


~ Thursday


17th I carried 9 bushels of wheat & 5 of buckwheat to the
water mill I spent the day untill 12 oclok at night with
Br Davis grinding in the mill Mrs Woodruff spent the
time with Sister Davis & we went home in the night


~ Friday


18th The soldiers have a meeting to day at the Log tabe-
rnacle
Br Young, Kimball, & O. Pratt was expected to be
there, O Pratt was there but the others were at Br
Hydes as he had just returned from the east.
we also recieved a large mail to day from various parts
of the earth several stars from Liverpool showing the
rapid progress ot our cause through England Scotland and
Wales and of the hard warfare of our worthy friend
Capt Dan Jones it seems as though nearly all Wales
was against him yet he is baptizing daily as he is travl-
ing through the nation we also got news of the Mexican
War
, American Congress, the loss of life on the lakes &
rivers &c


~ Saturday


19th I administered to Br Willard Richards early in the
morning who has been sick near two months I spent most
of the day in reading Br Johnathan containing the life
of Gen Z Taylor History of the Mexican War and plates of
the several Battles in Mexico &c


~ Sunday


20th Sunday I preached to the saints in our ward. In the evening
I went with Mrs Woodruff to Br P. Richards & herd two letters
read from his Sons in England which were interesting, we then
called upon Willard Richards who was sick soon President Young
came in sat a few moments and I went home with him &
spent an hour or two and read some late papers


~ Monday


21st I spent the day at home


~ Tuesday


22nd Br John Grierson came to the city to day the first time he has
been here for one year & a half I look him up & brought him home
with me he attended meeting with me in the evening and
spent the night with me. He took his cloths which Br Smoot left
with us for him


~ Wednesday


23rd [FIGURE] I called upon Br Richards in the morning soon Pres-
ident Young came in we went into the office & attended
to some Business. Br Brown came in & requested one of us
to go & preach the funeral sermon of his daughter who was
dead. Presidents Brigham & Joseph Young & myself went
to his house, we found not ownly his daughter dead
but a number sick in the house. The meeting opened by
singing & prayer by Joseph Young, after which President
B. Young arose addressed the meeting & said that he had a few rem-
arks to make & desired that he might have the Holy spirit while he
spoke. Said it was better to go [to] the House of mourning than to the House
of feasting for that was the end of the living & would force
upon our minds the truth of the desolution which we must all pass through

Page 135

we mourn for the loss of our friends when they die but if
they die in the Lord they are better off than the living for they
have gained one victory which the living have not they are
beyound the reach of pain, sorrow, wicked men, devils, and
devlish spirits which we are not, for we are daily in the
midst of all the suffering that mortal man is heir to &
when will this suffering end, when we die & not before,
unless we should live untill Satan is bound but all must
pass through death. Yet I would be glad to live to assist in
binding Satan as to the Saints we are being worn out
according to the workd of the Lord we have been driven &
persecuted in such a manner that there are but few constit-
utions among us except such as are broaken to peaces &
ready to fall into the grave & we are burying up the Saints
vary fast whareever we go over four hundred are laid
in the grave in this place & many in all places whare we
have stoped, but all of this pain, sorrow, death & affliction
will work to gether for the good of the Saints for these
things must needs be in order to work out the purposes of
the Almighty & give the Saints there exhaltation and Glory in
the Eternal World. the sectarian wourld with the knowledge
they have would if it was in their power sweep the fall
of man, death, pain, sorrow & afflictions with all their
attendant evils into oblivion & caused man to have lived
eternally as he was before the fall that he might never
have seen death, but such a course would in the end have
been the greatest curse that could have been heaped upon man
for by so doing it would entirely have frustrated the design
of the Almighty in the Creation of man & blocked up the way
for his exhaltation glory & greatness & the Lord understood
the subject so well before either the world or man was formed
that a Saviour was provided in the Lamb slain from before the
foundation of the world to redeem man from Eternal dead
so that by man paying the deabt of the fall by passing through
the temporal death, they recieve the power & glory of the
resurrection by Jesus Christ which gives them an Immortal
body which will recieve a far greater glory and power than
the mortal body ever could have obtained unto had it not
have been for the fall. And I suppose If I had power IWith
the limited Knowledge I have I should sweep from the midst
of this people sickness, pain, sorrow, poverty & persecution & mobings
I dont suppose I should ever have suffered this people to have
been driven at all by a mob but as the Lord knows so much
more than we do He has suffered it so to be & it is for a wise
purpose in God, it is for our good & will finally prove for
our exhaltation & glory in the eternal world, & gives us experi
ence in this life which we otherwise should not have had. "Adam
fell that men might be, men are that they may have Joy, but if
they knew no Joy they would have no sorrow, and if they did not
know misery they would not know happiness" [2 Nephi 2:23-25] for man must
experience one in order to comprehend & know the other Jesus
had to descend below all things in order to ascend above all things,
I am fully convinced that all our sorrows & troubles will work
out for us a far more exeeding & eternal wait of glory, hence we
ought nought to murmer or complain at our fate. It is true
we mourn at the loss of friends but not as those with out hope

Page 136

or blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from hence forth saith
the spirit for they rest from their labours (& if their friends are
faithful) their works will follow them, but what is the time of
our suffering in this life in comparison with Eternity After we have
spent millions of ages in Eternity & we look back upon our time here
& it will ownly look like the twinkling of an eye in comparison
and so it will be in the waiting for the resurrection of our bodies
it will be for a moment as it were before we shall stand in our
immortal bodies but no person can have power to raise the dead
except he holds the Keys of the Resurrection & no man can hold
the Keys of the resurrection or be ordained unto that power
untill he has died & been raised from the dead himself no
more than than a man has power to baptize a man legally
& lay hands upon him for the Holy Ghost & ordain him to the
office of an Elder who has not been baptized or ordained
himself. Michael the Ark Angel (Adam) holds the Keys of the
resurrection and after a man is raised from the dead has
an immortal body & recieves an ordination to hold the Keys of
the resurrection from under the Hands of Michael or those
having authority he then has power to raise the dead & not
before. Jesus was the first fruits of the Resurrection "He had
power to lay down his life & power to take it again," [John 10:18] when He
had lain in the grave three days an Angel, some person who
was appointed to this work appeared rolled back the stone & called
Jesus forth. We have power here through the Priesthood to lay
hands
upon the sick & they recover, to cast out devils open the eyes
of the blind & unstop the ears of the deef according to the faith of the chil-
dren of men. It is just as easy to raise the dead for one who is ordained
unto this power as it is for us to administer in the ordinances of the
House of the Lord here. Some times we lay hands upon the sick &
they are healed instantly other times with all the faith & medicine they
are a long time getting well, & others die. The spirit of devils who
are deprived of having tabernacles are constantly making war with
men who have tabernacles & they strive to take up their abode in
the tabernacles of men because they have none of their own, & where
they can get a chance they will many of them croud into one man
& try to reign there & some times they will kill the body & then
the spirit of the man & devils all have to leave it some times in
sickness & weakness the spirit of deavels get possession of the
body whare the spirit of man is pure & overcomes it but the
moment the spirit leaves the body it is beyound the power &
reach of the devils, some children are killed in this way for
the devil is making war with every thing that has a tabernacle
esspecially the Saints, & the devil rules a great deal in the hearts
of the children of men, and if he cannot go in any other way
he will go into a barrel of whiskey & run down their throats
and when the saints get into the valley away from the valley
gentiles the deavel will get into the Half mormons Hickery
mormons & will plead with them to get into them but when
we consider how little time we have to spend in this life in
comparison to Eternity we ou[gh]t not to consider it a hard matter
to be faithful to God & keep his commandments for when we
obtain Celestial glory we shall have to exclaim that it is through
the grace of God after all, for the glory far exceeds our sufferings
in this life.


Manny Many other remarks were made by
President Young and meeting was dismissed by W Woodruff

Page 137

~ Thursday


24th John Grierson left to day for Missouri I spent the day at
home writing I laid hands upon one that was sick


~ Friday


25th I spent the day at home choping


~ Saturday


26th I crossed the river carried G A Smith & family to Br
Eames I then rode to Br Robert Petty's & spent the night 30 m
I preached in the evening at the school house


~ Sunday


27th Sunday I preached in the School House & spent the night
with Br Petty


~ Monday


28 I rode in company with Br Petty to Mr Platts the Paunee
missionary teacher we spent the night with them 25 m


~ Tuesday


29th I rode with Br Petty to Fort Kearney was introduced
to the Quartermaster Van Fleet & other officers I dined with
Br Albert Petty who was doing their Blacksmithing
After spending several hours at the fort we crossed the
ferry & returned to Mr Platts & spent the night 20 m


~ Wednesday


March 1st 1848 This is my birth day and the first day
of Spring I am 41 years of age this day I rode with Br
Petty to his house and spent the night. It commenced
snowing in the evening we had a tedious stormy night 25 m


~ Thursday


2nd This is the most tedious stormy day we have had this
winter the air was filled with snow through the day
I spent the day reading the life of Benjamin Franklin


~ Friday


3rd It is still vary cold but I rode with Br Petty to Council
Point
& spent the night with Br James Alread 20 m


~ Saturday


4th It was a cold winday day we rode to the Ferry at
Winter Quarters the river was frozen over I had a severe
head ake I left my team on the east side of the river crosed
the river on foot I spent the night at home. This is Phebe
Amelia's
birth day she is 6th years old to day


~ Sunday


5th Sunday I got my team home Br Allexander and Br Petty
spent part of the day & night with me. I had one of the
most interesting dreams of my life during the night most of
it was taken from me when I awoke I flew through the air
from state to state & escaped from the hand of my enemies I
went to HEAVEN and saw the Saints in their employment I saw
Joseph & Hiram Smith & many others who had died of the Latter
Day Saints, the innumerable company of saints which I saw seemed
to be prepairing for some grand & important event which I
could not understand many were busily ingaged in making
crowns for the Saints one crown did not suit the artist so
they cut it into in the middle to make it over new the saints
were all dressed in white robes both male and female, my soul
was filled with Joy & glory while I gazed upon the scenery that
surrounded me but I awoke and behold it was a dream

Page 138

~ Monday


6th I sold Br R Allexander a waggon to day for $55. He paid
$45 which leaves $10 due I sent my horse & Mule with Br
Petty to sell at the fort we crossed the river with them
on the ice


~ Tuesday


7th Was a vary high wind in the afternoon I had a call from
Dr Cannon He wished me to call and see his son Marsena Cannon
75 Court Street Plumbes Dagaurious gallery Boston


~ Wednesday


8th I spent the day at home and in the evening I walked with
Br Young to Bishop Calkins and Br Fisher 72 years old was ma-
rried to Sister Calkins 73 years old we then walked to Br W
Richards
office & spent several hours with him.


~ Thursday


9th I walked with Brs Young & Kimball to three Stor◊es and
called upon sister Berry & family the Brethren gave them some
advise


~ Friday


10 Presidents Young, Kimball, and Woodruff with their Ladies
spent the afternoon at Capt Russells on a visit several remar-
ks were made by President Young concerning the Power of man
he said every man had power according to his faith and faithfulness
and good works that he had no power to give any man neith-
er could he take power from any man who was righteous for
he would have to go to work in unrighteousness to take away the
power of a righteous man and he could not be prospered in
it. He also spoke of rich men in this church & Kingdom being bro-
ught down poor He said men could ownly rise, assend, & be exhalted
according as they had decended below, been abased made poor &c
many other remarks were made. I spent the evening with
Mrs Woodruff at Sister Pratts whose husband has gone to the
Islands of the sea


~ Saturday


11th I spent the day at home


~ Sunday


12 Sunday I spent most of the day at home


~ Monday


13 Monday I spent the day at home and the evening At Br Blanchards
I went to Br W. Richards and lade hands upon his child I read the
December No of the Star giving an account of the progress of the
work throughout Europe also papers from the States concerning
the war & the politics of the nation


~ Tuesday


14th Spent the day at home


~ Wednesday


15th I went into the woods beyound the Punkaw camp with
Br Benbow & Charles Pulsipher & we choped down trees & loaded
6 waggons with fire wood & returned home distance of the
day. I was quite weary at night 8 mile


~ Thursday


16th I spent the day at home Brs Petty & Alread called upon me & spent
the night with me. I walked out in the evening with President
Young to Thomas Bullocks & Br Whitehead council was given to
them concerning emigration

Page 139

~ Friday


17th March 1848 I spent the day at home I attended a
Council of much importance in the evening. The Captain of
the Policee with two others who were members of the Seventies
were brought before the Presidency of the Seventies for assault
& batterry & swearing. There was present but three of the
Presidents of the Seventies, but the High Council was present also
President Young & W Woodruff it was agreed by the parties to try
the case before the High Council, which was filled up and the charges
read, the defendants did not exactly plead guilty so the testimony
was heard on both sides & it was proven there was a fight between
them & swearing. The Plaintiff opened the subject called witne-
sses who testifyed. The defendants spoke & bore their testimony the
Plaintiff then made his plea & also his councillor the defendants
then made their plea also their Councellor.


Then President
Young arose and addressed the council in an interesting manner
the following is an extract of the Clerks munites of the President
speech. If all parties are willing I will now make some remarks
there are a good many item pertaining to this case. 1st it was to be
brought before the President of the 70, but they did not pro
fess to have any Jurisdiction in the case ownly in the trial of
their membership but not as a peace officer. But the High
council can sit as a municipal court & try them for Church
fellowship and for a breach of duty as a Policee officer is it supp-
osed that a public officer cannot do worgong wrong I do not
think so & when they do wrong they should be reproved as
well as any other person, I shall speak my mind without
any regard to parties favor or affection this I always calculate
to do whether I gain friends or foes I have plenty of enemies
But I dont ask any favors of them I will not be turned for
a moment out of the course of right & justice if it cuts my
throat. I shall tell the truths some who have pled this cause dar[e]
not tell all the truth, if Mr Hill did tantilize the Policee they had
no business to fall upon him & beat him. I have known Br Hill
for fifteen years He is given to rough uncouth conversation
and tantalizing mens feelings, and he wont apostitize neither
Let me reason the case I am a teacher I often officiat in that
capacity. For instance Hosea Stout says that for 8 years he has
had a catalogue of names in his own mind of those who would
apostitize and as yet he had not been mistakened If a man under-
stands the things of God, he knows well that every Saint of
God ifs followed up through life by the powers of Hell, of the devil
of temptation, & of evry snare that can be invented on the earth
to make him apostitize, loose his glory & crown, this I understand
If I see a man doing wrong or is any way faltering If I take a course
to make him believe that he will fall does not that at once weaken
his faith & disarm him of power to stand? it does, dont I see things
as well as the Policee I do and if I saw a man that I knew
would fall I would not tell him so but would try to save him
as well as I could that when he did go my garments would be
clear before God & he could not rise in Judgment against me
I am here to save both Br Hosea & Hill but not to destroy them
we are here to the Policee as policee and to inquire into their
conduct as Elders. Has not Isaac Hill been afflicted and maimed
who sent Hosea Stout to take Isaac Hill as a Prisioner [prisoner] Nobody

Page 140

was there disorder. I will admit Isaac Hill was out of ordor
to go into a store in the mids of a contention & undertake to tantili-
ze a mans feelings while he was in anger under pretence of reproving
him for swearing A far better way would have been for him to have
waited untill he was calm & composed & took him one side & in a
friendly manner said Br Hosea I think your course in the store was
not calculated to dignify your office as Captain of the policee and as
a member of the Seventies he would then have recieved it vary
different from what he did. I know it is natural for Br Hill to tan-
talize, but that is no excuse for Br Hosea Stout to fight him, he should
have said I am a peace maker and magnifyed his office with dignity
& honor but instead of that he desended to the spirit of a tantilizer
& fell to fighting & swearing. Policeemen should be men of more noble
minds than to desend to such things, or suffer their spirits to mingle
with such low degrading things, Hosea Stout did desend to anger &
swearing which was disgraceful to a Policee man and men that
will practice such things are not fit for policeeman I know the
policeemen here are not Just right for they will get together for
hours together make fun, toll tales, drick whiskey & get drunk and
that is why they are so angry all the while, and they dont pray
when they come together if they did when they saw fighting &
contention they would do as John Lytle did when he parted Stout
& Hill says he (as he steped between them & shoved one one way & the
other the other way) get out of the way stop your fighting I am a peace
maker & wont have it. I never struck a man in my life though
I have parted many who were fighting I never saw the day but that
I thought to myself to good to strike a man. Now to the Policee I say
stop your baldadash pray with each other now if I have not told
the truth tell me of it. I mean to reprove the Policee if we dont
get better men in the valley I will vote against them, they have
confessed they are angry I want to see the Police officiate in their office
without getting angry if they do not they disgrace their office. I
know how Brother Hosea Stout feels concerning the spirits that murdered
the Prophets & still hang around us, but dont you know that devils
are going to the mountains as well as Saints, we have some of the mea-
nest spirits among us on earth the net has halled in good and bad
and I am watching them continually, and we have some of the
best men with us that swear that are guilty of crime yet they wou-
ld lay down their lives for us & for this cause, there are others who
will not gather with the Saints because they think the church is not pure
enough for them & they think themselves vary pure & will wait untill
the Saints get pure Holy & righteous & during all this time they will
live with the world in the midst of wickedness of every kind & think
it all well. We have good men & bad men among us, but if I see a bad
man or good man that needs reproof I will give it to him but will
I go into a store & strike a man? no would it make him any better? No
but we should be saviors benovelent & kind & imitate the example
of the Savior. men ignorantly fan the flame of mobocracy I have
feelings about it, and often say cut his infernal throat still I do not me-
an any such thing I am not good enough to do such a thing. The God of
Israel
was a God of war when Israel went over the read sea & the
enemies followed the Lord commanded the waters to overflow them
and it obeyed when I get good enough then I can fight to If I have
power to command the elements. Isaac Hill ought to have known better
than to have done as he did he is no more fit for a High Priest than
The policee are for their office, when they were by themselves he

Page 141

should have told him of it quietly is it not so Isaac (Isaac yes) I am
not going to decide the case that is for the High Council to do
Br Cutler arose made a speach & gave his decision. Both parties rec[ie]
ved their reproof made their confession which was excepeted President
Young said good would grow out of it council adjourned


~ Saturday


18th ^[FIGURE]^ Wilford Woodruff Jr's birth day. He is 8 years old this day
He wishing to be baptized In company with his mother & sisters &
Br John Benbow I went to the water & baptized him on our
return home we confirmed him. Brs Young Smith & others went
over to the Log Tabernacle to attend the council there


~ Sunday


19th Sunday we held a public meeting at the stand the meeting
was addressed by Br O Pratt upon the subjects of the Gods


~ Monday to ~ Tuesday


20th 21st I spent the time at home we had a rain storm during the time
[FIGURE] we recieved a large mail on the 21st of papers and letters


22nd [FIGURE] I recieved one letter from Br Spencer of Liverpool giving
an account of the progress of the work throughout Europe & of the distress
of nations such as wars, revolutions, famine, pestilence earthquakes &c
the same were confirmed by the papers Also the state of affairs in
the United States many members of Congress were dead among whom
was John Quincy Adams aged 81 years died in his seat in the house
of Congress His Father John Adams and Thomas Jefferson both
had been presidents of the United States & both died on the same
day on the 4th day of July in the fiftieth year of the Indipendoncs
of the United States. And John Q Adams died on Gen Washington
birth day.


Steam boat explosions, great floods, wars, fires
pestilence & politics seem to be convulsing the United States
I held a council this ev[ening]


~ Wednesday


22nd I rode to the Pigeon mills in Potawatame co Ia from there
I crossed Pigeon went through the best range of timber I have
seen in the Potawatame tract to Rollins settlement I preached
to the saints in that settlement and had a good time 15 m


~ Thursday


23rdI returned to Winter Quarters & found all well 15 m


~ Friday


24th I met in council this morning with the Presidency Sidney
Roberts
was present from Ioway City had some things to
lay before the Council which was attended to


~ Saturday


25th I spent a part of the day in council with ^the^ Presidency
& others upon the subject of the Paintings got up by Philo
Dibble
, the work was finally sanctioned by the Presidency
& Twelve who signed their names to it


~ Sunday


26th Sunday we had an interview to day with Capt
Vanvleet Dr Johnson and Mr Matlock the soux Indian Agent
we conversed upon a variety of subjects among others the trial
of Jack Reading. we then went to the stand where the Saints
metet tfor meeting or public worship we spent a little time &
returned home


~ Monday


27 [FIGURE] B Young, H. C. Kimball W. Woodruff Phineas Young &
others crossed the river & rode to the Log tabernacle whare we
met with O Hyde G. A. Smith with many others & went into

Page 142

Council concerning the organization of Potawatame County & herd
documents read from several members of Ioway City directed to the
inhabitants of that county concerning political & other matters there
were speaches made pro and con & finally answers were given
to the effect that we felt disposed to let politics take their own
course and find there own level we spent the night at Council
Point
H C. Kimball & myself lodged together distance 20 m


~ Tuesday


28th Met in council this morning we herd a letter read from
Oliver Cowdry expressing his feelings concerning some matters conn-
ected with the first calling of the Twelve. After conversing upon
a variety of subjects we returned home to Winter Quarters via Log tabern-
cle. On my return home I recieved a letter from Br & Sister Scammans
[FIGURE] saying all was well with them distance 20 m


~ Wednesday


29th About a dozen Pawnee Indians with an interpeter stoped in
this place to day had ^been^ to hold a council with the Omahas & Otoes about
going to war with the Sious for killing some of their numbers


~ Thursday


30th I spent the day at home and at the office and crossed the
River with R. Allexander I let him have 4 yoak of oxen & 4 Chains


~ Friday


31st I went over the river with Br Benbow to get some flour
I met in council with the Twelve in the evening


~ Saturday


April 1st I spent the day choreing


~ Sunday


2nd Sunday our city was visited through the day with a strong
gale of wind and sand which drove inside of all of our log
cabins & coverd evry thing with dust, we had a hay stack burn
down on the outskirt of the town situated in such a position
that nothing els could burn but had it been in any part of
town whare the wind could have blown the fire in any part
of the city it would soon been wraped in flames the whole
town has been in danger of being burnt up all winter, wind south


~ Monday


3rd A strong North wind to day I was In Council with several
Pawnee chiefs all the business they made known was they wanted
us to give them about 100 bushels of corn for their families who
was starving, theire is about 100 of the Paunees in tow we
we loaded there mules with corn & let them go home


~ Tuesday


4th [FIGURE] I went over the river and baptized Sister Peck for
the remission of sins and also for her daughter who was dead
I also baptized 8 others who had not before been baptized
one of which was Samuel H. Smiths ownly son & one was Peter
Balentine
an Insane man I confirmed 4 persons I saw
Br McKeinzia who had just returned from a mission from
the south. He informed me that Br A. Lyman was on
his way to this place. He stated there was a revolution in france
the french had driven their King Louis Phillipi from the throne
& kingdom and also his family and the nation was in a state of
revolution much blood had been shed


~ Wednesday


5th ^[FIGURE]^ I spent the day at home and was under much obligations to Br
John Benbow for performing a good act in afficiating in the capacity
of a peace maker and bestowing upon me some of the necessary
blessings of life

Page 143

~ Thursday


CONFERENCE
Of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints held at
the Log Tabernacle Potawatame County Ioway April 6th 1848
Conference organized at 11 oclok O Hyde appointed President
After the organization there was an intermission of one hour
conference then opened by singing and prayer by O Hyde who
also addressed the meeting & remarked that a first Presidency
had been appointed but wished it sustained by the Conference
O Hyde moved that Brigham Young be the President of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints it was carried unani-
mously. It was then moved and carried unanimously that Heber
C Kimball
be his first councellor. It was moved and carried
unanimously that Willard Richards be his second councellor
It was moved and carried unanimously that the Church
sustain and uphold Orson Hyde, Parley P. Pratt, Orson Pratt,
Wilford Woodruff, John Taylor George A Smith, Amasa Lyman
Lyman Wight Ezra T. Benson, in there office as members of
the quorum of the Twelve. Moved and carried unanimously
that we sustain Joseph Young, Levi Hancock, Henry Herriman
Zerah Pulsipher, A. P. Rockwood Benjamin Clapp, Jedadiah M. Grant
as Presidents of the Seventies. Resolved that we sustain Father
John Smith as the Partriarch over the whole Church. President Young
made some remarks concerning appointing the first Presidency. the
spirit of the Lord has been with us & we know what is right it
would have been our right to have appointed the Presidency, the
first conference we held after Joseph death but it was not wisdom
to do it we have now whiped all of our enemies with one hand
tied behind us & now it is time to organize the Church In speaking
upon principle said that an honest man would not be dishonest
neither would they follow such men as Rigdon & Strang, the
sheep would follow such as God sent even the Shepherds while
dishonest men would follow the wolves. The Lord will
rule in his Kingdom. I know how things have been & are and
will be. Some suppose that by appointing a presidency it is
robing some of the rising generation or taking away someones
rights but it is not so. Concerning persecution I will say
that the Lord will cause the wrath of man ^to^ praise him the rema-
inder will the Lord restrain. Resolved that we sustain Br
Wm Snow as President of the High Priest quorum and
Moses Clawson and Aaron Johnson as Councellors. Joseph S Clark
appointed as President of the Elders quorum Charles Hopkins and
Lewis Neley as councellors. Resolved that James Alread
be appointed & sustained as President of the High Council in
Potowatamee County and that Ira Overt, Aaaron Johnson
Wm Draper, Wm Snow, Even M Green, Lyman Stodard, Silas Richards
Henry W Miller, Noah S Bindley, Heman Hyde, composed the
High Council in Potawatame Co


G A Smith spoke
in favor of the Hcause of Br Yoakham. Elder Hyde made
some remarks concerning the subject of raising teams and
waggons for the Presidency. The Names of such were
taken as had teams to spare. Adjurned untill evening
Meeting was addressed by Brs Groves and Major & followed
by the President, who spoke much upon principle, the spirit
would guide into all truth then harken to council and all would
be right

Page 144

~ Friday


7th Met at 10 oclok meeting opened by prayer and singing.
O Hyde addressed the meeting from the 25 & 26 verses of the
[5] ch of math Agree with thine Adversary quickly while thou art in
the way with them &c [Matthew 5:25] The Adversary is some time called the devil
but it is not the case in this instance but while we are together
so many of us we should agree with our brother and settle all
difficulties with each other, while we have an opportunity lest
they will some day come into judgment and if we do wrong
and block up the way of the souls of men esspecially of the
Saints their blood will be required at our hands. And when
the Saints do wrong the devil will reproach the Almighty
for the conduct of his Saints. dont steal it is truly mean
wait untill God gives us the Earth. A little leaven leavens
the whole lump, lie a little, steal a little, swear a little and
man may think all is well. And these things may taste sweet
in the mouth but it will be bitter in the belly and will sting like an
adder I am opposed to any evil men that feel disposed to do evil will
always find an excuse for it but when a man is tempted to do wrong
let him enquire is there any harm in doing this is there any harm in
letting it alone then do right in all things then there will be no evil
to tell upon us many good remarks were made. He was then followed
By Phineas Young who spoke of his mission in the east his inter-
view with O Cowdry and his feelings concerning the Saints.
Joseph Young remarked that no man could go away from our meet-
ings & councils & say that he has not been warned against evil but
has true princ[ip]le taught him. O Hyde read several resolutions
against stealing After the second reading President Young
said that document would give the people the B. C. He said he
wanted to give a little council to O Hyde G. A. Smith & the High Council
and all people will you hear it then let your paper alone & keep pen
off from it and it will save you much trouble, the Innocent will
suffer by it send no man into Missouri for crime but to Ioway
as we are in that state. He expressed his feelings in plain terms
concerning being taken as prisioner [prisoner] at any time while he was
innocent many remarks were made. Adjourned one hour
meeting opened by prayer & singing & prayer. Teams were again
called for H C Kimball spoke upon the subject and brought up
the parable of the Potter [Jeremiah 18], names were taken for teams
remarks were made concerning the wives of the soldiers stoping
here or going on this season it was thought the soldiers would
have to come back for their bounty money and isf so would wish
to find their families here. President Young said he was under
the necessity & obligation to do all he could for them and
what he had was at their command and now what I want to know
is will the Church take this responsibility from off my sholdiers
and let me go free all said yes. A committee of 5 was
appointed to locate the poor, widows &c meeting dismissed.
Philo Dibble exhibited his paintings during the evening At the close of
the exhibition W. Woodruff addressed the assembly upon the subject
and said that his sermon was short his text was in two divisions
one on the right & the other on the left the right hand was a view of
the marterdom of Joseph and Hiram Smith in Carthage Jail and the
left hand was the canvass representing Joseph Smiths last address
to the Nauvoo legion. Before us is presented a synopsis or minuature or
commencement of one of the most interesting seeneries ever presen-
ted to man I have visited the national gallery in London which is considerd

Page 145

the best collections of paintings in Europe and there is nothing
in that gallery that will begin to compare with this work when
carried out and as brother Dibble has been moved upon to get
up these paintings I feel to bid him God Speed & if he will get up
the seeneries of this Church commencing at the Begining and go
through it untill now & onward and fit up a gallerry in Zion
It will be the continuation of the rise and Progress of the Church
& Kingdom of God in this last dispensation and will form one
of the most interesting sceneries that can be found in Zion it
is true we are passing through these scenes personally but our
children, future generations, & those who come to visit Zion
will feel deeply interested in this matter and would present to
the view at one glance all the scenes that this Church has passed
through O Pratt followed with few remarks also Joseph Young


~ Saturday


8th Saturday morning Robert Petty addressed the brethren who
were going with him as teamsters for the USA meeting opened by
singing and prayer. After which the meeting was addressed for
one hour and a half by W. Woodruff who spoke upon the duties of
the Saints exhorted them to faithfulness and spoke with the spirit
& power of God addressed the Brethren who were going as team-
sters, spoke of the judgments which awaited the world, & the
gifts & graces of the Church and a variety of subjects, was
followed by Father Morley who made good remarks upon educating
children he said he would not command his children to do any thing
if they would do it without &c Adjourned one hour
Meeting opened by singing & prayer. The meeting was then addressed
by O Pratt who spoke upon the trials of the Saints that these things
will work for our good that we had not been tried in prosperity
& hoped we should not be untill we were able to bear it he spoke
of the education of our children and many useful remarks
were made. Hail ye mighty men of Israel. Father Cutler addressed
the meeting and also spoke unto edifycation said it was the best
day he ever saw. Was followed by O Hyde. We had preaching
in the evening By Brs Campbell, Clapp, Hyde Young & others we
had a good meeting.


~ Sunday


9th Sunday Joseph Young spoke in the
morning to the 70th & ordained some, Br Kay sung Joseph
the Seer meeting was addressed by Emer Harris who spoke
well. He said he had the first Book of Mormon ever bound in
America. He spoke of charity said that when we gave to the
poor Children of God we gave to God & should recieve our rew
ard. He was followed by O Hyde on the dispute on claims
If a man will not do right if he will trespass upon the claims
of his Brother & will not submit to the decisions of the councils in
this thing then let the injured Brother leave his claim and let
the spirit of the Lord come away with him & let the transgressor
come down to poverty & yet come bending to his injured Brother for
bread and let this be recorded in the Church record and all the peop[le]
said Amen. G A Smith addressed the meeting & others, adjourned
one hour met according to adjournment & several speaches made then
the Conference adjourned sine die. I had an interesting conversa-
tion with Father Cutler concerning his mission. Joseph Herren
came to conference but stoped but a short time then went away
I returned to Winter Quarters during the evening the wind blew
hard we had a rough time crossing the ferry distance 15 m
I administered to 3 who were sick at Conference

Page 146

~ Monday


[1]0 I spent the day at home


~ Tuesday


[1]1th [FIGURE] During the day we were visited by three messengers direct
[FIGURE] from the City of the great salt lake they were from the
mormon Battallion had spent two months in the valley
Brought a large package of letter from the valley they left the last
of Jan. the most of the winter was in November & December the winter
broke the middle of Jan grass was 4 inch high horses mules & sheep
were fat and cattle had done well the Saints had put in 1500
acres of wheat & calculate to double the amount they have found
the best of lime & clay for evry kind of ware every thing seemed
prosperous there had been 10 deaths in all in the camp and many
births Father Woodruff had been quite sick but had got well again
I spent the evening with Br Richards reading letters


~ Wednesday


12th I spent the day at home writing Another drove of Pawnees
came into our town to be fed


~ Thursday


13th [FIGURE] G. A. Smith called upon me I spent a part of the day
with him at the office during the evening President Young
and Laday, G. A. Smith & John Benbow called to pay me a visit
After spending two or three hours together vary plesantly Mrs Wood-
ruff
requested a blessing at the hand of President Young so he with
G. A. Smith and myself laid hands upon her head & pronounced a
blessing upon her the following is a part of the blessing pronounced
upon her head By President Brigham Young.


Sister Phebe I lay my hands upon thy head to bless thee in the name
of the Lord. As thou art going forth with thy Husband into the vineyard
the blessing of the Lord will go with thee Thou shalt have power to&
wisdom to teach the truth to thy friends and thy sect thou shalt
not be at a loss for Ideas & words in thy teaching thou shalt do a
great work in connexion with thy Husband. Thou shalt save ^all^ thy
children to return to the church with thy husband who shall be prospered
in his mission. Thou shalt have power over all thy enemies & overcome all
thy besetments. Thou shalt be looked up to as a mother in Israel for
council and for Instruction


[four lines blank]

We also blessed Sister Edwards & Brother Benbow G. A. S was mou-
th in blessing Br Benbow


~ Friday


14th I met in council with the Presidency & Twelve, Hiram Bl◊◊l◊o◊rn
licens was taken from him for transgression


~ Saturday


15 [FIGURES] I rode over the river went to the Log tabernacle
with G A Smith on our way there we learned
that there was much excitement at the Point, the inhabitants
had laid off Council Point into a town or town lots one line fence
run through John Geens house and the people pulled down his fence
to move it He went to& put it up & took his rifle & swore he would
Kill the first man that crossed the line of his fence or offered to
touch it while the company stood looking at him Brother
[blank] Condit a shoemaker came out of his shop & walked up to
see what was going on & in doing so walked over the line &

Page 147

John Geen shot him through the heart and he fell dead
A Frenchman then struck Geen across the head with a club
and he fell as if he was dead but afterwards came to they buried
the dead man & took John Geen to Ioway City to be tried for
his crime.
I found the High Council in session when I arived at the Tabern[ac]
ole
I dined with Br Hyde found BSister Hyde sick. I rode in the
afternoon with Br Hendricks to Br Robert Petty's distance 30 m


~ Sunday


16th Sunday I spent the day at Br Robert Petty's


~ Monday


17th I rode to Winter Quinters through through the rain we
learned that a Steamer had arived at Fort Carney with Goverm
ent Stores & expected two Steamers in few days to Winter Quarters
the soldiers at the fort went on board the Steamer & smashed
the bar level to the floor broke all the decanters & glasses and
spilt all the liquor & there was not power & dicipline enough in
the Armey to take them into custody A romour came by the
boat that the Mexicans had risen in arms throughout Mexico
& retaken all new Mexico & the City of Mexico, & that the U.S.
Government had called for 50,000 men more to go to Mexico 30 m


~ Tuesday


18th I spent the day at home choreing


~ Wednesday to ~ Thursday


19, 20th Spent the time at home nothing of Interest transpired


~ Friday


21st Mrs Woodruff was vary unwell through the day & con
fined to her bead Elder Hyde came over the river He staited
that the river had overflowed the banks he rode his horse through
3 feet of water in the public road through the willows.
we spent a little time together in council as follows B Young,
W. Richards, O Hyde, G A. Smith and W Woodruff


~ Saturday


22nd I spent the day at home


22nd In company with Mrs Woodruff our children and Br Benbow
I rode with my carriage to the burying grounds I visited the graves
of two of my children I also rode down the bottom & visited
the old camp ground. Killed one prairie chicken & went home


~ Sunday


23rd Sunday A cold day President Young was sick. Spent
most of the day reading the account of the French revolu
tion
and the effect it had upon the nations of Europe


~ Monday


24th [FIGURE] I wrote a letter to Brother Orson Spencer &
one to Capt Dan Jones


~ Tuesday


25th I forwarded my letters to St Louis by Br McKinzie


~ Wednesday


26th A guard was called for to guard against the Omaha th[e]y
had again began to kill our cattle


~ Thursday


27th I went out in company with Br Benbow to herd cattle
we shot some ducks


~ Friday


28th I spent the day at home Br Benson arived in winter
Quarters
from his eastern mission at night

Page 148

~ Saturday


29th President Young made a feast & invited a few of his friends
inasmuch as we were about to seperate the company was
composed of the following persons B Young, H. C. Kimball, O Pratt, W
Woodruff, A. P. Rockwood Joseph Young, E. T. Benson Levi Richards
& their ladies we had a plesent time Br Benson gave sumthing
of an account of his begging mission in the east during the evening
two men came in from the Salt Lake City did not get much
news from them Br Snow arived also in the evening bringing the
papers & letters with him, the affairs of Europe seem to be in
a critical posture, reptures, revolutions risings of the people, the Thrones
of Europe are trembling from their foundations


~ Sunday


30th Sunday we met at the Stand Erastus Snow preached in
the fore part of the day and Br Benson in the afternoon after
which President Young called for a guard for day and night
150 persons names were taken meeting was dismissed


~ Monday


May 1st 1848 I spent the day at home


~ Tuesday


2nd [FIGURE] In company with O. Pratt G A Smith, W Porter & P W
Woodruff
I repaired to the burying ground with a load of stones
I went to the upper burying grounds & took up out our little boy
named Joseph & brought him to the burying ground near
Winter Quarters & put him into the grave with Ezra Woodruff
their bodies are in the grave No 34. I put a stone at the head of
their graves marked J. E. W. for Joseph & Ezra Woodruff I also
put a stone at the head of Sister Benbows grave with J. B. on
the head of his [her] grave. G. A. Smith Put stones ^at^ the head & foot
of all his relatives. And O Pratt done the same.


~ Wednesday


3rd We packed our trunks during the day and in the evening a
company of Soldiers arived from the valley & brought a mail from
the city of the great Salt Lake
[FIGURE] We got one letter from Sister Smoot and one directed to
Robert Petty, we got a letter from the High Council to the
Presidency here which was good we met & herd it read
It seems from the letters that they have sowed 800 acres
of wheat & inclosed 5000 acres of land under fence made of
poles


~ Thursday


4th I spent the day at home killed a calf


~ Friday


5th [FIGURES] I wrote 4 letters to the following persons A. O. Smoot
Aphek Woodruff, James Bevan, & James Fergeson.


~ Saturday


6th I spent the day at home packing up trunks goods &c [FIGURE]


~ Sunday


7th [FIGURE] Sunday I recieved a letter from Robert Petty. I crossed
the ferry in the morning in companiesy with Charles Pulsipher &
Lummorow I started to go to Br Petty's got to traiding point
met R Allexander and I returned to camp distance 36 miles


~ Monday


8th I packed up the following bread stuff for Father Woodruff
forwarded by Br Benbow Sister Edwards goes with it flour 150, C[orn] Meal 60,
Rye meal 32, Rusk 69, meal & shorts 22.

Page 149

The Otoe Chiefs with many of the tribe called at winter
Quarters
to pay a visit a fat Beef was sent tdown to them
they have behaved much more honorable toward us than the
Omahas have.


~ Tuesday


9th I spent the day at home the Steem boat Bandana arived
at our wharf at sun set & brought goods groceries flour passe
ngers &c Dr Scott gave me Br Felts address as follows Nathaniel
H Felt South third Street between spruice & stillman Almund stre[et]
No 93 St Louis


~ Wednesday


10th All is bustle through winter quarters the steemer
unloaded flour groceries, freight, baggage the waggons were
busy in spreading it through the town, several of the Saints
took their departure on board the boat. O Pratt took passage
with his family for England. Our youngest child Shuah was
taken quite sick at night


~ Thursday


11th All are busy preparing to go east or west I bought
groceries for Father Woodruff to day to the amount of $7.


~ Friday


12th Our child is dangerously sick today an alarm came into
town that the Omahas were driving off our cattle we rallied
about 50 horsman & gave chase we got all our cattle & found
it a fals alarm


~ Saturday


13th All are busy preparing to go either East or west I paid
Br W. B. Adams $12 on my eastern waggon and recieved
the following recept
Council Bluffs May 13 1848 This is to certify that Br Wilford
Woodruff has paid me the balance for my waggon and this is his
recept for in full of all demand W B Adams


~ Sunday


14th Sunday I met in council with the Twelve President
Young proposed that Brs Richards and A Lyman go and leave
part of their families untill another year if they could not
get along without.


We all attended meeting at the Stand
the congregation was addressed by W Woodruff & E. T. Benson
who exhorted the Saints to faithfulness & obediance & to
harken to council. President Young addressed the people
made many interesting remarks. He blessed the land of
Winter Quarters and prayed that no gentile city might
ever be permitted to settle on it. And he felt to curse some of
our enemies who was seaking our overthrow he felt to
bless the saints who go or stay he blessed the Potawatame
lands
He said we never should be driven from the Potaw
mountains except by insurrections among ourselves and he had
no fears of that.


~ Monday to ~ Tuesday


15th 16th spent the time mostly packing up


~ Wednesday


17th Our babe was taken with a relaps in the night & had a
severe time through the day to save her life Artimissa left this
morning with widow Foster for the camp at the horn

Page 150

~ Thursday


18th Our babe is some better to day I was unwell myself.


~ Friday


19 I was quite unwell to day, rumours have reached us that the
Indians had commenced slaughtering the inhabitants of
Oregon. Also that the Queen of England had abdicated her
throne & had shiped for Canida for Protection. our streets
are thronged with waggons on their way for the Horn
[FIGURE] I gave a power of Attorney to Z Pulsipher, John Benbow
and A. O. Smoot to transact business for me in the valley
I assisted John Benbow to pack his waggon he had a full load
^the above report concerning the Queen proved to be incorrect^


~ Saturday


20th I was near sick with cold on the lungs Br Benbow started
on his journey to day & went but little out out of town Br Z
Pulsipher
went with him & his company. A Steem boat came
in and brought about 150 passengers mostly Saints from England
among whom was Franklin & Samuel Richards. They also
brought the body of Elder Sarine he had been dead about
12 days


~ Sunday


21 Sunday Elder Sarine Funeral was attended to day & his
body buried, I rode 5 miles out to the camp with President
Young. there were about 300 waggons encamped I saw Br
Benbow & many friends


~ Monday


22nd It is a busy time throughout winter Quarters in preparing
to leave for the east & west


~ Tuesday


23rd A cold rainy day


~ Wednesday


24th President Young went out to the horn to organize the
camp. H.C. Kimball O Hyde G. A. Smith spent a little
time with me in the afternoon I crossed the river
and returned. One of the Brethren up the Pigion Creek
was robed in open day light, was gaged tied to a tree
& robed of his oxen waggon money clothing &c some of the
robers were taken [FIGURE] Judgment will overtake the wicked in
an hour they think not if they do not cease their wickedness


~ Thursday


25th I was busy in packing up to move I took the parting hand
with President Young I let him have twenty five dollars to help
him buy a yoke of cattle


~ Friday


26th I moved my family & effects over the river & stoped over the
river near the ferry


~ Saturday


267 I carryed my Big Boox Box & Br Stewart trunk & left it
with Br G. A. Smith I returned 24 mile
we had a rain during the night & wet us all in the night


~ Sunday


28th Sunday I spent the day at home


~ Monday


29th I rode out to day & shot a duck, a dove, & a large gobler
turkey


~ Tuesday


30th I spent most of the day about home


~ Wednesday


31st I shot 8 pigions

Page 151

~ Thursday


June 1st I spent the day at home


~ Friday


2nd In company with O. Hyde E. T. Benson H. Miller, Scofield
Daily, Hickman, & others I rode out to the Horn to see Presidents
Young Kimball & the Camp of Israel, we found all had crossed
the Horn Lorenzo Snow, & Zera Pulsipher captains of hundred had
gone on their Journey with a hundred each. we assertained their
were about 600 waggons in all crossed the horn they made a
splendid encampment & beautiful sight. their had been 4 burials at
the Horn 2 infants one aged woman & brother Neff had a son
named Charles 8 years of age drowned in the Horn which was
buried there. I spent a little time with President Young then
went through the camp & visited my acquaintance I wrote a
letter to Br John Benbow as he had gone on and I could not see
[FIGURE] him distance 30 mils


~ Saturday


3rd We took the parting hand to day with Presidents Young and
Kimball & many Saints crossed the horn & returned to Winter
Quarters
& on the way we were overtaken by one of the
most tremendioos storm of rain hail & wind we were
drenched with water from head to foot & returned cold &
chilly 30 mile


~ Sunday


4th Sunday Spent the day at home


~ Monday to ~ Thursday


5th 6, 7, 8 9th I spent the time mostly at home prepareing to leave


~ Friday


9th I crossed the river called upon President W Richards &
conversed upon the subject of his situation He was lying
sick & had been for many months Presidents Young & Kimball
with their companies had gone on, he was left behind & had not
means to go with I was waiting to see if I could assist him in
any way. I recrossed the river & took my famaily & moved
them into Carterville 2 miles from Kaneville into the house
of Br Dominicus Carter 12 m


~ Saturday


10th I spent the day at home


~ Sunday


11th Sunday I preached to the Saints in Carterville then rode
to G. A. Smith's spent a few hourse & returned home I admi
nistered to one sick 6 m


~ Monday


12 We went to G A. Smiths & brought him & family to our
house & carried him back again we had a good visit together


~ Tuesday


13 I spent the day at home


~ Wednesday


14th I rode to G A Smith's took him into my carriage then
rode to the ferry dined with Br Bensons at night crossed
the river, to see Br Richards. Just as we landed the blowing
of the Bugle & rush to men arms & report that Indians
were coming upon the people created quite an excitement
in the place about 80 men assembled together but were in a
poor state for an attack but no indians came they were
addressed by A Lyman G. A. Smith & W Woodruff
upon the necessity of being well armed & prepared for
Indians attacks while in an Indian Country the men

Page 152

were required to meet evry night at sun set for drilling. the
night previous to this the Omahas came upon some Pawnees
who were in the place & fired Arrows upon them they returned
the fire with powder & ball but none killed. we returned to Br
Richards & spent the night in his carriage during the day while
the Boat went up the river to cross over the river one of the
Boatman was knocked overboard & was drowning Capt Hewit jumped
overboard to save the man & thew would have both drowned
had not a Pawnee jumped into the river & saved them both 14 m


~ Thursday


15 I spent the day in winter Quarters we rode to the Cold Springs twice to the mill & other places with Br Richards
during the evening we crossed the river & returned home
by moon light 15 m


~ Friday


16 I spent the day at home


~ Saturday


17th I spent the day at home preparing my things & stowi-
[FIGURE] ng them away in Br Carters house I left with him
my large box containing my beding clothing &
a great variety of articles also a chest filled
with tent cloth bags, Iron, chains, & sundry articles
a pork barrel filled with pails Iron ware &c a buffa-
lo robe trunk tray &c one new horse harness &c. &c.


~ Sunday


18th Sunday I rode with my family to the Tabernacle
& met with W Richards O Hyde G A. Smith and a con-
gregation of Saints. W Richards addressed the meeting
& laid his situation & wants before them he wanted oxen
waggons & money to fit him out to go to the mountains
with his Brethren who had gone before him G A Smith
followed him & W. Woodruff & O Hyde upon the subjct
I dined with W Richards at Br Hydes A Committee
was appointed to go & obtain means for Br Richards
At the close of the meeting I took the parting hand with
many of the Saints among whom was W Richards
& O Hyde Br Richards blessetd [me] & said the spirit & pow-
er of God should rest upon me on this mission that
I should say in the end that it was one of the best missions
I ever took that no power should prevail against me
& many other blessings he pronounced upon my head
I then rode to Brother Carters, took Malinda Thomas into
my carriage (who had been labouring for us) & carried her
home on Pigeon creek 18 miles whole distance 25 m
I spent the night at Br Strattons


~ Monday


19th I returned to Br Carters 18 mile
I sold a waggon to Moses Martin for $25 in clothing


~ Tuesday


20th I spent part of the day at home walked to G. A. Smiths
bud did not see him 4 [miles]


~ Wednesday


21st We started on our journey this day rode 16 miles
[FIGURE] & stoped on Silver Creek & camped for the night

Page 153

~ Thursday


22nd We rose this morning & found my mules were gone we
hunted but could find no trace of them, we thought they
were stolen it soon commenced raining hard Br Carter
& myself took each of us a horse & rode in the cold rain
about 25 miles around the country but still could get
no trace of them but in the evening one of the Neighbors
found them about 6 miles down the creek (25) m


~ Friday


23rd We travled 29 miles & camped 5 miles west of
Indian town 29 [m]


~ Saturday


24th Travled 20 miles & camped on Sand Stone Spring
we found a plenty of stawburies on the rode & had a feast of
them at night 20 m


~ Sunday


25th Sunday. Our company consisted of myself & family &
Dominicas Carter with my carriage & Br Russel Homer
had a waggon & carried with him Libeas T. Coones,
John Mcmurry & David M. Gammit making eleven person of
us all. we arose this morning & found one of Br Homers horses
gone they mounted my mules & one horse & 3 men started
after him they followed him on the road east 3 miles on
his tral. we rode on to Evens Camp & spent the night 15
the Brethering Brethren spent the day hunting their horse
Br Coones shot a fine deer this morning which made us
a plenty of fresh meat


~ Monday


26 We started at 6 oclok drove 7 miles to the 20 mile prairie
entered that at 1/2 past 8. we found some bad slues & creeks
difficult to cross on the latter part of the Prairie we were
overtaken with a hard thunder storm and at the close of
it Elder O Hyde Br Johnson & others drove up drenched with
rain In a few moments another hard storm of wind & rain
came upon us & when that was closed we drove several miles
to Brother Roundys waggons on the open parie we stoped
& spent the night all drenched with rain 27 miles


~ Tuesday


27th We arose at day light & rode to Mount Pisgah 15 miles
Br Hyde went to Br Dailey, Br Carter & myself went to
Br Halls Mrs Woodruff was nearly sick we all met at
5 oclock the meeting was addressed by Br Hyde who was
constrained by the spirit of God to teach principle &
reprove iniquity W Woodruff followed him in the
same strain & was constrained by the spirit & power of
God to reprove iniquity & sin in great plainness & it done
good we appointed a meeting at 2 oclok next day


~ Wednesday


278 I had an interview in the morning with Br Aaron
York
who told me how all things were with him &
the Church as he knew we met at 2 oclok I addressed
the people upon principle & gave them Council Br York
followed & withdrew from the Presidency of that Branch
of the Church we then appointed by the voice of the
people Edwin Whiting for President & [blank] Whiting &
[blank] Demill for councellor all parties were satisfied

Page 154

~ Thursday


289th We parted with the Saints & left Mount Pisgah & rode to
Garding grove & spent the night with Elder Thomas Kington
We were truly glad to meet once more distance of the day 37 m
[FIGURE] I wrote a letter to Br Alpheus Cutler


~ Friday


29 30th We held a meeting with the Saints at Garden Grove
& found all things right we tought principle & had a good
time many spoke & a good spirit prevailed


~ Saturday


30 July 1st We again met with the Saints for a prayer meeting
& had a good time Br Dailly and Kingsley arived in the
evening to journey with us


~ Sunday


31st 2nd Sunday we left Garding Grove & drove to Sharaden
point and camped near Mr Townsend 40 m


~ Monday


3rd drove to Soap creek & camped for the night 40 m


~ Tuesday


July 4th We drove to Stringtown saw Br David Crocket
and camped by Br J Alreads 35 miles


~ Wednesday


5th [FIGURE] We drove 15 miles to Br James Williams
we spent the afternoon & night with Br
Williams and had an interview with Br Samuel Miller during
the evening a hard thunder storm was approaching us. my
Mules were tied to a large oak tree on the opposite side of the
street I felt impressed to move my Mules away to another place
I did so I also removed my Children out of the house Carriage
& made them a bed in the house I also moved my Carriage one
rod down to the house in which Mrs Woodruff myself & one
child slept, we had just retired to bed when the storm reached
us with great fury in a moment the large oak tree came thund-
ering to the ground with a mighty crash had I not have moved
my Mules it probably would have killed them had I not have
moved my Carriage it would have crushed it to atoms and killed
us dead for the body of the tree fell whare my Carriage stood
& just missed Br Kingleys waggon I considerd it an i[n]ter position
of Providence to save our lives 15


~ Thursday


6 We travled through Bonaparte & Farmington & camped
for the night 4 miles west of bonaparte & travled 20 miles


~ Friday


7th We drove to dBr Moett's & dined in sight of Nauvoo and
the Temple we had a view of it through our glasses. we
then drove to Keokuck & spent the night with Br Fisher 27 miles


~ Saturday


8th I spent the day in Keokuck visited several of the Brethr-
en also Ross B. Hughes


~ Sunday


9th Sunday in company with Brothers Dana & Kingsley I rode
[FIGURE] in my carrige to Montrose dined with Br Beebe we
then crossed the river on the steem ferry boat to
Nauvoo we called upon Almon Babbit. then in company
with John Snider I visited the Temple & went over it
from the bottom to the top whare I once more had a full view
of the once beautiful but now desolate city of Nauvoo the temple
was in a much better state of preservation than I expected to

Page 155

find it. The people in the City of Nauvoo were much excited
from a report that Elder Hyde would preach in the Temple
that day they had made many threats upon the subject & some
came in waggons from the country to hear & see but the
excitement was all among themselves for Elder Hyde had
given out no such appointment. I returned to A. Babits & found
a man who had come from Mishigan to enquire after the
gospel & to see the Saints I was introduced to him & told
his business. I preached the Gospel to him one hour He then
[went to the] river in Nauvoo and I baptized him and we returned
to Br John Sniders in the House that G. A. Smith built
we there confirmed him & I ordained him an Elder gave
him a license to preach the gospel & he went his way rejoicing
I spent the night with Br Snider


~ Monday


10th I called upon Elder Babbit & spent the morning I bought
the six volumns of the Times & seasons of Babbitt for $7
I then went down to Hiram Kimballs & dined with him
& visited his garding was the finest garding in the western
Country. I then called upon JohDaniel Luce keeping school in the
masonic Hall who seemed dejected I then crossed the river
to Montrose spent the night at Br Bowens


~ Tuesday


11th I sold my Mules Carriage & Harness to Samuel Beverly
for $160 & Buffalo Robe for $3.70 I then took passage for Keokuck
in the Hack, dined at Br Fishers & remained untill 8 oclok
then took passage on board the Lucy Bertram for St Luis
we went on deck but we did not sleep any at all for
it seemed as though the fleas bedbugs & musketoes would
have destroyed us they bit ourselves & children in a dredful
manner


~ Wednesday


12th We passed Quincy Alton & arived at St Louis at 11 oclok
at night. I spent the night fighting musketoes distance
from Keokuck to St Louis 26025 m


~ Thursday


13th I called upon Br Felt 93 South 3rd street He went
with us to 195 south 2nd street whare we took a room
to stop. the heat was so excessive through the day & no
circulation of air whare we were that it seemed as though
we should die I took a severe cold & head ake & was sick
through the night


~ Friday


14th I was quite sick through the day I walked out in
the evening with Mrs Woodruff & bought two set of
Musketoe bars


~ Saturday


15 Moved to Br Gaulters 104 Washington Avennue, corner
of 5th & Washington street we were glad to meet we
talked over old times spoke of John Benbow I was better to day
than yesterday


~ Sunday


16th Sunday met with the Saints. A large congregation
O Hyde addressed the Saints in the fore part of the day upon
the subject of the resurrection W. Woodruff addressed the
meeting in the afternoon I saw many people I was acquainted with

Page 156

~ Monday


17th I spent the day at St Louis but left in the evening on
board of the Herald at 5 oclok I took cabin passage with
my family


~ Tuesday


18 Early in the morning the Pilot in a fog run the boat
aground in a Pickerel swamp & it lay 12 hours before
it was got off we could not get any milk for our little
Shuah She was taken with bowel complant & was
vary sick


~ Wednesday


19th We past Peoria, Perue & arived at Lasell about
sunset. Shuah continued vary sick through the day and
night. distance from St Louis to Lasell 360 miles
fare for myself and family $11.


~ Thursday


20th I hiered a man to carry myself and family in a waggon
to Br Luther Scammans 2 1/2 miles north of lost grove
in Lamoile, Bureau Co Illinois we found him & Rhoda &
their family all well. Our child suffered much during this
days ride & was vary feeble when we arived & had a sick
night night 14


~ Friday


21st We spent the day taken care of Shuah who suffered
much through the day it appeared evident she would soon
be taken from us as she could not live long


~ Saturday


[FIGURE] Shuah C. Woodruff
Born Oct 28th 1847
Died July 22nd 6 oclok 1848
Aged 8 mont[h]s 25 Days
July 22nd 1848 Shuah Carter Woodruff
Died 18 minutes past 6 oclok this day.
Her sufferings are ended & she has gone to rest with
her Brother & Sister kindred spirits


~ Sunday


July Sunday 23rd We attended to the burial of our child, Shuah, she
was buried in the garden of Br Luther Scammons a few rods
South East of his dwelling. She was buried in a good black walnut
coffin set inside of an ash box. I put up a lime stone slab at
the grave with the following words well carve upon it which
I done with my own hand.
S. C. Woodruff
Died July 22nd 1848 Aged 9 Months


Sarah Emma Born July 14th 1838 Died July 17th 1840. Aged 2 years 3 days
Wilford Jr Born March 22nd 1840.
Phebe Amelia Born March 4th 1842
Susan Cornelia Born July 25th 1843
Joseph Born in Liverpool, Eng. July [blank] 1845 Died Nov 11th 1846 Aged 1 year 4 m
Ezra Carter Born Dec 9th 1846 died Dec 11th 1846 aged 2 days
Shuah Carter born Oct 28 1847 Died July 22nd 1848 aged 8 Mont[h]s & 25 days

Page 157

~ Monday


July 24th Mrs Woodruff feels quite unwell to day I spent the day at res[t]


~ Tuesday


25th Mrs Woodruff feels some better today in health she and her
Sister Rhoda laboured hard all day at the wash tubs. While Br Carter
& myself was busy in making the grave stone for our child


~ Wednesday


26th I went out in the morning with Mr Scammans gun & shot
4 times & Killed 5 prairie chickens we hoed potatoes in the
afternoon Mr[s] Woodruff expressed her feelings concerning the lo[ss]
of her children & refused to be comforted because of her children
which were taken away


~Thursday


27th I was unwell this morning spent the day quietly


~ Friday


28 [FIGURE] Luther Scammans had 18 acres of stout wheat in
the shock which he wanted to stack so he rigged two teams
and I took them into the field and during this day I
pitched onto waggons the wheat which grew on twelve
acres of ground & a young man loaded it for me, Brothers
Scammans & Carter put it into stacks as fast as we brought
it in. good judges of grain said it would yield 25 bushels to
the acre that being the case it would make 300 shock of
wheat that I pitched onto the waggons in one day making 3600
bundles, it was a vary hot day and I was not in good health
it was as much as a well man ought to have done in two days and
it was imprudent in me doing it as I had done no hard labour for
a length of time. At night I was sore from the crown of my
head to the souls of my feet I went to bed my nerves were so
unstrung I could not sleep at all


~ Saturday


29th I was sore with my labour yesterday yet I exercised some
Mr Scammans with two teams drew up the remaining 6 acres
of wheat to day & stacked it


~ Sunday


30 Sunday I spent the day at Mr Scammans


~ Monday


31st Left Mr Scammans house to continue our journey to Chicago
by land Mr Scammans carried us in his waggon we travled
28 miles & put up for the night


~ Tuesday


Aug 1st Travled 40 miles & put up for the night


~ Wednesday


2nd We rode 32 miles arived at Chicago at 2 oclock
distance from Lamoile to Chicago 100 miles
we went on Board of the Steemer Missouri St Louis
for Buffalo & spent the night expenses to Chicago $3.40
paid L Scammons for passage $5.50
$8.90


~ Thursday


3rd A hard storm of wind & rain through the night
we left Chicago at 3 oclok


~ Friday


4th we touched at Milwake & other places during the day at
night the wind arose & the Lake was vary rough the Captain
said it was the roughest time he ever saw in August
there seems to be some fatality attending my journeying

Page 158

on this Chain of Lake twice I have been wrecked on lake
Michigan
with my family & the boats nearly destroyed we
were in no particular danger last night ownly nearly all
on board were sick myself & family was quite sick


~ Saturday


5th We arived at Macannau at 5 oclok we bou[gh]t some trout
which we relished.


~ Sunday


^[6] Sunday^ we stoped at Detroit one hour many
passengers got on. Our Son Wilford was taken vary
sick in the night with a specis of the irricipilas he was
coverd with bloches from head to foot & in great pain
He recieved a blessing by prayer & laying on of hands


~ Monday


7th We stoped at Cleaveland at day light Wilford rested some
through the night but feels quite unwell this morning we
arived at Buffalo at 9 oclok we spent the night on board of
the boat distance from Chicago to Buffalo 1050 m


~ Tuesday to ~ Friday


8th We took Packet Boat on the canal for Schenectady & travled
through the 9th 10th & 11th Arved in Albany on the eve of the
11th distance from Buffalo to Albany on the canal 360 m


~ Saturday


12th We took the rail road for Boston were 11 hours on the
way distance 200 miles
we put up for the night at the Western Echange Hotel after
tea I took a walk over Cambridge bridge to Cambridge port
& found Br Alexander Badlam Manufacturer of Coach Piano Forte
and furniture copal Varnish corner of Washington & Maine
Street Cambridgeport I here found Elders Felt & Robins I was
truly glad to meet with them all, & to get to the end of my jour-
ney which had been a long & tedious one with my family of
2595 miles journey from Council Bluff to Boston by land
& waggons, rivers, lakes, canals rail roads &c &c wholes distance
2595 m


~ Sunday


13th Sunday I met with the Saints in Boston Lewis Robins spoke
in the fore part of the day I followed him. I dined with Br
Cannon
In the afternoon I addressed the meeting was clothed with
the spirit of God & was blest & edifyed as were the congrega-
tion I was followed by Br Nathaniel Henry Felt, Dominicus Carter
& [blank] Dudley asll spoke in the spirit of the Lord & was edifyed
I was introduced to Capt John ^Joseph^ Russel of Miramichi New
Brunswick He is the Presiding Elder of that Branch of
the church Miremichi N. Brunswick He went home with me &
took tea & spent the evening with me I had a happy time with
him I found him to be a good spirited man


August 14, 1848 ~ Monday


14th I spent the day at Br Badlums & met iat his house in the
evening with the Elders and had a good time we blessed Brother
Russel


~ Tuesday to ~ Thursday


15, 16, 17 was spent at Br Badlams. I wrote two letters one
[FIGURE] to Elder Appleby one to Elders Little & Hardy


~ Friday


18th Elder Rockwood called upon us this evening & spent the
night with us

Page 159

~ Saturday


19th I spent a part of the day with Br Rockwood in
the City of Boston Br Little spent the evening with m[e]


~ Sunday


20th Sunday I met with the Saints in Boston Br
Rockwood spoke in the morning Br Little followed
him we partook of the sacrament I addressed the
meeting a larger Number were in than had been
for a long time some apostates of the worst class
The powers of darkness tried to prevail for a little
time still I was blessed Br Little followed me,
we returned & spent the night at Br Badlams


~ Monday


21st I spent the day with Brs Little Rockwood Carter
Felt Robins & others. In the perusal of the publications
[FIGURE] of the day we discover calamity among the nations Thrones
are being cast down war & rumours of wars
fires & judgments on evry hand during the last
week one forth part of Albany is laid in ruins by fire
loss from 3 to 5 millions of dollars The great out break
in Ireland that was expected has closed without much sheding
of blood but it seems that nearly every part of Europe
is in war


~ Tuesday


22nd The Steemer Cambria has arived from Liverpool bringing
information that in the out break of Ireland Gen M Donald
was killed and 6000 troops and a prospect of the sheding of
much blood great excitement prevails


~ Wednesday


23rd [FIGURES] I wrote 4 letters to England one to O Spencer one
to Dan Jones one to John Enion, one to Joseph Hall. Brother Joseph
Russel
called upon me in the evening Capt Dudley was here in
the evening and manifested a singular spirit. Ilus Carter
called upon us in the afternoon


~ Thursday


24th I spent the day at home writing


~ Friday


25th I went into Boston with Brothers Robins & Badlam


~ Saturday


26th [FIGURE] I recieved the Daily Times this morning saying that
news had been recieved from the City of the Salt lake as late
as the first of May & that the Saints was in a distressed
condition for bread & that the crickets had eat up all
their wheet & barley &c how true it is we do not know
I recieved a visit from Elder Leonard Hardy He stoped with
27th me one hour we then took the rail road & went to Haverhill
took the express to Bradford & walked to Mr Burbanks
and spent the night distance from Boston 30 m


~ Sunday


27th Sunday we met with the Saints at Br Samuel B Hardy
East Bradford Br L Hardy addressed the meeting and I followed
him we truly had a good time we held another meeting
in the evening and was also blest with the spirit of the
Lord Milton Homes did not attend meeting but his wife
did, she is opposed to the work in spirit, we spent the
night with Br S. B. Hardy

Page 160

~ Monday


28th We spent the day visiting friends I spent two or three
hours with Milton Holmes He is quite glooomy feels unhappy
and hardly knows what course to take we were glad to meet


~ Tuesday


29th We rode to Lowell visited the Iron Founderies &c held
a meeting in the evening with a few of the Saints 25.


~ Wednesday


30th I parted with Br Hardy I rode to Boston he to Pterborough
I returned to my family & spent the night 25 m


~ Thursday


31st I went into Boston with Mrs Woodruff & done some
traiding to the amount of $23. I wrote a letter to Br
Ilus Carter


~ Friday


Sept 1st I wrote a letter to O Pratt & sent him L Wights
[FIGURE] & O Pratt Hyde pamphlets I wrote to O Hyde
[FIGURE] W. J. Appleby, Jacob Gipson N. H. Felt 5 letters in
all


~ Saturday


2nd I spent the day at Br Badlams


~ Sunday


3rd Sunday I met with the Saints in Boston there being
present Elders A Cordan, Lewis Robins & N. H. Felt. Elder
Cordon spoke in the fore part of the day much to our
edifycation. Among other remarks he said that the sudjets
were discussed in Heaven concerning us on earth & evry
subject wharein we were interest or were for our good
would rest with wait upon our minds &c I followed him
in the afternoon I addressed the meeting was followed
by Br Robins we had a good time. In the evening Br
Cordon spoke to a small number in Cambridgeport I followed
him had a good meeting


~ Monday


4th In company with my family I left Boston on the express
train of cars for Portland through some misunderstanding the
two trains waited for each other 3 or 4 hours so we did
not get into Portland untill 1 oclok at night we found Br
Ilus F Carter waiting for us he took us home we spent the night with him distance 100 m


~ Tuesday


5th I spent the day in Portland called upon Ezra Carter
& family we ascertained that Father Carter had been
in the day before to carry us out there but did not
find us & went home quite disappointed, therefore
Mrs Woodruff thought it best for her to go out to her
Fathers house to see her aged father once more so
she took Stage & went out & spent the night
with him He was quite out of health but got well
almost immediately as soon as he saw her, he was 76
years of age and a visit from his Daughter Phebe
was like one rose from the dead, we found all the
friends glad to see us


~ Wednesday


6th I left Portland with my children and rode out
to Scarborough to Father Carters and was glad to once
more see him & Sister Foss & their families I spent the
night at Father Carters 10 m

Page 161

~ Thursday


7th Father Carter walked with me to Sister Foss & we
spent the day


~ Friday


8th [FIGURE 1] I wrote A letter to Br Wm H Wilson at So St Georg
And spent the day at Sister Foss


~ Saturday


9 [FIGURE 10] [FIGURE 1] I recieved A Letters from J. Gibson And wrote
one to W. J. Appleby I spent the day to Father Carters
He retains hims memory & faculties of mind well he has
brought up one of the best families of sons & Daughters
that can be found in the state of Maine.


During the
day I read A work called the young mans guidge by Wm A
Alcott
seventeenth Edition which contains many excellent
morrals that are worthy of imitation & practice upon A great
variety of subjects it is A valuable work I have one error in
reading ie I read much more than I digest the Above work is
one of the best Gentile works I ever saw


~ Sunday


10th Sunday we recieved A visit from Ilus & Martha we
spent the day toat Sister Foss & had an agreeable time we
spent the night at Father Carters. Phebe Rhoda &
Olive Foss was At home. Sister Foss has brought up her
children well And they possess not ownly education but
true accomplishments


~ Monday


11th Father Carter Attended town Meeting I stayed at home
And read the Young Ladys Aid by Jason Whitman which
contained much good council


~ Tuesday


12th [FIGURE 10] I recieved two letters from W. J. Appleby &
J. Gibson I Ascertained that Br Appleby thwas
quite sick. In the Afternoon In company with
Father Carter, S B. Foss, Rhoda Foss, & Mrs Woodruff
I left Scarborough & rode to Gray left Rhode continue on
to Glocester & spent the night. A heavy frost at night 30 miles


~ Wednesday


13th A cool morning ground coverd with frost we
passed through Auburn, Turner Livermore Jay bridge
to Wilton, to Freedom Moulton whare swe spent the
night we came for the purpose of visiting them.
Here Sarah B. Foss Phebe W. Woodruff And Shuah C
Moulton
all own sisters had the prividlege of once
more meeting together it had been 8 years since they
had met before it was A happy meeting distance 45 n [miles]


~ Thursday


14th I went with A boy fishing I cought 21 trout & he
cought 7 it made us A good meal. we went over
Freedom Moultons Farm he has A good one of about
100 Acres. Mr Moulton has taught school 120 months
equal to 10 years. We had A rainy night


~ Friday


15th It rains hard And cold I spent the day reading


~ Saturday


16th I took A walk with Father, Moulton, Phebe & Sarah
to the top of Spruice Mountain We looked through
our glasses & had A good view of all the surrounding
country. we also rode [to] Wilton & back 6 n [miles]

Page 162

~ Sunday


17th Sunday we spent the day at Mr Moultons. I took
the following


~ Monday


18th It rained hard through the day we went to
Wilton & returned


~ Tuesday


19th We took the parting hand with Br & Sister Moulton
[FIGURE] who had treated us kindly And we rode to Gray
And spent the night 50 m[iles]


During the evening we accompanied Rhoda Foss
to A lecture deliverd at the Teachers Institute the
subject was the oxigen of the human system. He said it was
the oxigen that entered the system that sustained life that we
recieved so much into our bodies each day And that we discha
rged so much each day we flung of so much oxigen at each
resperation He said the oxigen would meet with the Hydragen
& carbon & create a heat or cholorie & this was the cause of
the heat in man the same as it was with a burning lamp
And if oxigen should scease to be created in man he would
scease to breath or live. He explained the difference in Quantity
of the oxigen created from vegitables or animal food that
animal food produced far more oxigin than vegitable, And
that the body discharged oxigen much faster in cold cou-
ntries than in hot, & in cold weather than in warm And
advised that people subsist more upon Animal food in cold
weather than in hot. He had tried it by going without Animal food
for years And became convinced that it was injurious to him He
inioyed [enjoyed] much better health since he made use of Animal food
in cold weather fat meat produces oxigen in far greater
quantities than lean And believes this is one reason of the prevelant
fevers in Hot countrys & seasons that oxigen is created so
much faster than it discharges that it breaks the law of nature
And the man has to suffer in consequence of it oxigen is olso reci-
eved & discharged through the pores of the skin And ahence their
was great propriety in keeping the body clean & washing often
He urged the necessity & importance of having all dwelling
Houses school & meeting houses & all sleeping rooms well
ventilated our sleeping ho rooms should be the largest rooms in
the house instead of small bedrooms & them closed without
any fresh Air. go into A crouded room that is not well
ventilated And the air you breath is poison to the Human
system. Mothers should be careful to se to their children
that they do not lyie with their heads coverd up that they
need not breath the air under cover. the faster A person
respires or any creature the oftener he discharges oxigen &
the oftener he needs food & the shorter would be his life
without it A bird can ownly live 3 days without food A man
9 or 12 A child not as long while some Anaimals or reptiles
will live three months without it A child needs food much
oftener than A man it respires oftener discharges oxigen ofte
ner which needs replenishing oftener if A person lives without
food the elements pray upon the body itself to creates oxigen
the flesh waste away & the persons dies. it is the fat of the
bear, the ground Hog, & all Animals that burrow ufp for months
without eating that feeds the oxigen & keeps life in the ani
mal yet when he comes out he is poor. He also recommended
that we put on warm clothing when we begin to feel the
chill of Autum & not wait untill we feel the blast of winter

Page 163

We should eat in the morning before we expose ourselves
to riding in the cold. And if we swished to save hay and
providnder give our cattle & stock warm stables in winte[r]
for it would take much more to sustain the system in
the open air He opposed the principle of Air tight stove
they were not healthy And many other remarks were
made by the speaker


I have discoverd in my travels of late in the eastern
states A great exhertion Among the people to improve thei[r]
system of education to make it interesting to the youth
& changing the mode of teaching the blackboard is int
roduced into the schools generally & it is found not
profitable to confine the scholar in one place not more
than an hour & are are giving attention to children of
weak lungs & stomach using gymnastics &c filling the
lungs with air & exploding it suddenly with sounds like
O, Bo, Ba &c loud to exercise the lungs making them stand
strait. I find many good things of this kind among
the people.


But when we look for the things
of the Kingdom of God it appears to me this nation
was never more barren than at the present time their
hearts seem to be bared up they are bound in bands
which are made strong & no man can loose them they
seem to be ripe for the judgments of God and well
they may be inasmuch as they have rejected the gospel
shed the blood of Prophets Apostles & Patriarchs & driven
the church & Kingdom of God into the wilderness and have
finally been cut off from the Church & kingdom of
God by a general vote & acclemation of the the Saints
of God with uplifted hands to heaven in the Temple of
the Lord at Nauvoo and who can expect to get access to
the hearts of this Nation now No one their condemnat
ion is made shure & their damnation slumbereth not


~ Wednesday


[FIGURE] 20th We rode to Scarborough carried Rhoda Foss with
[FIGURE] us, spent the night at Fathers Carters I recieved
three letters, from I. W. Appleby O. H. Dudley and James
H. Hannigan
. 25 m


~ Thursday


21st Spent a part of the day at Fathers & part at Sister
Fosses we had a family meeting in the evening Father
Carter was present also Joseph Fabyan we had a good
time I expressed my feelings in plaineness concerning my
course & the dealings of the Lord with me Phebe also spoke
in great planeness concerning her course and that her Pare
nts & friends would know in eternity why she had taken
the course she had in leaving her fathers house & following
the Saints the spirit of the Lord was with us Br Carter
spoke a few moments to edifycation Father Carters said
H was satisfyed with us and if their was a society of the
Saints whare he could spend the few remaining days with
them which he had to spend on earth he would be glad
to. It was an interesting time to us all


~ Friday


22 A hard rainy day I spent the time to Father Carters

Page 164

~ Saturday


23rd A rainy morning Mrs Woodruff & Mrs Foss carried me
in a waggon to Saco. I there left them & took cares [cars] with
Br D Carter & rode to Boston got a letter from Lucian
Bonaparte Richmond
, went to Cambridgeport & spent the
night at Br A. Badlams found Elder A P Rockwood there 100 m


~ Sunday


24th Sunday met with the Saints in Boston I addressed
them in the morning was followed by Br Carter the
meeting was addressed in the afternoon by Br Rockwood
who exhorted the Saints to carry out the principles of the
Epistles in emigating to the west did not speak but few
minutes in consequence of weak lungs I followed him
& had the spirit of God & was edifyed so were the people


~ Monday


^[FIGURE]^

25th [FIGURE] I wrote two letters one to Mrs Woodruff one
to Lucian B. Richmond Br Rockwood spent the day with
me & wrote to Br Joseph Young. In the evening we
laid hands upon the head of Br Allexander Badlom & blessed
him & ordained him to be one of the Presidents in the
sixts Quorum of the 7Seventies Br Rockwood was mouth


~ Tuesday


26th I left Boston in the evening & rode on the cars to worcester
[FIGURE] and stoped at Br Moores 33 Mechanics Street & spent
the night He kept borders & some of them had spirits
that was not good, that were vary far from mingling with
my spirit I wrote a letter to Br O. Pratt of Liverpool 48 m


~ Wednesday


27 [FIGURE] I spent most of the day in Worcester attending the
cattle show I saw some of the finest oxen I ever saw
in my life. I saw one large black ox that guirted 10 feet and
weighed alive 4,200, two Durham oxen which were two
of three twins calved at at time weight lbs 2200, each, a Manmouth
Durham Cow guirt 8 feet weight 2,500 lbs and 3 durham
twin calves looked well, the above was in a show. In
the pens I saw a black ^ox^ weight 2767 his mate read ox 2750
one yoke of read oxen the fattest I ever saw the yoke weighed
5110 lbs and one Durham Calf 7 months old weight 800 lbs
during the evening I rode on the cars to Northbridge
the cars were all loaded down in such a manner that
the cars were loaded & crouded almost to suffication
it was crouded out on the platform untill they were in
dangers of falling of, I called upon Br Wm sweat at
Joseph Aldridge and spent the night 15 m


~ Thursday


28th I found sister Aldridge a good woman also her
daughter they had recieved their endowments & were
true & faithful I met Br Sweat at Br Brown He had
been vary sick was on the mend we administered
to him and he was blessed. We met with the Saints
in the afternoon and had good times the spirit of
the Lord was with us & we had a good time
[FIGURE] I wrote a letter to Samuel Brannan of Calafornia ^and one letter to James Fergoson^


~ Friday


29th I parted with the Saints and rode to Worcester
& spent the day I visited the insane hospital which contained
about 500 occupants their appartments were neat clean & comfortable
Br Haven went through with me. I left Worcester in the evening

Page 165

on the cars rode to Connecticut took boat for New York


~ Saturday


30th We had rather of a rough night on the Sound we arived
in New York at 7 oclock I called at Mr Davids 160 spring street
The following are some of the addresses in New York
Mrs Fuller 204 Seventh Street east Number their being two of the No
Sister Sharugar 411 Hudson Street in the rear
Sisters Day & Hart 491 Greenwich in the basement.
Sister Michel 105 Nineteenth street between the 6 & 7 Avanue
Edward Cook (Clerk) & Sister Shelden 266 Mott street New York
Mr C. C. Watterhouse 84 Degraw St South Brooklin
David Malcolm 26 Columbia St South Brooklin.
Distance from Worcester to New York 200 m
I spent the day walking about the City I called upon Calvin
Foss
in the end of Pearl Street I called upon Mrs Sloan
I spent the night at Mr Davids 10 mile


~ Sunday


[FIGURE]
Oct 1st Sunday I met with the Saints in New York at the South
west cornor of Elizabeth & Grand Street over a porter shop I preach
to the People in the fore part of the day and was glad to met with the
Saints. In the afternoon I addressed them sumwhat lengthy spoke
of the Sacrament quoted the revelation saying that Jesus would
drink the wine anew with us on the earth with all the righteous from
Adam down to the last Saints exhorted the saints to be faithful
that we might be among the Number. their had got to bo [be]
so much done before Christ would come & when he did come
He would labour with all the Saints a thousand years through the
whole Millinnial in order to prepare the Kingdom of God on the earth
that it might be presented spotless, pure & finished to his Fathers
Throne, many other remarks were made after which the
Sacrament was administered and as the Presiding Elder
had left and they now had no presiding Elder it was Necessary to
appoint one I presented to them the necessity of being united in this
thing I recommended to them Br ^T^ Cartwright as a Presiding Elder
He was nominated seconded & carried unanimoosly for a pre
siding Elder over the New York Branch Brs Evans Ayers were
appointed his Councellars and Edward Cook Clerk I ordained
Br Thomas Cartwright to the office of Elder I blessed one child
After meeting I went to Br Cooks & took tea, after which
I had some talk with Mrs Cook I then returned to Mr Davids
and spent the night the Books presented 65 members of the
Saints in New York. It rained hard through the day & night


~ Monday


2nd It continues to rain hard, yet I travled through the day
in New York & Brooklin to visit the Saints I got wet took
cold had sore throat lungs filled up went to bed sick at night
it rained exeeding hard through the night 10 m


~ Tuesday


3rd I arose quite unwell this morning my lungs much filled
up it continues to poour down rain like a flood this is the third
day that it has rained hard day & night attended with high
winds which will probably prove vary disasterous to seaman
I was expecting to go to Philadelphia today but it storms so
hard and I am so unwell I will spend the day at at Mr Davids
while the rain is pouring down Br Kane came in & spent the
night with me I wrote a letter and Mailed to Mrs Woodruff
[FIGURES]

Page 166

~ Wednesday


4th I left New York took rail car arived at Philadelphia
in the evening called upon Elder Jacob Gibson 83 Dock st
street opposite the post office attended meeting with him
in the evening I addressed the Saints a few moments
returned home with Br Gibson & spent the night 120 m


~ Thursday


5th I called this Morning upon Sister McMinn in
Schoolkill 6th Street Between Market and Chesnut stret
I then called upon Col Kane Clerk of the United States
Court He had many men in his office yet as soon as
he saw me he laid aside all other business & came &
grasp my hand & seemed much delighted to see me
He talked with me about 15 minutes upon a variety
of subjects I then retired from his office & called
upon Br Gibson untill 2 oclok Sister McMinn then accom-
panied me to Br Sniders and Br Hammers Popler street
5 doors below 13th. We here saw Sister Poulter. Br Hammer
went with me to Br Johnsons, & to Br Gibsons distance 8 mi
[FIGURE] Their was quite a display in Philadelphia to day in depositing
the remains of Comodore James Biddle in the vault of the
Biddle family. His remains were deposited with milertary
honors of about twenty milertary Companies & three bands
of music, this was accompanied with display of flags
from public buildings chiming of bells, firing of minute
guns from the Navy yard &c. Comodore Biddle is the Eleventh
Comodore whose remains have been deposited in Philadelphia
and the eight or ninth who have died here. The ten prece-
ding Comodore Biddle who were buried in Philadelphia were
Comodores Decatur, Bainbridge, Barry, Truxton, Shaw, Hull,
Rodgers, Porter, Elliot and Dallast.


~ Friday


6th [FIGURES] I wrote two letters one to Elder Thomas
Andrews
Montreal one to A Badlam I visited a number
of Saints during the day


~ Saturday


7th I walked down to the office in the morning Elder W.
I Appleby
soon came in we went together to the Court House
& called upon Col Kane his office was full of men on business
yet when he saw me he came to us left his business & conversed
with us with deep interest upon our cause said he had fears
that there was trouble brewing against us in the west of Iowa
& wished me to give him the earliest information of any
thing against us


~ Sunday


8th Sunday I met the Saints of God with many strangers
in the old Mormon Hall or Marshall Hall on third above
willow street I addressed them in the morning from the
words of Jesus to his deciples "that as it were in the days
of Noah & Lot so shall it be in the coming of the Son
of Man, [Matthew 24:37] [Luke 17:26] &c I had the spirit & power of God resting upon
me & I spoke of the signs of the times and warned them
to keep the commandments of God that they might escape
the Judgments of God. I addressed the Saints in the afternoon
and had a good time we took tea with Br Adams on 5 st above
Brown a tobaconist Br Appleby preached in the evening from
Gal 1 ch 7, 8, 9 vers Though we or an Angel from Heaven &c

Page 167

He spoke well & much to our edifycation I followed him
bore testimony to the work addressed the Saints & dismissed
the meeting I had a good time all day and the best meeting
that I have had in the eastern country on this mission


~ Monday


9th I gave Br Appleby a recommend to preach & organi[ze]
the Churches in Pa. NJ & Delaware in my absence Brs
Carter & Kane came In the evening
[FIGURES] I wrote two letters & sent a bundle of
New York Herralds to W. Richards one letter was [to]
O Hyde, one to G. A. Smith I recommended the
recall of L O Littlefield. I spent the night at
Br Gibson on Wallace street near spring garding
with Br Appleby


~ Tuesday


10th I parted with the friends took cars & rode
to Newark & spent the night with Br Luke Provo[st]
No 4 Holsey's Court Newark N.J. 100 m


~ Wednesday


11th [FIGURE] I wrote two letters one to Phebe W Woodruff
& one to Jeremiah Brower Hempstead LI. I recieved
[FIGURE] a Prospectus for subscribers from Br Hyde & a line from him
I spent the day at Br Provost
I held a meeting at his house in the evening with a fiew of
the Saints and organized the Branch of the Church in that
place called Newark & Spring Garding branch I appointed
Br John Sanderson of Rowway the Presiding Elder ofver
that Branch of the Church I blessed two children


~ Thursday


12th I left the Saints at Newark took cars for New York called
upon Sisters Day & Hart at 491 Greenwich street, enquired
into their circumstances & an afair of L. O. Littlefield's
Then called upon Mr Davids and upon Mrs Sloans, Calvin
Foss
, and upon Br Cartwright 917 Christie Street New York 20 m


~ Friday


13th I called upon several of the Friends crossed to Brook-
lin
called upon Br Falcolm 26 Columbia st & C. C. Watterhouse
84 Degraw Street at 4 oclok took cars to Hempstead called
upon Br Jeremiah Brower & spent the night 35 m


~ Saturday


14th [FIGURE] I spent the day at Br Browers I wrote a letter
to Orson Hyde and gave an account of the cause
of L O Littlefield returning to New York & going back &c


~ Sunday


15th Sunday I held a meeting with the Saints & world
communed with the saints and left them in charge
of Jeremiah Brower. I spent the night with Brower


~ Monday


16th [FIGURE] I finished reading a work this morning entitled
A man of Sorrows or the Providence of God by
displayed by Wm Jackson S.B.C. Minister of the Gospel of
South Boston Church. It was truly an interesting work
Showing his sufferings from his childhood up & the dealings
of Providence with him his sufferings are vary great
I parted with the Saints this morning & took cars to South
Brooklin I called upon Mr Watter House who treated me
kindly. I met a number of the Saints at Br Cartwrights

Page 168

and had a good council they renderd me some assistance
[FIGURE] I wrote a letter to Orson Pratt and spoke of L. O. Littlefield
case and of others in England I walked out in the
evening with the Brethres & spent the night with Br Cart-
wright
. 35 m


~ Tuesday


17th I had an Interview with Br Hollister a few moments
in the morning made me a present to assist me in my
necessities, I took boat & went to Norwalk ct and called
upon Mr Valentine Merrill & spent the night distance 45 m


~ Wednesday


18th [FIGURES] I wrote three Letters one to Br David Bishop
one to Smith Tuttle and one to Phebe W. Woodruff I wrote
10 verses of Poetry in Mrs Woodruff letter 8 hours intervened
between writing the 5 and 6th verses during which time I went
ofut with Mr Merrill in an open row boat to get oysters we were caught
in a gale of wind & rain blown off from shore was picked up by
a four ton sloop & carried to land while going in we carried
away our gib twice came near runing onto the rocks but we got in
in safety with no other damage but being drenched with rain
the reward of which was a plenty of Oysters for supper After
getting through my Oyster supper I wrot the last 5 verses
and retired to rest for the night. The verses above alluded
to will be found on the following page. The following is all^so^ an
extract from my letter to my wife


I have been much blessed with the spirit of God since I saw you
I have felt more of the presence and Power of God with me than
I expected to have enjoyed on this eastern mission. I have felt
that some one has prayed much for me of late, I wonder if it
was Phebe I know you pray much for me I feel its power
and prize it much. I have never felt such a desire to prove
worthy of your Confidence and trust, shun evry appearance of
evil, keep out of the path of all temptation, and do right
in all things as I have of late. I have had much of the
spirit of Secret Prayer, have poured out my soul in suppli-
cation before God with tears of Joy, while the visions of my
mind have been open at times to see clearly my duty to my
God to my Wife and Children, to the Saints and world at large
I have also seen of late the awful certain judgments of
God which like a gathering storm are ready to burst upon the
whole gentile world esspecially this Nations, who have herd the
sound of the gospel, rejected it with all the testimony of the
servents of God, have stoned and killed the Prophets are
drunk with the blood of marters and Saints and at last have
driven the entire church & kingdom of God with the Priesthood
and Keys of eternal life & salvation out of their midst into the
wilderness & the mountains of Israel and by so doing have
turned the last key which seals their condemnation which
lingereth not and their damnation which slumbereth not
therefore they cannot escape. Not ownly the Holy Ghost but
that portion of the spirit of God that enlighteneth evry man
that cometh into the world, like a faithful embassador has finished
his work and is rapidly taking its flight from Gentile America
and wo, wo, wo is their DOOM

Page 169

The following verses I penned to my wife at Norwark Ct Oct 18th 1848


When shall I hear from my dear wife
From those poor suffering pilgraims too
Whose prayers shield me from that strife
Which daily flow from sin and wo


It learns me how to prize their worth
When I am from them far away
Earthly honors could not call me forth
Or make me leave them for so long a day


But O a message I am call to bear
For Him who gave and holds my life
In many a sacrafize I'm call to share
Often to leave my Sons, my Daughters, and my wife


O my Father shield them with thy power
Behold their earnest prayers which mount on high
Let Heavens watchers guard their silent bower
Answer their prayers and note their evry sigh


Their faith thou hast ever seen
Their sufferings Thou alone dost Know
None but Thee can tell what all their trials have been
Since they were wandering pilgraims here below


O my Father guard them through all time to come
Let their days and years be lengthend out
O call them not to leave my earthy home
But make a Heaven of my humble cot


May they fulfill all their visit here
As did their LORD then rise to reign
Inthroned in glory beyound the reach of fear
Or sickness sorrow death or pain


O! God forgive the past keep me from future Ill
Let light, wisdom, truth and virtue fill my heart
Prepare me for that glory which doth the Heavens fill
From the most holy anointed vows may I never part


O give me power to honor those noble treasures given
As the first pillars to build my Kingdom on
Help me to firmly stand with them in Heaven
That I may prove a true and faithful son


Then I will reign with my Dear wife and Children to
With Joseph and Hiram and all of Abrams seed
I'll shout Hosannah to God and the Lamb with all who go
From their graves with the redeemed of our DEAD

Page 170

~ Thursday


19th I spent the day at Mr Merrills writing, the storm of last night
continued untill to day noon when the sun came out. I had
a plesant time last night in a dream with Brs Brigham Young &
H. C. Kimball and the Saints in the salt lake valley we expressed
our feelings together concerning the signs of the times & the
Judgments of God which await this nation. I had a good meet
ing with the Saints at Mr Merrills I spoke to them one hour & read
20th the epistle of the Twelve to them &c


~ Friday


20th Elder David A Bishop of Stamford Ct called upon me early
in the morning I went home with him to Stamford convers
ed with him untill 2 oclok I then took stage & rode to
New Haven got in at 10 oclok at night I called upon Wm Hand
59 Green Street New Haven & spent the night distanc 50 m


~ Saturday


21st I called upon Sister Coffort Vining 31 Wm Street
and spent the fore part of the day she was a warthy woman
& strong in the faith also sister Hand I called at Mr Smith
Tuttles
found sister Tuttle sick was as yellow as saffern
I administered to her by the laying on of hands. I then
called [on] Mr Jesse Luddington water Street Sister Tuttle
recieved a blessing by the laying on of hands most of her
friends had expected she would die but she was healed by
the laying on of hands. A number of comforters like
Jobs had called upon her and reproached her because
she was ^sick^ inasmuch as she professed to believe in God,
and asked why [she] did not call upon her Elders to heal
her, this was done to reproach her. And she spoke out
and said O that the Lord would send Br Woodruff
here, it was but a few minutes before she recieve a
note from me stateing that I was coming and when
I laid hands upon her she was healed indeed and felt
to praise the Lord. I spent the night at Mr Luddingtons
on water street Fair haven


~ Sunday


22nd Sunday I met with the Saints at Father Jairus Sandford
and among others present was Mr Smith Tuttle and his
wife that was healed and soon after she left to come to
come meeting her daughter came to the house to take care
of her supposing her to be vary low but found she had gone
to meeting I preached in the morning to the Saints and had
a good time the spirit & power of God rested upon me I spent
the intermission at Br Sandford's I spoke again in the afterno
on to the Saints & broke bread with them and had a good time
I went to Mr Smith Tuttles and spent the night. I spent
about one hour with Mr Wm B. Goodyear whose address
will be Anapolis Maryland as he will sail for that place
He was Brother to Miles Goodyier of the Salt Lake valley
whom I saw in the mountains He made many enquiries
about him said he left New Haven while young


~ Monday


23rd ^[FIGURE]^ I spent the day visiting the Saints I conversed much with
Elder Jarius Sandford I felt strongly impressed by the
spirit of the Lord to ordain him to the office of high Priest
and Patriarch the spirit also manifested to me that he was
of the Loins of Joseph through the linage of Ephraim and
before I left him I ordained him to the office of

Page 171

High Priest and Patriarch on this twenty third day of
October AD 1848 he being 85 years 10 months & 2 days old
He has also done much good to the church he paid into the
hands of Elder Sarine $267 dollars for his tithing
and $163 for Sarine own use, and $17 dollars to
E. T. Benson has given $700 dollars in all to help the
Saints and for Tithing. He gave W Woodruff $3 to pay
his fare &c &c I left the old Patriarch rejoicing in
his God. I then called upon Smith Tuttle spent
the afternoon went to New Haven in the evening
Preached at Sister Vinings and baptized & confirmed
3 persons spent the night at Sister Vinings 8 mile


~ Tuesday


24th Rode to North Haven called upon Orrin Mansfield
at North Haven rode around with him to see the Saints & hel[d]
a meeting with them advised them to keep up their organi-
zations & hold meetings I had a good meeting with them I spent
the night at Br Mansfields I got 5 subscribers at
Fair Haven for the Frontier Guardian 15 m



25th [FIGURE] I took cars at North Haven & arived in Boston
at 12 oclok got onto an omnibus to go to
Cambridgeport but got blocked up by the great
procession marching through the City in celebra-
tion of the introduction of the water from the
long pond into the City of Boston the procession was two
hours and 30 minutes passing any given point it was considerd
the greatest display ever made on any occasion in an American
city and supposed to be more people in Boston than ever
known before the procession itself was supposed to be 7 miles
long Archways were formed across the streets decked with
ever greens & flowers and a Pyramid of evergreen & flowers
over top bearing a great variety of motions. The procession
started from the common 15 minutes past 12 N.


First came a powerful band of lancers, then followed thirty
military companies with full uniform & several other bands
of music, next the fire companies of the City with their
Engines ornamented with wreathes flowers &c next fire comp-
anies from the Neighbouring towns, next came the Cavalcade
of 500 gentleman & a few ladies a boys fire engine drawn
by two ponies was followed by two of the largest size
water pipes mounted on a platform drawn by 7 black
horses bearing the following mottoes. :1st First pipe laid
April 19th 1847. Water introduced into the city Oct 25th 1848
Next followed a Bricklayers platform with implements of ther
trade followed by a host of workman. Next followed the Bosto[n]
boat clubs with their Boats. Next came the Boston port society
with a ship fully rigged and manned under the command of
Father Tailor. The Salem East India Marine and the old
Marine societies followed bearing in their ranks the old palanqui[n]
which has not been seen in public for 40 years this was
borne borne by 6 stout Negroes. In a carriage drawn by
4 Horses was a large full rigged moddle of the famous and
fortunate privateer the Grand Turk. others carriages followed
containing specimins of American clocks, goods, carpeting &c

Page 172

next followed oak Hall expresses, Adams &c, Mrs Kidders, a printing office
pased on wheels with workman all at wok strewing papers cards &c
among the mass as they passed along, Next came Faneuil Hall
Market in miniature came next & the great display of Beef mutton
pork fowles fish vegitables &c. I presume was a temptation
to the hungry crouded lookers on. the market men followed
in great force with badges on their hats. A stuffed Elephant
passed mounted on a carriage with 3 persons riding on his
back, also an artificial flower manufactory drawn by 6
horses containing 12 young girls dressed in white all busy
making flowers. An apple tree filled with fruit passed by
with Adam & Eve picking fruit & the serpent on the tree
All the masonic and odd fellow companies of Boston was
in the possessin and hundreds of flags of costly aray
borne onward. The first Division of the procession was
under the direction of Hon John C Park & consisted of the
Mayor of Boston, commitee of Arangments, Watter committee
Water commissioners & Engineers Alderman President of
the Common Council members of the Common Council
High Sheriffs of the State, the Governor & suite &c &c
escorted by the Boston Cadets and flanked by the city Greys
following them was a long aray of civel & military function-
aries representatives of foreign nations, among whom was
borne the tri colored flag, the Clergy, medical faculty, Editors,
members of the bar, governments of the neighbouring Cities,
students of Harvard University, Mercantile Library Associa
tion in full aray, & scores of others companyies not named
All along the route public buildings, Hotels, and private
residences, wer crowded with Human beings. And the
common was almost littlerly coverd. At half past 4 oclok
the Government of the City headed by the Chief Marshall
reached the Common & took their seat on a de[c]orated
platform in the centre of the pond. After which lengthy
speaches were made by the Mayor and Mr Hale at
the close of the speaches the Mayor arose and said
Fellow Citizens it is proposed to admit the waters of
Lake Cochituate into the city. All those in favor will
say AYE. The response was in a voice of thunder.
The signal was then given and upwards gushed a pure
column of water 8 inches in diameter 80 feet into the
air & fell again into the pond, the cheering of the people
at this moment was overwhelming. The night was
passed with fire works & illuminations while beholding
these things going on the words of the Lord came with
wait upon my mind which says "Broad is the road that
leads to death & thousands flock together there while wisdom
shows a narrow path with here and there a traveller"
[FIGURE] I went to Brother A Badlams & spent the night I got 3
letters from Philo Dibble N. H. Felt &c and one Millennial Star
I found Br & Sister Wesley Siddle from Charlottetown N. B. 100 mils


~ Thursday


26th [FIGURES] I went to Boston and recieved 5 letters from
Phebe W Woodruff, Smith Tuttle, James Whiteheat, Edward
Cook
, and Lydia Hartford. After seeing the water spout in the
common, I took cars with Br Nathaniel Corey and rode to New
Bedford
spent the night with Gilbert Manchester 142 North second street
I wrote two letters to Phebe W Woodruff & James Whitehead 75 miles

Page 173

I spent the day writing I wrote one letter to Lydia Hartfor[d]
[FIGURE] I read an account of the Temple of Nauvoo being burnt
on the 9th Oct by our enemies. In reading the papers of
yesterday I learned that all Europe was filled with Blood
war disrress and calamities of almost evry kind Also
that the Cholery had made its appearance in London
Glasgow, Edinburgh, & others places in that Country
truly the wrath of God is resting upon the gentile worl[d]
$1000000 worth of fishing boats were destroyed on the
coasts of Scotland in one storm & 150 fishermen lost
there lives also $1000000 worth of American shipping lost
in one storm on our coast.


~ Friday


27th [FIGURE] I spent the day at New Bedford I wrote one letter
to Sister Hartford I preached in the evening to a few Saints


~ Saturday


28th I took cars with Br Gilbert Manchester & rode to fall
River
and spent the night with Elder John Duckworth 30 m
there was a Branch of the English Saints in this place
of 22 members. Elder Wm Low of Cherry Street
was the Presiding Elder many of them came in in
the evening to see me


~ Sunday


29th Sunday I met with the officers of the branch
in the morning at Br Lows, fellowship had been with-
drawn from Br John ^Henry^ Druce for unbelief and speaking
against the Authorities of the Church. He arose before
us and made his objections and wished them Cleared up
I answered them all to his entire satisfaction and he
wished to be restored to the Church.


We met in the
afternoon at Br Allens and administered the Sacrament
I addressed them and we had a good meeting I met
with them in the evening at Brother Duckworths and
I preached to them and had a good time. I parted
with the Saints walked home 2 miles in the mud and rain
with Br John ^Henry^ Druce & spent the night with him 6 m


~ Monday


30th I took cars, rode to Boston & spent the night at Br Badlam
[FIGURE] I recieved a letter from Smith Tuttle. 75 mils


~ Tuesday


[FIGURE]
31st Br Rockwood came in the morning I spent a few
moments with him He informed me that Br John Luce
informed him that Letters had been recieved from the
Salt Lake Valley as late as the 9th of July that there Harvest
of wheat came in full & heavy they had wheat enough alone
to last the Encampment two years also that they had large
crops of corn & was doing well that it was also healthy, this
was certainly Glorious news to us. Br Badlam went into
Boston with me I procured some things for my wife and
children then took cars and arived in Saco at 8 oclok
hired a waggon and rode to Sister Foss's I there found my
wife and children and I spent the night with them 105


~ Wednesday


Nov 1st I spent the day at sister Foss I recieved two letters
from W I Appleby and Wm H Wilson

Page 174

~ Thursday


2nd I spent the day writing. While at Br Henry Druce I
saw a wonder. His son 4 years old was sick his stomach
was enlarging they soon found he had worms they gave
him a bottle of Dr Jayner's tonic vermifuge. take 1 tea
spoonful, 4 of water, one of Shugar mix them together this
he took at once twice a day untill it brought away 40
worms 26 of which were preserved in a Bottle, 18 inch long
& half inch in diameter a number of them would measure
the child got well


~ Friday


3rd We had a dinner at sister Foss of a fine roast Turkey
Father Carter was with us. I spent the day there


~ Saturday


4th Calvin Foss arived home to day having been burned out
we went to Fathers in the evening & spent the night. A hard
storm arose in the night.


~ Sunday


5th Sunday we had a severe storm through the day & evening


~ Monday


6th [FIGURES] I wrote three letters one to O Hyde containing $10,
one to Smith Tuttle, one to Little & Hardy


~ Tuesday


7th [FIGURE] Election. This day decides who is elected President
of the United States for the next four years to come
I have not cast a vote for a President since this nation
Shed the Blood of the Prophets Joseph and Hiram Smith
Neither do I expect to I spent the day at home while
most men went to the Election.

The electric telegraph has become so perfect and universal
through the United States that citizens of New York recieved
the returns of many of the States of the Union before they
did the returns of the City itself and before the papers went
to press next morning after the election, returns had been recieved
enough to show that Gen Taylor was elected President of the
United States by an overwhelming majority


~ Wednesday


8th I left Scarborough with Father Carter & rode to Portland
with the intention of taking Steemer for Halafax but it had
stoped runing & I found no passage there from Portland I
spent the night with Ilus Carter 10 m


~ Thursday


9th I returned to Scarborough by rail road to the Station &
walked through a hard snow storm 4 miles to Father Carters 10 m


~ Friday


10th I spent the day at Father Carters and night at Sister Foss


~ Saturday


[FIGURE]
11th We Got the New York sun and Herald they contained the
News from Europe and the returns of the election up tto the date of
their publications the Herald of Nov 11th 1848 contained much infor-
mations, from Europe and America I recieved a letter from Dover


~ Sunday


12 Sunday I spent the day at Sister Foss I finished reading Gen
Greens account of the Texan wars and Battle of Mires [and] his imprisionment


~ Monday


13th I spent the day at sister Foss


~ Tuesday


14th I spent this day at Sister Foss and Father Carters

Page 175

~ Wednesday to ~ Thursday


15th Wednesday I spent this day also the 16th In preparing to
leave Scarburough.


~ Thursday


17th I parted with Father Carter and sister Foss and
their Families & with my family took cars and rode
to Boston then an omnibus and rode to Br A Badlams
No 1st Washington Street Cambridgeport distance 120 m
[FIGURES] On my return to Cambridgeport I recieved 5 letters fro[m]
the following persons 2 from Orson Pratt, 1 from John
Enions
, Joseph Hall, W. I. Appleby, and one from Wm
Maxfield
of Bedeque directed to Orson Spencer of Liverpo[ol]
and sent to me to answer I also recieved 5 No of the
Star all bearing good news of the progress of the work
of the Lord in that place,


~ Friday


18th I spent the day in Cambridgeport Boston and South
Boston looking for a house to rent


~ Sunday


19th Sunday I met with the Saints at Boydston Hall in
Boston I preached in the fore part of the day, and spoke in
the afternoon and was followed by several of the brethren
take it as a general whole we had a good meeting


~ Monday


20th We have had a tedious snow storm through the night
and fore part of this day Br Badlam and myself spent most
of the day in Boston geting furniture and sundry articles
to furnish a house I had taken for my family in Cambridge-
port
on the corner of Harvard and [blank]


~ Tuesday


21st We spent this day in getting home our furniture & sundry
articles to keep house with


~ Wednesday


22nd Nov 1848 I moved my family into the house which I
had rented of Mr [blank] McClure [blank] Corner of
Harverd and Davis Street Cambridgeport for $112
a year


~ Thursday


23rd [FIGURE] I recieved three [letters] to day from the following persons
one from James Furguson, San Francisco, 1 from Joseph &
Hannah Hall, 1 from Wm Low fall River containing $5.


~ Friday


24th Brs Badlam & Page were in my house this morning
talking over their business matters


~ Saturday


25th [FIGURES] I wrote 4 letter to O Pratt, Wm Maxfield
Little & Hardy and Wm Low and mailed them in Boston
I also sent Wm Maxfield one of the Epistles of the Twelve


~ Sunday


26th Sunday I preached to the Saints in Boston during
the day


~ Monday


27th I spent most of the day at home reading & writing


~ Tuesday


28th [FIGURES] I wrote 4 letters to the following persons
Ezra Carter sen Ilus F Carter Thomas Cartwright and
Wm H Wilson I also sent an epistle to Br Wilson

Page 176

~ Wednesday


29th I went to Boston with Mrs Woodruff & bought a
bed and some other things and mailed letters


~ Thursday


30th This is thanksgiving day in Mass. I dined upon a baked
goose and plum pudding with my family. Br & sister Page
took tea with me. Br & Sister Badlam Br & sister Bird &
sister Voce spent the evening with us I spoke upon the
things of the Kingdom of God, I recieved a letter from
[FIGURES] Little & Hardy & wrote one to Br Haven I was
at a large fire in Cambridgeport during the evening several buildings burned


~ Friday


Dec 1st 1848
Sister Ruth Sayers called upon me in the morning as
she was to leave this day for the west she asked a
blessings at my hands. I lade hands upon her in the name
of the Lord and blessed her


~ Saturday


2nd I rode in cars & stage to Peterboro & spent the night
with Br J. C. Little also saw Br & Sister Hardy 60 m


~ Sunday


3rd Sunday I preached to the Saints in Peterboro & had
a good time


~ Monday to ~ Friday


4th 5th 7th & 8th I spent the past 4 days with Brothers
Little & Hardy & the saints in Peterborough for it rained
& snowed so much I could not travel I wrote a letter
[FIGURE] to Mrs Woodruff


~ Saturday


9th I rode to Guilsom and spent the night withei with
Chilon Mack, Soloman Mack & their Father Capt Mack
came in & spent the night with me, Capt Mack and the
Widow Lucy Smith are brother & sister 30 m


~ Sunday


10th Sunday It rained hard all day I preached to the few
Saints that were in that place


~ Monday


11th I rode in company with Soloman Mack to Br Waldos
& spent the night He rehearsed to me the difficulties that
exhisted in the Walpole branch 11 mile


~ Tuesday


12th I rode to Br Gates in the walpole branch & preached
to about a dozen who come together in that place there
had been difficulties exhisting with the saints in that place
for several years and I did not find any unity of feeling
exhisting among them 6 m


~ Wednesday


13th Rode to Brother Wheelers and Newtons & preached in the
evening to a congregation of the world at Acworth 12.


~ Thursday


14th Rode to Peterborough and spent the night with Br Little
in company with Elder Haven 28 m


~ Friday


15th I spent the day in Peterborough I attended their auction
in the evening


~ Saturday


16th I rode to Lowell and spent the night with Br Pevy 50 m


~ Sunday


17th Sunday I preached to the Saints in Lowell

Page 177

~ Monday


18th I took cars rode to Boston to Cambridgeport and spent
the night with my family once more 50


~ Tuesday


19th [FIGURE] 6 I recieved 6 Letters from O Hyde, L. N. Scovil &
L Gaulter, Wm H Wilson, T Cartwright, W I Appleby &
Jesse Haven. I also recieved a Large amount of Papers
which Br Badlam had bou[gh]t for me to pick out files
to send to the valley. I went into Boston with Br Badlam


~ Wednesday


20th I spent the day at home reading & writing. And I find
[FIGURE] Gold from the publications of the day that the signs of
the times
are fulfilling many of the ancient as well as
modern Revelations and Prophesies. Thrones are cast
down, all governments of the Earth are tottering from their
foundations Anarchy & confuscion are begining to reign, Hatred
strife and war are begining to be poured out upon the children
of men. In the midst of this order of things, the Latter
Day Saints discover vast quantities of Gold at the base of
the mountains of Israel in the valley of the sacramento in
upper Calafornia. And not ownly the people of the United
States but of other nations ketch the sound of Gold Gold &
tens of thousands are rushing forward evry way in their
power to get to the gold country as a horse would rush to
battle, but the amount of Gold, silver, coper &c discoverd
in that Country indicates that the worldd of the Lord spok[e]
by Isaiah will be fulfilled, when He says that "for Brass He
will bring Gold, for Iron I will bring silver, for wood brass
for stones Iron["] [Isaiah 60:17], &c truly this is an age big with Events
Companies are forming in all most all parts of the United
States and ships in all our ports prepareing to take the
people to the Bay of San Francisco which is ownly 20 miles
from Capt Sutters Fort whare the Mormon gold digings commenced
and It seems as though all the world thought of at the present
time was to obtain gold. Though the Cholera has commen[ce]d
spreading in New York once more, yet the gold panic is
so much greater then the fear of the Cholery that it is
hardy noticed.


Among the letters which I obtained yesterday was one from
O Hyde who informed me that Olover Cowdery had come
back to the Church had made satisfaction and was voted to
come in by the door of Baptism. He was the first man baptized
into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in this last
dispensation
, under the hands of Joseph Smith the Prophet
but after being out of the Church eleven years he had now
returned again, and may the Lord bless him & Keep him
steadfast unto the end. The following is A Fac similee of
the Alphabet used in conveying intelligence by the magnetic telegraph
A - – B – - - - C - - - D – - - E - F - – - G – – - H - - - - I - - J – - – -
K – - – L — M – – N – - O - - P - - - - - Q - - – - R - - - S - - -
T – U - - – V - - - – W - – – X - – - - Y - - - - Z - - - - & - - -
1 - – – - 2 - - – - - 3 - - - – - 4 - - - - – 5 – – – 6 - - - - - - 7 – – - - 8 – - - - -
9 – - - – 0 ———
- – – - - — - – - - - - - - – - - - – – - - - - – - - - - - - - – - – -
[WILFORD WOODRUFF]
{Remember the [illegible shorthand]ion of [illegible shorthand]}

Page 178

~ Thursday


21st I spent the day at home writing


~ Friday


22nd [FIGURES] I went into Boston and done a little trealling
Brother Gates called upon me & gave me a letter from
Br Joseph Grover I wrote one to him in return Br Little
spent the night with me.


~ Saturday


23rd [FIGURE] I wrote 4 letter to Little & Hardy, to Orson Hyde
to Scovil & Gualter, & Thomas Cartwright


~ Sunday


24th Sunday Elder Little preached to us in the forenoon
I followed him I preached in the afternoon and sustained Br Badlam
in what he had done for the Church ie
Br Little spoke of my Calling and the duty of the Saints
to me I followed & treated upon principle I dined at
Mr Websters


~ Monday


25th I spent the day at home Christmas Day it rained some
[FIGURE] I wrote 3 letters to Wm H Wilson, W I. Appleby
and Charles Russell Linden V.T.


~ Tuesday


26th [FIGURE] I wrote and mailed two letters one O. Pratt one
Capt Joseph Russell. I also wrote one letter to (Luther) (Scammans)


~ Wednesday


27th [FIGURE] I recieved two letters one from sister Foss one
from Brother Gibson. I had a nice Turkey for supper
and had A. P. Rockwood A Badlam Wm Page & wife
and Br & sister Bird to help me eat my turkey


~ Thursday


28th I perused the New York Herald Weekly ending Dec 20 1848
and turne which way I will, the signs of the times are present-
ing scenes of Deep interest to the saint of God living at the
present time in the opening of this last Dispensation to prepare
the way for the coming of Christ to reign 1000 years on the Earth
with his Saints. All the Nations of the Earth at the present time
both Jew & Gentile Are presenting to the eye of men scenes that were
unlooked ^for^ by the ignorant or learned, the Philosopher, Asstronomer
Poet, Divine, Editor, Dr, Lawyier Statesman, President, Ruler King
Prince or Pope, which events are ownly understood by the man
of God inspired by the power of God & the gift of the Holy Ghost
such an one can perfectly understand the present signs of
the times. He can see the fulfillment of the words of the Lord
begining to present themselves according to the prediction of all
the Holy Prophets since the world began, such are the ownly
class who have faith in the litteral fulfillmen of all the Reve-
lations of Jesus Christ in the last days. They are the ownly
ones who understand their fulfillment as the events are passing
before them, or that have cause to rejoice therein, to all others
the Sequel of the present signs of the Times are hid behind the
veil of doubts Darkness and uncertainty


~ Friday to ~ Saturday


29th & 30th We had a heavy snow storm I spent the time reading &
writing I perused the New York Herald to Dec 30 which contained inte-
resting ite[m]s spoken of in following pages


~ Sunday


31s Sunday the last day of the year of AD 1848 A synopsis of my Journal
will be found on a following Page

Page 179

THUS ends the Year of eighteen hundred and forty eight
A Year big with events, a year in which the fig tree
hath rapidly put forth her leaves & blossomed for the summer
A year which has lade the foundation for the fulfillment of
more Prophesy & Revelation than has been fulfilled in whole
centuries in other ages. Thrones have been cast down, whole
Kingdoms have been overturned, the power of the Pope of Rom[e]
laid prostrate & he driven from his Kingdom. All the nations of
the Earth convulsed Revolutions, wars anarchy & confusion follo[w]
each other in rapid succession, Cholera, plagues, & famine follow
in the train. And last of all though not least in importance ◊
is the foundation laid for the disolution of the American
Government while these things are going on the Jews are gathe[r]-
ing home to rebuild Jerrusalem, some 7000 Latter Day Saint[s]
have gatherd into the valley of the mountains of Israel by the
Grate Salt Lake, and the Saints of the valley of the Sacramento
have discoverd vast quantites of Gold, silver, coper Iron & other
mettels the report of which has spread like electricity through
through the world which is causing tens of thousands of the
world to flock to that place these are some of the features
of the signs of 1848
The revolutions of Europe commenced with France. The people
rose in mass had 3 days fight, at the end of which they drove Louis
Philipi
King of the French out of France with all the Royal family
the People entered the Turrelles took the Throne upon their
shoulders carried it into the streets & dashed it to peaces upon the
ground. The people then undertook to esstablish a republican
government, it was said to be ownly 500 killed in the first 3 days
fight Afterwords a reaction took place with a fight & some
15000 killed, they have finally organized, and the world are now looking
Daily for the account of their electing a President and it is expected
by many that much blood will be shed on the occasion in consequence
of the many conflicting Parties. The Jerman States and Prusia next
follow in Revolution which is still unsetled. Next the People of
Austria arose and Drove the King from his Throne & Kingdom He
afterwards returned with Armies and bombarded Vienna 8 days
and regained his Kingdom but has been driven to the necessit[y] of
giving his people a milder form of government & more toleration
still his Throne is in danger. The Emperor of Rusia has had
much war and his Throne is in danger. The Irish have
made a Struggle to throw of[f] the Brittish yoak & they have failed
yet deep trouble is brewing for that nation. The inhabitants
of Rome have risen up in their strength and compelled the
pope to make change after change, and at last have dashed his
power to the Earth assassinated his Councellors and Driven him
from his Papal seat which has never before been shaken for
the last fourteen hundreds years and he has had to seek prot-
ection by fleeing to other Nations. While this is going on in for-
eign Countries let us turn our eyes for a moment to the Position
of Blood Stained America. A Nation though blessed above all
other Nations under Heaven yet she has of late been guilty of sheding
the Blood of Apostles Prophets Patriarchs and Saints she has suffered
mob rule to take the place of Constitution law & order and what
position is she in at the Close of this year, not ownly one of her
states Ohio has disgraced herself by having a legislaton sit for

Page 180

weeks & spend their time in fighting for the mastery instead of
organizing & doing the business of the people, but the leaders of the
whole Nation itself at Washington are engender[ing] the spirit of party
strife, hatred disunion & war meeting in seperate parties and
laying plans for the dissolving of the Union and the anhilation
of the American Government. And James Gordon Bennett of
the New York Herald & other Editors after Prophesying month after
month that their was no danger of disolving our union are with
all their prophesies recorded in their paper stareing them in the
face, under the necessity of recording the account of the parties
ways and means made use of to accomplis & bring to pass the vary
things they have been prophesying against. And while the Senators
& Statesman of the Slave states meet in convention and resolve that
if slavery in the Distrect of Columbia is abolished or prohibited
from New Mexico or Calafornia that they will immediately dissolve
the Union, lay taxes upon the shiping of the free States &c At the
same time Citizens and Statesmen of the free states meet in conven-
tion and Resolve if these things are not done they in like manner
will dissolve the Union. While these parties are growing more &
more determined, & further & wider apart. Still the public mind
seems to be blinded as to the result of these resolutions, and are
ignorant concerning the fruit which will be produced by the seed of
there own sowing yes they have "eyes but see not, ears but hear not &
hearts but do not understand" while the servent of God wfilled with
inspiration, can behold the scene in its true light and knows well
the result, with as much certainty as Noah, Lot, and Jesus,
did each in their day while gazing upon the conduct of the Anted-
eluvians, Sodom & Gomorrow, or the inhabitants of Jerrusalem and
as the words of the Lord were fulfilled in the former case in like
manner will they in the latter. [Matthew 13:15] During the past year the Asiactic
cholera one of the plagues of the last days has also again commenced
its march through the Earth slaying its tens of thousands. it has now
made its appearance in England & Scotland and has just arived
in the United States is in New York New Orleans Mobeal Memphis
and Cincinnati the last report states about 100 daily in New Orleans
the signs of the gathering of the Jews has been vary prominant during
the past [year], the governments of the world have in some measure been
exherted to favor that people. And while I turn my eye towards Zion
I can see the Lord is favoring her. The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints has been organized with a first Presidency
of three viz Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, and Willard Richards,
who have gatherd to the mountains of Israel in the valley of the
Great Salt Lake
took with them about 3000 souls & some 8000
head of cattle of all kinds which now makes a population of about
7000 saints in the City of the Great Salt Lake Great Bason North
America. The Saints who were located near the Bay of San
Francisco
have found a vast amount of welth in mines, such
as Dimonds, Gold, Silver, quick silver, platina, copper, lead, tin, zink
Iron &c, these things have been found to such an extent that it is
creating great excitement throughout the world esspecially in
the United States and tens of thousands are flocking to that land.
Crime of Evry kinsd has apparently increased 100 per ct throughout the
United States and the cup of their iniquity is full and the hour of
their Judgment is come Calamity sorrow & Death has recieved its comm-
ission to visit this land. And the spirit whispers to me that eighteen
hundred & forty nine will lay waste many thousands of the inhabitants
of the Earth esspecilly of this land by Cholera fire plage and Judgments

Page 181

I Travelled 4850 Miles
I Attended with the Twelve 12 concils
I Held public meetings 44 Meetings
I Baptized 14 persons
I Confirmed 14 Persons
I Ordained Jarias Sandford 85 1 Patriarch
President of the seventies 1 seventy
Administered to sick persons 20 sick persons
I Blessed 10 children
I wrote 60 Letters
I Recieved 39 Letters

Page 182

[FIGURE] WILFORD WOODRUFFS
JOURNAL
FOR
1849

Page 183

~ Monday


JAN 1st 1849 Monday this is the first day of 1849 we have
traversed in our minds and recorded some things
which has transpired during the past year what the present year
will bring to pass time must determin. But I have no boubt [doubt] but the
peresent year will chronicle events of equal importance with the past
As the crices has commenced with the past it will progress with the
future untill all nations will be constrained to acknowledg their is A
God in Heaven whose hand is stretched out to perform A great and
marvellous work in the Earth in the last days


The News this morning is in the Boston Daily times is that the steam[er]
Europa had arived Bringing News that Prince Louis Napoleon was elect[ed]
President of France. The Emperor of Austria had Abdicated his
Throne in favor of his young Nephew. Dredful starvation in Ireland
Raging of the cholera in Europe and esspecially in the south of
America, it is raging at New Orleans in such a manner that the inh-
abitants are fleeing out all that can get out. All business is stoping
captains Mates &clerks & Hands Are dying of the steam boats so that
they have to stop running. I shall watch the movements of the
signs of the times & record them daily


[FIGURE] I recieved a letter from Br Josiah G Hardy brought by the Hand
of Wm Goodridge [who] wished me to visit A sister who was possesed with
an evil spirit so I Accompanied Him to West Newbury, to see her
I spent the night with them I found her in a low state she was con
troled by An Evil spirit Altogether I Administered to her by the laying
on of hands
she was better for a time but she afterwards gave
way to the same spirit Again 40 m


~ Tuesday


2nd I spent the day at Mr Courier. It was A severe winters day
the air was filled with snow


~ Wednesday


3rd It is still vary severe wether A large body of snow on the ground
the air filled with snow Mr Courier carried me in A sleigh 6 m
to Br Samuel Hardy I covered myself up in a Buffalo And I came
nigh friezeing. Mr Courier froze his face badly I spent the night
with Br Hardy 6m


~ Thursday


34th It is still vary cold I spent the day at Mansel Hardy And night
at Samuel Hardy we had A meeting I preached to the people
I had A dream At night was with the Twelve L Wight present W Richards spoke of me


~ Friday


45th I went to Elder Josiah Hardy spent the day and night I Blessed
his youngest child it is still vary cold


~ Saturday


6th I went to Mr BurBanks And spent the day And night


~ Sunday


7th Sunday I met with the saints At Brother Hardy And preached
to them Administered unto 2 that were sick. Mrs Milton Holmes Atte-
nded meeting in the Evening Milton Holmes came to see me and
spent several Hours with me he walked to Mr Burbanks with me
He is quite unhappy at the present time He is now out of the church
and has not taken any active part in the work since his Father
And Mother was cut off. I spent the night at Mr Burbanks


~ Monday


8th I rode to Haverhill in a sleigh called upon Abram Boyington
took cars rode to Boston And spent the night once more at
home with My family. ^40 m^ I visited widow Hardy. she has 5 sons &
7 Daughter 12 in all, they were All seated in A row in her room All at work
closing shoes they have 4 c[en]ts per pair & close 70 pair daily, the 12 children
were born in 14 years All living

Page 184

~ Tuesday


9th [FIGURE] I recieved 3 Letters from O. Spencer Dan Jones & W. I.
Appleby
And one from Robert Windley All contained good news
capt Dan Jones expresses his feelings in warm terms concerning my
letters to him And says he feels incouraged to go ahead in the name
of the Lord says he has raised up a Branch at Myrtha the Mother
Branch of Britain, over 800 members. And the sum total He
had raised up in that country was represented at the general
conference of Manchester England Aug 14th 1848 amounting to
2747 member. The whole representation at this general confer
ence of England Scotland & Wales was 17902 members 350
branches, 929 Elders 1185 Priest, 608 Teachers 341 Deacons Added
since May 31, 1846, 8467. Elder Orson Pratt is now President
of the Churches in the British Isles and herd the Above reppesenta
tion. Elder Jones Adds I have published in the welch language
48 different kinds And size of pamphlets comprising more
original matter than the Book of Mormon Doctrins & Covenants
& voice of warning, And have circulated one million eight
hundred thousand of Pages all of which preach night And
Day to rich & poor the eternal truths of Mormonism And
cheer the Honest Harted, many learned And some very noted
men have Embraced the work. I have been Enabled to subdue my
foes many of the gifts of the spirit are manifest. one young
man who had been Deef & Dumb 8 years was healed when
coming up out of the waters of Baptism so he both herd
And spake was ordained to the Priesthood And is now pre-
aching the gospel with success. Capt Jones is Adding 150 per month
Elder Spencer writes many good things his is much better says
the work is rolling forth in much Power I have been of late
stiring up the saints to pay their tithing I have visited many
of the conferences for this purpose I feel incouraged to Believe
I shall gather a good sum for the Temple. their Are 4 persons
Expecting to come in possession of large sums of money before I
go to America from them I expect to get several thousand pounds
As tithing to gladden the hearts of the saints in the valley. the Addition
to the Churches continue to be great the Emigration falls much short
of the increase. their may be 1500 saints Emigrate this season but
what is that among so many. O. Pratt thinks it would take 300
ships to carry the British saints at the present time, the hopes
of the wicked Are perishing while looking for better times And ind-
ividuals And Nations both feel like grasping all they can get hold
of Either by fair or foul means. The Papel Crown has At length
fallen. It looks As though the Beastly power of Mobocracy spoken
of in Revelations was likely to destroy the dominion of the Mother
of Abominations spedily [Revelation 17:5]. The Emperor of Austria has Adbdicated
and the King of Prussia has called A constitutional government
but the Saints wax vary bold And utter their testimony with
As much assurance in the Holy Ghost. it is truly delightful to
see them pushing sectarian churches And Demolishing human
creeds as so much hay & stubble, the weak are becoming strong
and the Gentiles marvel. You would be asstonished to see the
issue of Books Stars And tracts from the Star office. evry fortne
ight the issue of Stars has doubled since I took charge in
47. And all other works in Equal ratio. The tide of truth
rolls irrisitably through the land. there will soon be some
vary Efficient Preachers in the French Nation from those parts
we Also have A HINDU in this country that speaks more than

Page 185

a dozen different languages Arabic &c &c who is preparing to go
to Asia to Preach the gospel soon. Elder Levi Richards & wife
arived in England safe. I feel thankful to my heavenly Father
I recieve in the foregoing letters and for his blessings to his saints
and his wonderful works among the children of men


I also recieved Ny York Weekly Herald, which contained a
copy of the Calafornia land Bill also the following before the House
of Congress A Government for the Mormons


Mr Rockwell from Massachusetts from the committee on Territories
to whom had been refered a resolution instructing them to inq-
uire into the expediency of reporting a Bill to Esstablishing a Territorial
Government for the Mormons residing at the Salt Lake in California
were on motion discharged from the further consideration of the
subject.


Other papers gave an account of the spread of the cholera in
the South


~ Wednesday


10th [FIGURES] I recieved 3 letters one from Sister Enion, Elias W.
Williams
and Joseph Grover. I spent the Afternoon At Br A. Badlam
A. P. Rockwood spent the evening with us I wrote 3 letter to
Mrs Foss, Jacob Gibson, & Robert Windley


~ Thursday


11th The Boston Times to day says the cholera is raging at wheeling
Cincinnati, Louisville, Memphis and Vicksburg


A Letter from the camp of Israel 400 miles from Winter Quarters
July 10th 1848 published in the Star of Oct 15 1848 says that President
Brigham Young & Heber C Kimball company which they led to the
valley of the Salt Lake consisted of 623 waggons, 1891 souls
131 horses, 44 Mules, 2012 oxens, 983 cows 334 Loose cattle, 654 sheep
237 Pigs, 904 chickens, 54 cats, 134 Dogs, 3 goats, 10 geese, 5 Bee Hives
11 Doves, 1 Sqwrrilll 1 squirrel, 5 Ducks


It is An Exceding cold day. while at Bradford I exhamined
Smiths Illustrated Asstronomy I like it for schools. Burnetts Beautiful
Original Model of Ancient Jerrusalem as it stood in the days of our
Redeemer all carved out of wood is now being exhibited through
America And Attracting the Attention of many as the greatest work
of Art Exhibited in the Last days I wrote A letter to Brother
[FIGURE] Thomas Cartwright And made extracts from Letters


~ Friday


12th I recieved the NY weekly Herald containing the doings
of congress on Calafornia & Mexico but nothing of importance to record


~ Saturday


13th [FIGURE] I done up A Bundle of papers of 100 or more &
[FIGURE] sent to President Brigham Young put into A Box
of Br A. P. Rockwood which he will take charge of I sent
in the same bundle several papers to W. Richards Aphek
Woodruff
John Benbow A. O. Smoot Z Pulsipher & others
I also wrote a letter to President B. Young concerning
the papers.


~ Sunday


14th Sunday I was quite unwell through the day kept
my house the Saints had no meeting in Boston


~ Monday


15 I went to Boston to Reading & back again 25 m

Page 186

~ Tuesday


16th Elder A. P. Rockwood read a Letter to me directed
to Br Joseph Young containing a list of charges
against Br Allexander Badlam, which I considerd
and Believed them to be fals in both spirit & letter in to to
got up through Private Peak a Prejudice against
Br Badlam. I told Br Rockwood in substance the same
and Pointed out to Br Rockwood whare I believed
it was false. He said he would read it to Br Badlam
before he sent it


~ Wednesday


^[FIGURE]^ 17th [FIGURE] I recieved two letters from Br Thomas Cartwright
of New York and wrote two letters one to W. I. Appleby
& one to Joseph Henderson, Massachusetts of Salem. Elders Rockwood and
Badlam were at my house this day and Br Rockwood read
to me and Br Badlam the letter which he read to me yester-
day, containing charges against Br Badlam He denyed the
charges in toto said they were fals & not true and pointed
out wharein. Br Rockwood herd the explaination and was
convinced he was wrong that it was not wisdom to send
such a document and he said he would leave out those
item out of the letter


~ Thursday


18th Was quite unwell with the teeth Ake


~ Friday


19th Was also unwell to day. Brs A. P. Rockwood & A Badlam
called at my house this day and settelled their affairs in
a friendly manner, Brother Rockwood appeared satisfyed
that the accusations which he brought against Br Badlam
were from a fals representation and not in truth and they
parted in friendship


~ Saturday


20th Brother A. P. Rockwood left for the west to day I
was quite unwell yet in company with Br Badlam I rode
to Salem & spent the night with Br Joseph Henderson, Massachusetts 29
Union Street. I was vary sick at night with teeth ake cold
and ague in the face did not sleep at all, during the night
so I had a plenty of time for meditation and among the
subjects before me I reflected upon a Mission that one of the
Presidents of the Seventies presented to the Eastern Branches while
on his mission East to collect funds for building a Seventies
Hall in the valley, why was the mission not signed by Pres-
ident Brigham Young if it was right for such a mission
to be taken, or was it got up to assist the individual in
person more than to build the Seventies Hall, I think it
right and safe to present all missions and business of import
ance before the President of the Church, when they can
be got at 20 miles


~ Sunday


21st Sunday I was still sick through the day my face dbadly
swollen yet I spoke 1 1/2 hours to a small company of the Saints
and spent the night with some English Brethren, but it
was another severe night of paine and affliction I did not
sleep at all. I arose early my face so swollen that I could
scarcely see out of my eyes I had not eaten but little since
I left home, I took the first train of cars with Br Badlam

Page 187

~ Monday


22 [FIGURE] And rode to Boston And Arived home sick And weary
Mrs Woodruff commenced doctering me I took an Emetic
of strong thoroughwert or Boneset tea. I found myself very
Bilious And the tea done me much good Sister Sarah B Foss &
Br Ilus F Carter called upon me to day Br Ilus went on to
New Yourk. Sister Foss stayed with us I recieved one letter
[FIGURE] from Br Henderson. Almon W. Babbit called upon me And
spent the evening And conversed upon A variety of subjects
He had been to Washington And spent A length of time And
Had called to see me And wished me to go to Washington with
him to get An introduction to the members of Congress
in case the Church would wish me to do any business
there another year. He said He had been labouring while
there to so Arange the Territorial Bills As to have A Territo-
rial Government Esstablished in the Great Salt Lake Country
Great Bason North America embracing about 300 miles of
Territory in length called the Utah Territory. He thought
it would ^be^ necessary in order to get it Accomplished for the
inhabitants of the Salt Lake Valley to organize A state Govern-
ment with A Govonor And All repuisite officers And then
let them be Presented to the general government for reception
He said He thought it better for the saints to Have A State
Government of their own than to be connected with New
Mexico
or that Portion of Calafornia lying west of the Mountains
& then have to be Governed by some Petty officers sent from
those parts He said He had got A Post Office Esstablished at the
Salt Lake Valley And Elder Haywood Appointed Post Master
He had Also got A Post Office Esstablished At Garden Grove &
Mount Pisgah. He said He was vary familiar with the members
from Ioway & Illinois And that Thomas Benton of Mo came
to him just before he left & shook hands with him in A vary
familiar manner. He Also read me the printed correspondance
between him And Elder O Hyde comprising their difficulties
And After Hearing all of his subjects through Embracing
his whole course Expectation of office in the general surveyor-
ship of that country, & in the Territorial & State Government
&c &c I come to the following conclusion in my meditations
that He was at work upon his own hook that he was not
counciled by the Presidency of the Church to Engage in this
Government matter, And considering the course the Govern-
ment had taken towards us As A People I felt no disposition
as An individual to Petition them for Any thing, But let them
take whatever course they felt disposed And trust ourselves
And Affairs in the Hands of the God of Israel. yet whatever
course the combined council & wisdom of the Church thought proper
to persue in that channel I would throw my labour And influence
But As their is danger of mens trying to perform more then
they are sendt to do, And whareas I was sent to Preside over the
Eastern churches Preach the gospel to them & gather out as many
of them As I could to Zion, Therefore Resolved that my Present
state of Health, Duty, calling, inclination And the spirit within me
will not permit me to leave the business I was sent to do And go to
Washington to form An acpuaintance & gain influence with wicked
& corrupt men to lay A plan to assist in governing the Saints in the
Valley for with the grace of God I believe they are Able to govern themselves
Yet when called upon to go to Washington By the Presidency Im on hand

Page 188

~ Tuesday


223rd I was sick through the day Br Cory & Another Brother
called to see me He had made Arangements to on board of a
ship & start in few days for the gold diggins He goes He says to
get gold as He is A poor man to move his family to zion He
has Asked no council from me upon the subject but goes
upon his own hook


~ Wednesday


24th [FIGURES] I recieved three letters from G. A. Smith &
E. T. Benson, Dominicas Carter, from the Bluffs
And two from the valley. One from A. O. Smoot Br Smoot
Gives me an account of the Affairs in the valley since his Arival
there He sayes the organization of the Presidency was recieved
at the valley And All business attended to that was necessary
He spoke of Father Woodruff situation since He had been
there, his poor health &c. He said James Bevin had acted the
part of any thing but that of A Gentleman towards my Father
had treated him ill would not give up my house to Br John
Benbow
According to my desire And done wrong in many things
He says the crickets eat up most of my Fathers grain that He put
in &c &c.


G A Smith & E T Benson writes they had organized 50
Branches of the church at council Bluffs, & all doing well most
of the soldiers that went into the Army had arived home to their
families And A feast was made for those who were at the Bluffs
They had built A New Tabernacle on Pigeon in Potta-watamie Co
Br Egan And 12 others arived at the Bluffs on the 27th Dec left the
valley on the 13th October President Young Arived in the valley on the 20th
September And H. C. Kimball on the 24th sept the following is the organ-
ization of the Church at the valley. Brigham Young President over
the whole Church Heber C. Kimball And Willard Richards his councellors
John Smith is Patriarch over the whole church. Charles C Rich
is President in the valley John Young And Erastus Snow are his cou-
ncellors.


Arangments were making for inclosing An Additional
field of 1100 Acres, 860 men had taken shares in it varieing from
5 to 10 Acres the smallest lots being near the city to accomodate
mechanicks. All the buildings composing the fort were to be moved
onto city lots Except the square inclosed by the Pioneers. The Indians
Are friendly, And it is considerd safe to settle on farms. A new
city has been laid out 10 miles north of the Temple Block Another
About 10 miles South. All the lots surveyed had been taken up &
An Addition had been made running to the mountains on the East
sitde. The Pioneer claims Are respected so we shall find A Place
when we go there. Elder Addison Pratt had Arived safe to the valley
in good health And spirits. A company of saints that went on the Broo-
klin were in route for the valley. Willard Richards & Amasa Lyman were
within 3 days drive of the valley when the Express left. Dr Richards
was driving his own team. Elder Kimball writes that they raised spqua
shes in the valley from 63 to 84 lbs & turnips 8 1/2 lbs. P P Pratt made
A vegitable dinner for the Presidency when they arived Among the
Bill of fare were the following Bill of items. Green Corn, Green Peas, green
Beans, Cucumbers, beets, parsnips, carrots, onions, potatoes, turnips squashes
Pumpkins pies, Cabbage, Mush mellons, water mellons, cantelopes, corn
Bread wheat Bread, corn stalk Molasses And Rost Beef &c &c.


G A Smith says that it is vary hard winter so far at the Bluffs He
further Adds that Walker the Famous Utah Chif visited the saints
in the valley with his band of Riflemen. He said Always wished to live
in peace with our people. He wanted his children to grow up with

Page 189

Ours As Brothers that his People should not steal from our
People if any of them did let him know it And He would
Punish them And stop it. the Brethren told him they did
not want his men to steal from the calafornians for we were
at peace with them. Walker replyed my men {Spaniards} [FIGURE] hate the
spanyards And will steal from them And I cannot help it
Brothers Daniel Browett, Allen And Cox were all killed by
A Band of Diggers in the Calafornia Mountains As they were
exploring A new Pass through the mountains, they were surro-
unded whene Asleep And killed with stones. $100 worth of gold
dust was found on the ground which belonged to Brother Allen
theyir bodies were striped of their clothing And then buried by
the Indians. this occurd 40 miles from the settlements on
the Sacramento their bodies were found by A company who followed
them. The Above named Brethren I Baptized in Herefordshire soon
After I commenced Preacheding at Br John Benbows. Br Browett
Esspecially has been A valiant true harted Latter Day Saint And I
know nothing to the contrary of the other, they went into the
Army As soldiers And have died As marters


Br D Carter writes that During the conference at the valley that
the ordeal was Passed upon Lyman Wight to retain his standing
but they had not recieved his Pamphlet nor did not know that
the church had withdrawn fellowship from him at the Bluffs
He also says that fellowship is withdrawn from Almond W. Babbit
for stating or sonfirming the statement to the world that Orson
Hyde
had sold the mormon votes for A Printing Press. President
Young has Advised the Twelve At the Bluffs to come on without
bringing Any Provisions with them ownly to last them there
but Bring groceries Iron, steel, glass seeds of all kinds, Apples
Peaches Pares, chesnuts & Locas &c I recieved A small letter
[FIGURE] Also from the valley speaking of some papers I sent Br Br
Bullock President Young thought had better remain as they were
for the present. I wrote one letter to day to James Burgess
[FIGURE]


~ Thursday


25th [FIGURES] I Recieved 1 letter from Josiah G Hardy & wrote
two to I F Carter And A. W. Babbit Esqr. I dug & pulled out two
of my worst teeth I had with twine And A Jack knife


~ Friday


26th I recieved A letter from Dwight Eveleth of Taunton
my health is some better than it has been Br Bird And wife
spent the evening with us


~ Saturday


27th I recieved the New York Herald weekly of 27th it is full
of the Calafornia gold fever, it seems as though All the world
was running stark mad to go to the gold mines of calafornia
on the sacramento. Hundreds of ships And tens of thousands
of men are preparing to go there. Elder Allexander Badlam
has purchased goods & necessaries And is now Preparing to go
there also on Board of the Corsiar
via Panama As his brother in Law Samuel Brannan is out
there He thinks He will do well


~ Sunday


28th Sunday I preached to the Saints And the world at Br Birds
on [blank]


~ Monday


29th [FIGURES] I wrote 3 letters to Dominicas Carter James Burgess
And Tittle & Hardy. I recieved three Letters from Capt
Joseph Russell & Charles Russell And James Burgess I sent $2
Br Carters Letter for O Hyde to send the Paper to Job Parkhurst

Page 190

~ Tuesday


30th I went to Boston And bought A coking stove paid $12.


~ Wednesday


31st [FIGURE] I wrote two letters one to Samuel Brannan &
[FIGURE] one to James Fergeson to send by the hand of A.
Badlam
who is About to start for the bay of San
Francisco
I Also wrot Elder Allexander ^B.^ two
recommends one to Samuel Brannan And one to B.
Young
And council in Zion I Also wrote Br Badlam
A letter of Memorandom making knows my wishes of
him while He is gone. I Also sent S Brannan 5 Papers
by Br Badlam


~ Thursday


Feb 1st I arose early in the morning Accompanied Elder
Badlam to the ship Corsiar whare He takes passage to
Panama And goes on ofto the Bay of San Francisco to visit his
Brother in Law Samuel Brannan to try to get some gold
to meet his Liabiliaties & to remove his family to the gathering
place of the Saints. He has Acted in concert with the
Presidency of the Church for years past And has stret-
ched out his hand so liberally to try to Assist in rolling
on the general cause of Zion Untill He became involved
several Hundred dollars in dept, And men of the world
now stept fourth And offered to Advance money to pay
his depts And support his family if he would accompa-
ny some of their sons young who were going to the
Bay of San Francisco to try to get gold at the mines
this being the ownly opening which He could see to
pay his depts He considerd it an omin that the hand
of the Lord was in therefore he Accpepted it this is the
cause of his going It snowed hard to day And the
ship did not go out there were 104 passengers on
board they sent most of their provisions around
cape Horn on board of the Pharsailia. Br Badlam came
home And sepnt the night He And Br